AustLit logo
And Dug My Fingers in the Sand single work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 1999... 1999 And Dug My Fingers in the Sand
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Latest Issues

Notes

  • sequence

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Sequence parts indexed separately
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Scarp no. 35 October 1999 Z594333 1999 periodical issue 1999 pg. 18-20

Works about this Work

Not so Much As a Thought : Poetry and Philosophy Brook Emery , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , July vol. 4 no. 1 2014;
'‘Not So Much a Thought’ explores the real or professed dichotomies between thought and feeling, mind and body, the personal and the universal to consider the general relationship between philosophy and poetry. Beginning with Brook Emery’s own poetry and broadening to consider the views of Romantic and modern poets (Wordsworth, Coleridge, Wallace Stevens, Robert Gray), literary critics (Samuel Johnson, Marjorie Perloff, Hank Lazer) and philosophers (Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty) it argues that philosophy and poetry are not antagonistic, as has often been assumed, but that they are different ways of thinking and saying. It concludes that a poem is inevitably a form of reasoning even if it does not employ, in Heidegger’s phrase, ‘the logic of calculating reason’. ' (Publication abstract)
Not so Much As a Thought : Poetry and Philosophy Brook Emery , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , July vol. 4 no. 1 2014;
'‘Not So Much a Thought’ explores the real or professed dichotomies between thought and feeling, mind and body, the personal and the universal to consider the general relationship between philosophy and poetry. Beginning with Brook Emery’s own poetry and broadening to consider the views of Romantic and modern poets (Wordsworth, Coleridge, Wallace Stevens, Robert Gray), literary critics (Samuel Johnson, Marjorie Perloff, Hank Lazer) and philosophers (Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty) it argues that philosophy and poetry are not antagonistic, as has often been assumed, but that they are different ways of thinking and saying. It concludes that a poem is inevitably a form of reasoning even if it does not employ, in Heidegger’s phrase, ‘the logic of calculating reason’. ' (Publication abstract)
Subjects:
  • Coast,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X