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Issue Details: First known date: 1929... 1929 Ralph Rashleigh, or, The Life of an Exile
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Adaptations

form y separately published work icon Ralph Rashleigh and the Bushrangers Edmund Barclay , Australia : ABC Radio National , 1953 12881679 1953 single work radio play

An adaptation of an episode from Ralph Rashleigh.

Notes

  • The original manuscript (ca.1845) of the novel, Ralph Rashleigh, or, The Life of an Exile, cites the author as Giacomo di Rosenberg. Rosenberg is presumed to be a pseudonym of James Tucker.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1952 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Ralph Rashleigh : Introduction, Colin Roderick , single work criticism biography (p. xi-xlviii)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Jonathan Cape ,
      1929 .
      Alternative title: The Adventures of Ralph Rashleigh : A Penal Exile in Australia, 1825-1844
      Link: 8490183Full text document AustLit Full Text
      Extent: 349; 5 leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus., facsims.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by the Earl of Birkenhead.
      • Publisher's Note regarding the manuscript: '...It was sent to us by Mr Charles H. Bertie, the well-known librarian of Sydney, New South Wales. Mr Bertie explained to us that it had come into his hands from a man who had inherited it from his wife's father, in whose possession it had remained for thirty years. Mr Bertie read the manuscript and was so sure of its importance that he had it typed and sent to us in England. We recognised its value and interest, but the archaic literary style of the writer made us doubt whether the book would be acceptable to modern readers. So the manuscript was rewritten, but with absolute fidelity to the original story...some pages of [the] precious and ragged original are reproduced in this book...'
      • Digitised by AustLit in cooperation with SETIS, 2003.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Jonathan Cape ,
      1931 .
      Alternative title: The Adventures of Ralph Rashleigh : a penal exile in Australia 1825-1844
      Extent: 349, 35, [5] leaves of plates : facsims.p.
      Reprinted: 1939
      Series: The Life and Letters Series Jonathan Cape (publisher), series - publisher Number in series: 20
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Jonathan Cape ,
      1933 .
      Alternative title: The Adventures of Ralph Rashleigh : a penal exile in Australia
      Extent: 256 [12]p.p.
      Series: Florin Books Jonathan Cape (publisher), series - publisher
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      George Newnes ,
      1936 .
      Alternative title: The Adventures of Ralph Rashleigh : a penal exile in Australia, 1825-1844
      Extent: 255p.
Alternative title: Ralph Rashleigh : un forcat en Australie
Language: French

Other Formats

  • Also braille, sound recording.

Works about this Work

Colonial Australian Detectives, Character Type and the Colonial Economy Ken Gelder , Rachael Weaver , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Directions in Popular Fiction : Genre, Distribution, Reproduction 2016; (p. 43-66)

'Crime fiction started early in Australia, emerging out of the experiences of transportation and the convict system at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The first Australian (that is, locally published) novel is generally agreed to be Quintus Servinton (1832), written by Henry Savery, a convicted forger who was transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) in 1825 and—convicted once more of forging financial documents—died as a prisoner in Port Arthur in 1842. Quintus Servinton is a kind of semi-autobiographical fantasy that imagines its entrepreneurial protagonist’s redemption: surviving his conviction and jail sentence in order to return to England with his beloved wife. We can note here that it does four important things in terms of the future of crime narratives in Australia. Firstly, it presents colonial Australia as a place already defined by an apparatus of policing, legal systems and governance, where ‘justice’ can at least potentially work to restore an individual’s status and liberty: for example, through convict emancipation. Secondly, it insists that the experience of incarceration and punishment is crucial to that character’s reintegration into respectable life: ‘the stains that had marked him’, we are told, ‘were removed by the discipline he had been made to endure’ (Savery, vol. 3, ch. XIII, n.p.). Thirdly, the novel ties the colonial economy to financial investment and growth on the one hand, and fraud or forgery on the other. These apparent opposites are folded together at the moment of settlement to the extent that the phrase ‘forging the colonial economy’ is a kind of potent double entendre. Prominent transported forgers included the colonial artists Thomas Whatling (transported 1791), Joseph Lycett (transported 1814), Thomas Wainewright (transported 1837) and of course Henry Savery himself. In Savery’s novel, Quintus Servinton is ‘thunderstruck’ when someone explains the conventional distinction between legitimate financial deals and forgeries: ‘You surely do not mean, Sir, it can be a forgery, to issue paper bearing the names of persons who never existed….If that be the case…many commercial men innocently issue forgeries every day of their lives’ (vol. 1, ch. III, n.p.). This takes us to the fourth point: that crime fiction in Australia is also about imposture, where characters do indeed adopt ‘the names of persons who never existed’. The mutability of colonial characters—the question of how real (authentic) or fictional (fraudulent) they might be, and the impacts this has socially and fiscally on the colonial scene—soon becomes a tremendous problem for emergent systems of policing and governance in Australia. As Janet C. Myers notes, ‘the linkage between emigration and crime forged through convict transportation continued to evoke anxieties….The atmosphere in which such anxieties were nurtured was one of rapid social mobility and shifting identities in the Antipodes’ (2009, p. 83).' (Introduction)

Convict Life Revealed Robert Willson , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 26 January 2014; (p. 26)
The Settler Evolution : Space, Place and Memory in Early Colonial Australia Grace Karskens , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 2 2013;

'Ideas and expectations about colonial space and the making and remaking of real places lie at the heart of the early Australian colonies. Over the past forty years, and especially in the last decade, scholars have recovered much of that lost world, a world of polyglot diversity, constant movement, economic social and cultural expansion, cross-cultural encounters, relationships and appropriations, extraordinary adaptations, myriad connections and overlaid human geographies.

'Yet in the later nineteenth century, the colonies were also profoundly shaped by discontinuities in memory, place and experience, as wave upon wave of new arrivals started new lives literally unaware of what had happened earlier, or how these places had come to be. The success of later settlers was built upon those earlier foundations, and yet false assumptions about ‘gaol colonies’ and ‘savages’, twinned with assertions of legitimate occupancy and entitlement, easily captured the narrative as well as the literal ground, and are still widespread in Australian historiography, popular history and heritage today.' (Author's abstract)

Sea-change or Atrophy? The Australian Convict Inheritance Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 5 2011;
This paper is an offshoot of a larger project which explored the possibility for the erstwhile settler-colonizer undergoing the sea-change into settler-indigene emergent through a study of selected novels of Patrick White. It became apparent to me that the convict figure, who played an ancillary role in these works, could lay claim to the status of white indigene well ahead of the main protagonist. Robert Hughes (in The Fatal Shore) discredits the idea of any bonding between the convict and the Aborigine but acknowledges examples of "white blackfellas"—white men who had successfully been adopted into Aboriginal societies. Martin Tucker's nineteenth century work, Ralph Rashleigh, offers surprising testimony of a creative work which bears this out in a context where Australian literature generally reflected the national amnesia with regard to the Aborigine and barely accorded them human status. Grenville's The Secret River (2005), based broadly on the history of her own ancestor, appears to support Hughes' original contention but is also replete with ambivalences that work against a simple resolution. This paper will explore some of the ambivalences, the 'food for thought' on aspects of the Australian experience highlighted by these literary texts, and glances briefly also at variations on the theme in Carey's Jack Maggs and the The True Story of the Kelly Gang. (Author's abstract)
Out of England : Literary Subjectivity in the Australian Colonies, 1788-1867 Simon During , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imagining Australia : Literature and Culture in the New New World 2004; (p. 3-21) Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 61-72)
'...During traces the formation and transformation of 'modern literary subjectivity' in the distinctive conditions of nineteenth century Australia.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Untitled Freda Barrymore , 1929 single work review
— Appears in: The North Queensland Register , 26 October 1929; (p. 39)

— Review of Ralph Rashleigh, or, The Life of an Exile James Tucker , 1929 single work novel
Untitled 1952 single work review
— Appears in: The Cairns Post , 6 December 1952; (p. 6)

— Review of Ralph Rashleigh, or, The Life of an Exile James Tucker , 1929 single work novel
Untitled Franziska , 1929 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 24 September vol. 5 no. 44 1929; (p. 24)

— Review of Ralph Rashleigh, or, The Life of an Exile James Tucker , 1929 single work novel
Franziska concludes that, although the book is 'very rawly told in places', it is important because it is told from the convict's point of view.
Convict Author Ronald Campbell , 1953 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Journal , 2 February 1953; (p. 80)

— Review of Ralph Rashleigh, or, The Life of an Exile James Tucker , 1929 single work novel
Untitled Frederick T. Macartney , 1953 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 12 no. 1 1953; (p. 121-125)

— Review of Old Books, Old Friends, Old Sydney James R. Tyrrell , 1952 single work autobiography ; Ralph Rashleigh, or, The Life of an Exile James Tucker , 1929 single work novel ; Pressmen and Governors : Australian Editors and Writers in Early Tasmania : A Contribution to the History of the Australian Press and Literature with Notes Biographical and Bibliographical E. Morris Miller , 1952 single work criticism ; True Patriots All : Or, News from Early Australia as Told in a Collection of Broadsides 1952 anthology poetry prose correspondence
Imitation, Abrogation and Appropriation: The Production of the Post-Colonial Text Gareth Griffiths , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 9 no. 1 1987; (p. 13-20)
Some Further Aspects of Ralph Rashleigh Barbara Douglas , 1978 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 6 no. 1 1978; (p. 16-23)
Convict's Telling Tale Luke Slattery , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 28-29 August 2004; (p. 40)
Out of England : Literary Subjectivity in the Australian Colonies, 1788-1867 Simon During , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imagining Australia : Literature and Culture in the New New World 2004; (p. 3-21) Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 61-72)
'...During traces the formation and transformation of 'modern literary subjectivity' in the distinctive conditions of nineteenth century Australia.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Convict Who Wrote a Classic Colin Roderick , 1953 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian Journal , 1 August 1953; (p. 21-23)
Last amended 2 Sep 2016 10:56:21
Settings:
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • Sydney, New South Wales,
  • Newcastle, Newcastle - Hunter Valley area, New South Wales,
  • Queensland,
  • Bush,
  • Coast,
  • 1820-1849
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