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Lawson's Joe Wilson : A Skeleton Novel single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1964... 1964 Lawson's Joe Wilson : A Skeleton Novel
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Wallace-Crabbe discusses the ways in which the stories of Joe Wilson and His Mates connect to produce a larger unified work. Lawson's self-analysis in this work provides many of the intertextual connections based primarily on biographical knowledge. The common element in these stories is Joe Wilson's attempts to "pull the threads of his past life into some shape".

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Australian Literary Studies ALS vol. 1 no. 3 June 1964 Z595581 1964 periodical issue 1964 pg. 147-154
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Australian Nationalists : Modern Critical Essays Chris Wallace-Crabbe (editor), Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1971 Z65882 1971 anthology criticism Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1971 pg. 100-107
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Melbourne or the Bush : essays on Australian literature and society Chris Wallace-Crabbe , Cremorne : Angus and Robertson , 1974 Z65348 1974 selected work criticism Cremorne : Angus and Robertson , 1974 pg. 24-32
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The AustLit Anthology of Criticism Leigh Dale , Linda Hale , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2010 Z1679436 2010 anthology criticism The articles collected here have been selected with non-specialist readers in mind and aim to provide insights and valuable understandings into the works of important Australian writers. Upper secondary and lower tertiary students and general readers will find these articles useful for the study of leading Australian writers whether that is happening in years 11 and 12; first, second and third year university courses; or reading groups. St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2010 pg. 29

Works about this Work

Time in Some Aussie and Kiwi Short Stories : Lawson, Baynton, Palmer, and Sargeson Angelo Righetti , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Time and the Short Story 2012; (p. 105-118)
'The short story in Australia and New Zealand has flourished from the last decade of the nineteenth century onwards, and has been strictly bound to orality - yarns, yarn-spinning (Bennet 5) - from its early days, as the speech cadence of a usually sympathetic storyteller, either involved in the narrative, or simply an eye-witness or a bystander, interacting with listeners / readers, influences its time-scale, rhythm, tempo and structure.

A few significant stories by representative short-fiction writers from the late nineteenty century well into the mid-twentieth century - Australian Henry Lawson, Barbara Baynton, Vance Palmer, and New Zealand Frank Sargeson - though reflecting specific colonial realities and issues in a period of nation building, will be discussed here for their contribution to a relatively new genre, with specific regard to their treatment of time, changing from a traditional to a gradually experimental mode where they are sometimes forerunners or aware of modernist techniques.' (105)
Time in Some Aussie and Kiwi Short Stories : Lawson, Baynton, Palmer, and Sargeson Angelo Righetti , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Time and the Short Story 2012; (p. 105-118)
'The short story in Australia and New Zealand has flourished from the last decade of the nineteenth century onwards, and has been strictly bound to orality - yarns, yarn-spinning (Bennet 5) - from its early days, as the speech cadence of a usually sympathetic storyteller, either involved in the narrative, or simply an eye-witness or a bystander, interacting with listeners / readers, influences its time-scale, rhythm, tempo and structure.

A few significant stories by representative short-fiction writers from the late nineteenty century well into the mid-twentieth century - Australian Henry Lawson, Barbara Baynton, Vance Palmer, and New Zealand Frank Sargeson - though reflecting specific colonial realities and issues in a period of nation building, will be discussed here for their contribution to a relatively new genre, with specific regard to their treatment of time, changing from a traditional to a gradually experimental mode where they are sometimes forerunners or aware of modernist techniques.' (105)
Last amended 27 May 2015 09:17:42
100-107 Lawson's Joe Wilson : A Skeleton Novelsmall AustLit logo
147-154 Lawson's Joe Wilson : A Skeleton Novelsmall AustLit logo Australian Literary Studies
24-32 Lawson's Joe Wilson : A Skeleton Novelsmall AustLit logo
29 /austlit/page/0?nodeType=fullText&ftdir=5435874847985120145-brn21736&ftaid=C186356 Lawson's Joe Wilson : A Skeleton Novelsmall AustLit logo
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