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Issue Details: First known date: 1989... 1989 The New Diversity : Australian Fiction : 1970-88
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Ken Gelder and Paul Salzman position Aboriginal writings as emerging alongside the growing body of multicultural writers in Australia through the seventies and eighties. Their work pre-empts Marian Boreland's discussion of the competing voices and the relegation of Aboriginal and multicultural writers to victim spaces, essentially the confinement of Aboriginal writing to the 'other'. Their analysis brings to the forefront the continuing debate over traditionalism/pluralism versus 'mixed heritage urban Aboriginal people' who appear to do nothing different, or nothing that non-Aboriginal readers relate to as repressing Aboriginal culture.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,:McPhee Gribble , 1989 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Production, Ken Gelder , Paul Salzman , 1989 single work criticism (p. 1-10)
Representing Short Stories, Ken Gelder , 1989 single work criticism (p. 11-25)
Connections North, Paul Salzman , 1989 single work criticism (p. 26-53)
The Women's Story, Paul Salzman , 1989 single work criticism (p. 54-81)
Regions and Regionalism, Paul Salzman , 1989 single work criticism (p. 82-112)
Other Alternatives : Speculative Fiction, Ken Gelder , 1989 single work criticism (p. 113-139)
Dialogues with History, Ken Gelder , 1989 single work criticism (p. 140-165)
Sex, Ken Gelder , 1989 single work criticism (p. 166-186)
Voices of the Migrant Experience, Paul Salzman , 1989 single work criticism (p. 187-204)
Aboriginality, Ken Gelder , 1989 single work criticism (p. 205-242)
The Personal and the Political, Paul Salzman , 1989 single work criticism (p. 243-262)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Metapolitics vs. Identity Politics : (Re-)Radicalising the Postcolonial Penelope Pitt-Alizadeh , Ali Alizadeh , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 73 no. 1 2013; (p. 57-74)

'Postcolonialism may be defined as a theoretical framework for reading and appreciating cultural production between normative Western "forms of social explanation" and "more complex cultural and political boundaries" that demarcate responses to this normativity (Bhabha 248) As such, this framework has been extremely beneficial for, among other things, introducing and highlighting the work of writers from non-Western cultural backgrounds, particularly Indigenous and multicultural or diasporic writers whose works convey conceptual and aesthetic themes and values at once foreign and responsive to Western European literary modalities. Thanks to postcolonial theory and associated methodologies, a very diverse range of writers from a host of cultural origins and locations has been accepted by and incorporated into most, if not all, Western academic and literary milieus.' (Authors' introduction.)

‘Women’s Writing’ and ‘Feminism’ : A History of Intimacy and Estrangement Zora Simic , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms Along the Edge , May no. 28 2013;
'Women’s Liberation in Australia and elsewhere created feminist readers and writers. Consciousness-raising and reading and writing were intimately linked. Within the women’s movement, journals, magazines and newspapers were launched, small presses inaugurated and writing and reading groups formed. Subscription lists charted the explosion in new titles by, for and about women, and feminist bookshops stocked them. Women’s writers’ festivals, poetry readings and book launches were opportunities to find and promote new work, and to meet other feminists. Some women writers from the past were rediscovered and many contemporary female writers were championed. One of the most successful writers to emerge on the Australian literary scene in the 1970s – Helen Garner, whose debut novel Monkey Grip (1977) won the National Book Council’s Book of the Year award in 1978 – directly linked her ascendency to feminism. A specifically feminist literary criticism began to develop. More generally, feminism also helped to expand the market for women’s writing, so much so that by the 1980s major publishers were developing lists of women’s fiction and/ or subsuming feminist presses into their operations.' (Author's introduction)
Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
The Postcolonial Perspective on an Regional Literature in Australia Per Henningsgaard , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 57-74)
Liars vs the New Diversity: Is There an Alternative to 'Postmodernist' Literary Studies? Cameron Richards , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Current Tensions : Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference : 6 - 11 July 1996 1996; (p. 30-38)
Plotting 5, a Quarterly Account of Recent Fiction Helen Daniel , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , February no. 117 1990; (p. 52-57)

— Review of Oceana Fine Tom Flood , 1989 single work novel ; The New Diversity : Australian Fiction : 1970-88 Ken Gelder , Paul Salzman , 1989 selected work criticism ; A Man of Marbles Rod Usher , 1989 single work novel ; The Mountain Graham Henderson , 1989 single work novel
Diverse Voices Reba Gostand , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , April vol. 9 no. 1 1990; (p. 58-60)

— Review of My Father's Moon Elizabeth Jolley , 1989 single work novel ; The Fortunes of Mary Fortune Mary Fortune , 1989 selected work autobiography prose ; The New Diversity : Australian Fiction : 1970-88 Ken Gelder , Paul Salzman , 1989 selected work criticism ; In the Winter Dark Tim Winton , 1988 single work novel ; City to City Laurie Clancy , 1989 selected work short story ; Flawless Jade Barbara Hanrahan , 1989 single work novel ; Eight Voices of the Eighties : Stories, Journalism and Criticism by Australian Women Writers 1989 anthology criticism extract short story autobiography correspondence prose review interview
Committed and Engaging Works Jeff Doyle , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 24 March 1990; (p. B4)

— Review of The Good Reading Guide 1989 anthology review ; First Rights : A Decade of Island Magazine 1989 anthology poetry short story criticism autobiography ; The New Diversity : Australian Fiction : 1970-88 Ken Gelder , Paul Salzman , 1989 selected work criticism ; Patrick White Speaks Patrick White , 1989 selected work autobiography correspondence prose
For Intrepid Voyagers, a Literary Lighthouse by Which to Navigate Ivor Indyk , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 30 September - 1 October 1989; (p. 10)

— Review of The New Diversity : Australian Fiction : 1970-88 Ken Gelder , Paul Salzman , 1989 selected work criticism
Our Exiles and Fiction Writers Peter Pierce , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 26 August 1989; (p. 12)

— Review of The New Diversity : Australian Fiction : 1970-88 Ken Gelder , Paul Salzman , 1989 selected work criticism ; A Sense of Exile : Essays in the Literature of the Asia-Pacific Region 1988 anthology biography prose criticism
The Postcolonial Perspective on an Regional Literature in Australia Per Henningsgaard , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 57-74)
Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
Liars vs the New Diversity: Is There an Alternative to 'Postmodernist' Literary Studies? Cameron Richards , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Current Tensions : Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference : 6 - 11 July 1996 1996; (p. 30-38)
‘Women’s Writing’ and ‘Feminism’ : A History of Intimacy and Estrangement Zora Simic , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms Along the Edge , May no. 28 2013;
'Women’s Liberation in Australia and elsewhere created feminist readers and writers. Consciousness-raising and reading and writing were intimately linked. Within the women’s movement, journals, magazines and newspapers were launched, small presses inaugurated and writing and reading groups formed. Subscription lists charted the explosion in new titles by, for and about women, and feminist bookshops stocked them. Women’s writers’ festivals, poetry readings and book launches were opportunities to find and promote new work, and to meet other feminists. Some women writers from the past were rediscovered and many contemporary female writers were championed. One of the most successful writers to emerge on the Australian literary scene in the 1970s – Helen Garner, whose debut novel Monkey Grip (1977) won the National Book Council’s Book of the Year award in 1978 – directly linked her ascendency to feminism. A specifically feminist literary criticism began to develop. More generally, feminism also helped to expand the market for women’s writing, so much so that by the 1980s major publishers were developing lists of women’s fiction and/ or subsuming feminist presses into their operations.' (Author's introduction)
Metapolitics vs. Identity Politics : (Re-)Radicalising the Postcolonial Penelope Pitt-Alizadeh , Ali Alizadeh , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 73 no. 1 2013; (p. 57-74)

'Postcolonialism may be defined as a theoretical framework for reading and appreciating cultural production between normative Western "forms of social explanation" and "more complex cultural and political boundaries" that demarcate responses to this normativity (Bhabha 248) As such, this framework has been extremely beneficial for, among other things, introducing and highlighting the work of writers from non-Western cultural backgrounds, particularly Indigenous and multicultural or diasporic writers whose works convey conceptual and aesthetic themes and values at once foreign and responsive to Western European literary modalities. Thanks to postcolonial theory and associated methodologies, a very diverse range of writers from a host of cultural origins and locations has been accepted by and incorporated into most, if not all, Western academic and literary milieus.' (Authors' introduction.)

Last amended 10 Jan 2013 15:22:44
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