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Beautiful Yuroke Red River Gum single work   poetry   "Sometimes the red river gums rustled"
Issue Details: First known date: 1996... 1996 Beautiful Yuroke Red River Gum
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Notes

  • Dedication: (for the Northlands Secondary College Mobile Rebel School)
  • Listed date of composition: September 1994

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Dreaming in Urban Areas Lisa Bellear , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1996 Z174905 1996 selected work poetry

    'These poems are anything but motionless. Their emotions cut, determined to map out another possibility, a place of personal and social reconciliation.' (Source: Back cover)

    St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1996
    pg. 28-29
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Landbridge : Contemporary Australian Poetry John Kinsella (editor), North Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1999 Z310159 1999 anthology poetry North Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 1999 pg. 41
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Fire Front : First Nations Poetry and Power Today Alison Whittaker (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2020 18673559 2020 anthology poetry essay

    'This important anthology, curated by Gomeroi poet and academic Alison Whittaker, showcases Australia’s most-respected First Nations poets alongside some of the rising stars. Featured poets include Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Ruby Langford Ginibi, Ellen van Neerven, Tony Birch, Claire G. Coleman, Evelyn Araluen, Jack Davis, Kevin Gilbert, Lionel Fogarty, Sam Wagan Watson, Ali Cobby Eckermann, Archie Roach and Alexis Wright.

    'Divided into five thematic sections, each one is introduced by an essay from a leading Aboriginal writer and thinker — Bruce Pascoe, Ali Cobby Eckermann, Chelsea Bond, Evelyn Araluen and Steven Oliver — who reflects on the power of First Nations poetry with their own original contribution. This incredible book is a testament to the renaissance of First Nations poetry happening in Australia right now.'

    Source: Publisher's blurb.

    St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 2020
    pg. 15-16

Works about this Work

Whose Land Is It? : Recentring Aboriginal Voices in Our Search for a Home Timmah Ball , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 77 no. 2 2018; (p. 54-61)

'Through the thin plaster wall I can hear her breathing in the adjacent bedroom. Most nights it’s a faint hum but occasionally her breath morphs into a gravelly snore that is slightly alleviated by earplugs. Living with my mother triggers intimacies I wasn’t expecting, but also deepens our relationship. Coffees before work and conversations in the courtyard pull us even closer. But there is a small feeling that I am doing something unacceptable. Returning home at 33 is often considered strange, like something went wrong. When the writer Maggie Nelson contemplated living with her mother she wrote, ‘I flashed momentarily upon the ghastly scene in the French film The Piano Teacher in which Isabelle Huppert sleeps nightly with her mother in the same bed’. ' (Introduction)

Whose Land Is It? : Recentring Aboriginal Voices in Our Search for a Home Timmah Ball , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 77 no. 2 2018; (p. 54-61)

'Through the thin plaster wall I can hear her breathing in the adjacent bedroom. Most nights it’s a faint hum but occasionally her breath morphs into a gravelly snore that is slightly alleviated by earplugs. Living with my mother triggers intimacies I wasn’t expecting, but also deepens our relationship. Coffees before work and conversations in the courtyard pull us even closer. But there is a small feeling that I am doing something unacceptable. Returning home at 33 is often considered strange, like something went wrong. When the writer Maggie Nelson contemplated living with her mother she wrote, ‘I flashed momentarily upon the ghastly scene in the French film The Piano Teacher in which Isabelle Huppert sleeps nightly with her mother in the same bed’. ' (Introduction)

Last amended 17 Aug 2020 12:25:46
Subjects:
  • Kulin, Dumbleyung - Kulin - Pingrup - Newdegate area, Far Southwest Western Australia, Western Australia,
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • p13632
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