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Issue Details: First known date: 1989... 1989 Fear and Temptation : The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Fanciful Indigeneity Terry Goldie , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 119-128)
'Some time ago, I wrote an article entitled 'On Not Being Australian.' In it I explored the problem of Helen Demidenko and Mudrooroo. These two very well-known and award-winning Australian authors had been revealed as other than they claimed to be. Demidenko, not a Ukranian but, rather, just another Anglo-Australian, seemed simply deceitful, but Mudrooroo was a black street kid who had been treated as Aboriginal and was later proven to be, most likely, of African-American ancestry. I asserted in the article that the uproar over the false identities was wrapped up in the Australian need for those identities, Demidenko as the quintessential immigrant and Mudrooroo as the voice of Aboriginal Australia.' (Author's introduction 119)
Sea-change or Atrophy? The Australian Convict Inheritance Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 5 2011;
This paper is an offshoot of a larger project which explored the possibility for the erstwhile settler-colonizer undergoing the sea-change into settler-indigene emergent through a study of selected novels of Patrick White. It became apparent to me that the convict figure, who played an ancillary role in these works, could lay claim to the status of white indigene well ahead of the main protagonist. Robert Hughes (in The Fatal Shore) discredits the idea of any bonding between the convict and the Aborigine but acknowledges examples of "white blackfellas"—white men who had successfully been adopted into Aboriginal societies. Martin Tucker's nineteenth century work, Ralph Rashleigh, offers surprising testimony of a creative work which bears this out in a context where Australian literature generally reflected the national amnesia with regard to the Aborigine and barely accorded them human status. Grenville's The Secret River (2005), based broadly on the history of her own ancestor, appears to support Hughes' original contention but is also replete with ambivalences that work against a simple resolution. This paper will explore some of the ambivalences, the 'food for thought' on aspects of the Australian experience highlighted by these literary texts, and glances briefly also at variations on the theme in Carey's Jack Maggs and the The True Story of the Kelly Gang. (Author's abstract)
First Nations Phantoms and Aboriginal Spectres : The Function of Ghosts in Settler-Invader Cultures Gerry Turcotte , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 87-111)
'In Specters of Marx Derrida urges us to recognise the phantoms that haunt the literary, the political, the social, the corporate, insisting that '[h]aunting belongs to the structure of every hegemony'. Faced with the recognition of the heavily haunted landscape that we invariably inhabit, we have been compelled to seek out appropriate metaphors to represent such phenomena. Captured through the figure of the ghost, the vampire, the monstrous and the uncanny, the spectral is the new black - we all see dead people! The problem is, of course, that they are not necessarily the same people - or if they are, they mean different things to different folk. Where once these phantoms might have been seen to exist at the limit of the imaginary, they are now recognised as imbuing and infiltrating the very marrow of our being, both troubling and constituting the stories that we tell, the films that we make, the theses that we write.' (Author's abstract)
The Majority Critic Terry Goldie , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Opposition 1994; (p. 83-96)
Stock Commodities in a White Stock Exchange Patrick Holland , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Australian & New Zealand Studies in Canada , December no. 8 1992; (p. 187-189)

— Review of Fear and Temptation : The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures Terry Goldie , 1989 single work criticism
Dark Commodities in White Literatures Roberta Sykes , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 August 1989; (p. 80)

— Review of Fear and Temptation : The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures Terry Goldie , 1989 single work criticism
Untitled Helen Hoy , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Ariel , April vol. 21 no. 2 1990; (p. 98-100)

— Review of Fear and Temptation : The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures Terry Goldie , 1989 single work criticism
Sucking Kumaras Gary Boire , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Canadian Literature , vol. 124-125 no. 1990; (p. 301-306)

— Review of Fear and Temptation : The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures Terry Goldie , 1989 single work criticism
Untitled Robert L. Ross , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: World Literature Today , Spring vol. 64 no. 2 1990; (p. 369-370)

— Review of Fear and Temptation : The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures Terry Goldie , 1989 single work criticism
Race, Racism and Representation Joseph Pugliese , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Span , February no. 31 1991; (p. 111-115)

— Review of Fear and Temptation : The Image of the Indigene in Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Literatures Terry Goldie , 1989 single work criticism
The Majority Critic Terry Goldie , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Opposition 1994; (p. 83-96)
First Nations Phantoms and Aboriginal Spectres : The Function of Ghosts in Settler-Invader Cultures Gerry Turcotte , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 87-111)
'In Specters of Marx Derrida urges us to recognise the phantoms that haunt the literary, the political, the social, the corporate, insisting that '[h]aunting belongs to the structure of every hegemony'. Faced with the recognition of the heavily haunted landscape that we invariably inhabit, we have been compelled to seek out appropriate metaphors to represent such phenomena. Captured through the figure of the ghost, the vampire, the monstrous and the uncanny, the spectral is the new black - we all see dead people! The problem is, of course, that they are not necessarily the same people - or if they are, they mean different things to different folk. Where once these phantoms might have been seen to exist at the limit of the imaginary, they are now recognised as imbuing and infiltrating the very marrow of our being, both troubling and constituting the stories that we tell, the films that we make, the theses that we write.' (Author's abstract)
Sea-change or Atrophy? The Australian Convict Inheritance Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 5 2011;
This paper is an offshoot of a larger project which explored the possibility for the erstwhile settler-colonizer undergoing the sea-change into settler-indigene emergent through a study of selected novels of Patrick White. It became apparent to me that the convict figure, who played an ancillary role in these works, could lay claim to the status of white indigene well ahead of the main protagonist. Robert Hughes (in The Fatal Shore) discredits the idea of any bonding between the convict and the Aborigine but acknowledges examples of "white blackfellas"—white men who had successfully been adopted into Aboriginal societies. Martin Tucker's nineteenth century work, Ralph Rashleigh, offers surprising testimony of a creative work which bears this out in a context where Australian literature generally reflected the national amnesia with regard to the Aborigine and barely accorded them human status. Grenville's The Secret River (2005), based broadly on the history of her own ancestor, appears to support Hughes' original contention but is also replete with ambivalences that work against a simple resolution. This paper will explore some of the ambivalences, the 'food for thought' on aspects of the Australian experience highlighted by these literary texts, and glances briefly also at variations on the theme in Carey's Jack Maggs and the The True Story of the Kelly Gang. (Author's abstract)
Fanciful Indigeneity Terry Goldie , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 119-128)
'Some time ago, I wrote an article entitled 'On Not Being Australian.' In it I explored the problem of Helen Demidenko and Mudrooroo. These two very well-known and award-winning Australian authors had been revealed as other than they claimed to be. Demidenko, not a Ukranian but, rather, just another Anglo-Australian, seemed simply deceitful, but Mudrooroo was a black street kid who had been treated as Aboriginal and was later proven to be, most likely, of African-American ancestry. I asserted in the article that the uproar over the false identities was wrapped up in the Australian need for those identities, Demidenko as the quintessential immigrant and Mudrooroo as the voice of Aboriginal Australia.' (Author's introduction 119)
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