AustLit logo
y separately published work icon Voyager Poems anthology   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 1960... 1960 Voyager Poems
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Brisbane, Queensland,:Jacaranda Press , 1960 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Voyager Poems : Introduction, Douglas Stewart , single work (p. 7-16)
Voyager Poems : Author's Notes, Francis Webb , single work (p. 122-123)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Brisbane, Queensland,: Jacaranda Press , 1960 .
      Extent: 123p.
      Note/s:
      • Editor's note: ... I do think that the poems in this book are the most substantial, the most impressive, yet written in Australia. In total colour of scene and action and in largeness of theme and concept there has been nothing to equal them. ... Douglas Stewart. (7-16).
      • Author's Notes (115-123).
      • Partial contents indexed. Remainder pending.

Works about this Work

Voyaging through Depth and Shallows Michael Sharkey , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Poetic Eye : Occasional Writings 1982-2012 2016; (p. 330-339)

— Review of Voyager Poems 1960 anthology poetry
'The book isn't much to look at.  It's a small-format paperback from Jacaranda Press in Brisbane, who used to produce educational texts that had an appeal beyond the classroom. The has a small drawing of seventeenth-century caravel, with a bowsprit sail, two mainsails on the foremast, and a lateen sail on the aft mast. The picture sits below the title and the name of the editor Douglas Stewart. The top left-hand corner bears the legend Australian University Paperbacks. (Was this an early advertising ploy, suggesting at once that the book was 'set' by universities and, more cunningly, reminding anyone who saw the thing that there were in fact such things as Australian universities? Nowadays, any sort of poetry book is 'set' for university study.) The poems are listed at the bottom left-hand corner of the page: "Five Visions of Captain Cook" by Kenneth Slessor, "Heemskerck Shoals" by Robert D. FitzGerald, "Worsley Enchanted" by Douglas Stewart, "The Wind at Your Door" by FitzGerald, "Christopher Columbus" by William Hart—Smith, and "Leichhardt in Theatre" by Francis Webb. Stewart didn't jib at including a work of his own in the anthology: an interesting matter to me, since Peter Porter told me years ago that it wasn't done to include one's own work in a book one was editing. Not that I've seen much evidence of lack of hubris in anthologies printed since that time (1977) — or before: including one's own work in an anthology of acclaimed writers can be taken merely as suggesting one wants to be regarded as 'seriously good'. But neither Stewart nor his publishers needed to convince anyone by the end of the 1950s that he was full bottle.' (Introduction)
 
Douglas Stewart and `Voyager Poems' Michael Sharkey , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Salt , vol. 9 no. 1996; (p. 71-80)
Mapping the Unknown: Australian Mythical Landscape in Douglas Stewart's Voyager Poems Igor Maver , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia's Changing Landscapes : Proceedings of the Second EASA Conference : Sitges, Barcelona, October 1993 1995; (p. 139-144) Readings in Contemporary Australian Poetry 1997; (p. [57]-65)
The "Vossification" of Ludwig Leichhardt Horst Priessnitz , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: From Berlin to the Burdekin : the German contribution to the development of Australian science, exploration and the arts 1991; (p. 196-217)
Narrative Poetry Robert D. FitzGerald , 1966 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 26 no. 1 1966; (p. 11-24) Of Places and Poetry 1976; (p. 154-173) Robert D. FitzGerald 1987; (p. 159-172)
Six Voyagers E. Jones , 1960 single work review
— Appears in: The Observer , 12 November vol. 3 no. 23 1960; (p. 33)

— Review of Voyager Poems 1960 anthology poetry
Exploring the Explorers T. Inglis Moore , 1960 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 23 November vol. 81 no. 4215 1960; (p. 58-59)

— Review of Voyager Poems 1960 anthology poetry
Voyaging through Depth and Shallows Michael Sharkey , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Poetic Eye : Occasional Writings 1982-2012 2016; (p. 330-339)

— Review of Voyager Poems 1960 anthology poetry
'The book isn't much to look at.  It's a small-format paperback from Jacaranda Press in Brisbane, who used to produce educational texts that had an appeal beyond the classroom. The has a small drawing of seventeenth-century caravel, with a bowsprit sail, two mainsails on the foremast, and a lateen sail on the aft mast. The picture sits below the title and the name of the editor Douglas Stewart. The top left-hand corner bears the legend Australian University Paperbacks. (Was this an early advertising ploy, suggesting at once that the book was 'set' by universities and, more cunningly, reminding anyone who saw the thing that there were in fact such things as Australian universities? Nowadays, any sort of poetry book is 'set' for university study.) The poems are listed at the bottom left-hand corner of the page: "Five Visions of Captain Cook" by Kenneth Slessor, "Heemskerck Shoals" by Robert D. FitzGerald, "Worsley Enchanted" by Douglas Stewart, "The Wind at Your Door" by FitzGerald, "Christopher Columbus" by William Hart—Smith, and "Leichhardt in Theatre" by Francis Webb. Stewart didn't jib at including a work of his own in the anthology: an interesting matter to me, since Peter Porter told me years ago that it wasn't done to include one's own work in a book one was editing. Not that I've seen much evidence of lack of hubris in anthologies printed since that time (1977) — or before: including one's own work in an anthology of acclaimed writers can be taken merely as suggesting one wants to be regarded as 'seriously good'. But neither Stewart nor his publishers needed to convince anyone by the end of the 1950s that he was full bottle.' (Introduction)
 
The "Vossification" of Ludwig Leichhardt Horst Priessnitz , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: From Berlin to the Burdekin : the German contribution to the development of Australian science, exploration and the arts 1991; (p. 196-217)
Mapping the Unknown: Australian Mythical Landscape in Douglas Stewart's Voyager Poems Igor Maver , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia's Changing Landscapes : Proceedings of the Second EASA Conference : Sitges, Barcelona, October 1993 1995; (p. 139-144) Readings in Contemporary Australian Poetry 1997; (p. [57]-65)
Narrative Poetry Robert D. FitzGerald , 1966 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 26 no. 1 1966; (p. 11-24) Of Places and Poetry 1976; (p. 154-173) Robert D. FitzGerald 1987; (p. 159-172)
Douglas Stewart and `Voyager Poems' Michael Sharkey , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Salt , vol. 9 no. 1996; (p. 71-80)
Voyager Poems Douglas Stewart , 1960 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 30 November vol. 81 no. 4216 1960; (p. 59)
Last amended 14 Nov 2007 16:11:56
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X