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y separately published work icon No Fat Chicks single work   novel   humour   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 No Fat Chicks
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

No fat chicks? When Mandy Miratoosi sees that bumper sticker on her brother Mark's car, she's ready to pluck his cocksure tail feathers once and for all. Mandy is a big girl and Mark's mates need to know that lean is not always dream material. Mandy is out to prove that big chicks can be winners!

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Milsons Point, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Random House , 1998 .
      Extent: 199p.
      ISBN: 0091837405 (pbk.)

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon Voracious Children : Who Eats Whom in Children's Literature Carolyn Daniel , London New York (City) : Routledge , 2006 16055228 2006 multi chapter work criticism

'Voracious Children explores food and the way it is used to seduce, to pleasure, and coerce not only the characters within children's literature but also its readers. There are a number of gripping questions concerning the quantity and quality of the food featured in children's fiction that immediately arise: why are feasting fantasies so prevalent, especially in the British classics? What exactly is their appeal to historical and contemporary readers? What do literary food events do to readers? Is food the sex of children's literature? The subject of children eating is compelling but, why is it that stories about children being eaten are not only horrifying but also so incredibly alluring? This book reveals that food in fiction does far, far more that just create verisimilitude or merely address greedy readers' desires. The author argues that the food trope in children's literature actually teaches children how to be human through the imperative to eat "good" food in a "proper" controlled manner. Examining timely topics such as childhood obesity and anorexia, the author demonstrates how children's literature routinely attempts to regulate childhood eating practices and only award subjectivity and agency to those characters who demonstrate "normal" appetites.

'Examining a wide range of children's literature classics from Little Red Riding Hood to The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, this book is an outstanding and unique enquiry into the function of food in children's literature, and it will make a significant contribution to the fields of both children's literature and the growing interdisciplinary domain of food, culture and society.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Untitled Sue Clancy , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 42 no. 3 1998; (p. 38)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel
Untitled William Norris , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Spring vol. 6 no. 3 1998; (p. 42-43)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel
Untitled Lorien Kaye , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Children's Bookseller & Publisher , April vol. 77 no. 9 1998; (p. 16)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel
Heroines in Good Shape Barry Carozzi , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 203 1998; (p. 44-45)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel ; Ascent into Asgard Geoffrey McSkimming , 1998 single work children's fiction
Untitled Sue Clancy , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 42 no. 3 1998; (p. 38)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel
Heroines in Good Shape Barry Carozzi , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 203 1998; (p. 44-45)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel ; Ascent into Asgard Geoffrey McSkimming , 1998 single work children's fiction
Untitled Lorien Kaye , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Children's Bookseller & Publisher , April vol. 77 no. 9 1998; (p. 16)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel
Untitled William Norris , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Spring vol. 6 no. 3 1998; (p. 42-43)

— Review of No Fat Chicks Margaret Clark , 1998 single work novel
y separately published work icon Voracious Children : Who Eats Whom in Children's Literature Carolyn Daniel , London New York (City) : Routledge , 2006 16055228 2006 multi chapter work criticism

'Voracious Children explores food and the way it is used to seduce, to pleasure, and coerce not only the characters within children's literature but also its readers. There are a number of gripping questions concerning the quantity and quality of the food featured in children's fiction that immediately arise: why are feasting fantasies so prevalent, especially in the British classics? What exactly is their appeal to historical and contemporary readers? What do literary food events do to readers? Is food the sex of children's literature? The subject of children eating is compelling but, why is it that stories about children being eaten are not only horrifying but also so incredibly alluring? This book reveals that food in fiction does far, far more that just create verisimilitude or merely address greedy readers' desires. The author argues that the food trope in children's literature actually teaches children how to be human through the imperative to eat "good" food in a "proper" controlled manner. Examining timely topics such as childhood obesity and anorexia, the author demonstrates how children's literature routinely attempts to regulate childhood eating practices and only award subjectivity and agency to those characters who demonstrate "normal" appetites.

'Examining a wide range of children's literature classics from Little Red Riding Hood to The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, this book is an outstanding and unique enquiry into the function of food in children's literature, and it will make a significant contribution to the fields of both children's literature and the growing interdisciplinary domain of food, culture and society.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Last amended 6 Nov 2006 10:42:56
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