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y separately published work icon Flesh in Armour : A Novel single work   novel   war literature  
First known date: 1932 Issue Details: First known date: 1932... 1932 Flesh in Armour : A Novel
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Leonard Mann privately published his first novel, Flesh in Armour, in Melbourne in 1932, after he was unable to place it with a publisher in Australia or England. The novel was an immediate success, and Mann was subsequently awarded the Australian Literature Society's gold medal for outstanding book of the year. The book's merits then established, it was republished in England and Australia in 1944.

Drawn in part from the author's combat experience in France during World War I, Flesh in Armour is an exploration of the lives of soldiers in the Australian Imperial Force from the Ypres campaign in 1917 until just before the Armistice. The novel follows the actions and evolving attitudes of three soldiers in the same battalion—a naive and handsome raw recruit eager for combat, a schoolteacher whose intellect and anxiety have led to disillusionment, and a courageous warrior-hero who remains undaunted by battle despite being wounded.The novel bears an unmistakable Australian point of view, particularly in its wry sense of humor in spite of the dark subject matter and in its vehement disdain for British commanders.

Nearly 420,000 Australians enlisted during World War I, and more than half were killed, wounded, or captured. The conflict was the most costly in Australia's history. In the fates of his protagonists—one dies valiantly, one dies in an abject and mentally unhinged state, one survives—Mann pays tribute to the sacrifices of his countrymen and reminds readers of the unforgiving test of character found in war then and now. ' (University of South Carolina Press website sighted July 2010)

Contents

* Contents derived from the Columbia, South Carolina,
c
United States of America (USA),
c
Americas,
:
University of South Carolina Press , 2008 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Flesh in Armour : Introduction, Janette Turner Hospital , 2008 single work criticism (p. ix-xviii)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1973 .
      Alternative title: Flesh in Armour
      Extent: 254p.
      Note/s:
      • Verso, title page: First printed and published privately, 1932.
      • Introduced by Marjorie Barnard, 1972.
      ISBN: 0207126453
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 1985 .
      Extent: ix, 254 pp.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Manning Clark.
      ISBN: 086861758X
    • Columbia, South Carolina,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      University of South Carolina Press ,
      2008 .
      Extent: xviii, 349 p.p.
      Note/s:
      • New introduction by Janette Turner Hospital
      • Reproduces the foreword to the first edition and is based on that 1932 edition.
      • Editor's note: The name Bill Potter in chapter 42 ad been carefully hand corrected to read Bill Batten in the 1932 edition of Flesh in Armour used to produce this volume. Batten is the name that appears in the 1944 edition.
      ISBN: 9781570037702 (pbk : alk. paper)
      Series: y separately published work icon The Joseph M. Bruccoli Great War series Z1707595 series - publisher novel poetry prose war literature
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2014 .
      image of person or book cover 7387759001304532296.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 247p.p.
      ISBN: 9780143571742
      Series: y separately published work icon War Popular Penguins Melbourne : Penguin , 2014- 7552598 2014 series - publisher war literature

      'A collection of the best and bravest books about the Anzacs and the First World War.'

      Source: Publisher's description.

Works about this Work

Flesh in Armour and Abjection of War Richard Nile , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Narratives of Estrangement and Belonging : Indo-Australian Perspectives 2016; (p. 21-45)

In this paper, Richard Nile attempts to 'locate Flesh in Armour within the context of a different taboo subject - the treatment of the dead in war.'

Lovely Boys, Good Blokes, and Bonzer Bints : Love and Eroticism in British and Australian Great War Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 28 no. 1 2014; (p. 155-165, 257)
'Rhoden examines love and eroticisam in British and Australian Great War narratives. Interestingly, Australian narratives, with their protagonists even more separated from their women, are also likely to eschew homosexual themes. Although male tenderness exists, it is represented as being of a much lesser degree, at least in its physical manifestation. Male-male friendship–mateships–represented by Australian authors may carry undertones of emotional and physical intensity, but this is usually expressed in curt, economical gestures. The "lovely boys" of British works give way to a bunch of good blokes. Readers need to look more closely for evidence of romance and special individual bonds.' (Publication abstract)
Ruins or Foundations : Great War Literature in the Australian Curriculum Clare Rhoden , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'The Great War has been represented in Australian curricula since 1914, in texts with tones ranging from bellicose patriotism to idealistic pacifism. Australian curricula have included war literature as one way of transmitting cultural values, values that continue to evolve as successive generations relate differently to war and peace. Changes in ethical perspectives and popular feeling have guided text selection and pedagogy, so that texts which were once accepted as foundational to Australian society seem, at later times, to document civilisation's ruin.

In recent years, overseas texts have been preferred above Australian examples as mediators of the Great War, an event still held by many to be of essential importance to Australia. This paper first considers arguments for including Great War texts on the national curriculum, exploring what war literature can, and cannot, be expected to bring to the program. Interrogating the purpose/s of war literature in the curriculum and the ways in which the texts may be used to meet such expectations, the paper then discusses styles of war texts and investigates whether there is a case for including more texts by Australian authors.' (Author's abstract)
What’s Missing in This Picture? : The ‘Middle Parts of Fortune’ in Australian Great War Literature Clare Rhoden , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Philament : Borders, Regions, Worlds , August no. 16 2010; (p. 21-33)
'Disillusionment as a style of war fiction, with its characteristic debunking of old- fashioned glorious-war notions, owes its prominence more to the post-war, depression-oppressed mood of the 1930s than to the war's factual history. Soldier authors such as Sassoon, Graves and Aldington followed Remarque's popular All Quiet on the Western Front (1929) with their own reminiscences, part auto-biography, part imagination, and wholly literary. With an emphasis on the terrible conditions and the devastating experiences of sensitive individual protagonists, the disenchanted novels of the Great War canon expose war's futility and horror. The disenchantment perspective is generally summarised as the culpable sacrifice of idealistic young men by war-mongering politicians and profiteers. Its tropes are the Western Front trench, mud, shellshock, summary executions and the ruin of a generation. Although recent historical and literary analyses have demonstrated errors, exaggerations and misunderstandings in these clichés, popular memory still prefers disillusion. So indeed does current literary fiction set in the period.' (p. 2)
Flesh in Armour : Introduction Janette Turner Hospital , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Flesh in Armour : A Novel 2008; (p. ix-xviii)
A Reader's Notebook Nettie Palmer , 1933 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 15 March vol. 5 no. 3 1933; (p. 38-39)

— Review of Flesh in Armour : A Novel Leonard Mann , 1932 single work novel ; Saturdee Norman Lindsay , 1933 single work novel ; Art in Australia no. 48 (3rd Series) February 1933 periodical issue ; Australia: Human & Economic A. W. Jose , 1932 single work criticism
Is 'Flesh in Armour' Unpleasant Reading? Furnley Maurice , 1933 single work review correspondence
— Appears in: All About Books , 13 April vol. 5 no. 4 1933; (p. 50-51)

— Review of Flesh in Armour : A Novel Leonard Mann , 1932 single work novel
A reader responds negatively to Palmer's review of Flesh in Armour. All About Books solicits a soldier's response and that of Maurice.
A Reader's Notebook Nettie Palmer , 1933 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 October vol. 5 no. 10 1933; (p. 158-159)

— Review of Flesh in Armour : A Novel Leonard Mann , 1932 single work novel ; The Brooks of Morning : Nature and Reflective Essays Donald MacDonald , 1933 selected work prose ; Where the Plain Begins John William Truran , 1933 single work novel ; The Long Beaches and Other South Sea Stories Beatrice Grimshaw , 1933 selected work short story ; Here Comes the King Philip Lindsay , 1933 single work novel
Untitled 1932 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 November vol. 53 no. 2751 1932; (p. 2,5)

— Review of Flesh in Armour : A Novel Leonard Mann , 1932 single work novel
Untitled O. N. Burgess , 1945 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 6 no. 2 1945; (p. 10-11)

— Review of Flesh in Armour : A Novel Leonard Mann , 1932 single work novel
Best Sellers and A.B.A Recommendations 1933 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 16 January vol. 5 no. 1 1933; (p. 10)
Australian Literature Society [Meeting Report] Money Street; The Essay in Australia Doris Hayball , 1933 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 October vol. 5 no. 10 1933; (p. 171)
Report of the September meeting where Macartney, Serle and Lavater spoke on essays and Cottman reviewed Money Street.
England and Australian Literature Leslie Rees , 1934 single work criticism
— Appears in: All About Books , 14 August vol. 6 no. 8 1934; (p. 167)
Centenary Exhibition of Australian Books Nettie Palmer , 1935 single work prose
— Appears in: All About Books , 15 January vol. 7 no. 1 1935; (p. 8)
Palmer praises Marion Agnew's selection of works for the exhibition.
The Novel : Novels of Purpose H. M. Green , 1961 single work criticism
— Appears in: A History of Australian Literature, Pure and Applied : A Critical Review of All Forms of Literature Produced in Australia from the First Books Published After the Arrival of the First Fleet Until 1950, with Short Accounts of Later Publications Up to 1960 1961; (p. 1122-1152)
Last amended 4 Jul 2014 13:00:42
Subjects:
  • c
    France,
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
Settings:
  • 1910s
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