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Wine-buying : Pokolbin single work   poetry   "A strand of sun"
  • Author:agent Geoff Page http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/page-geoff
Issue Details: First known date: 1971... 1971 Wine-buying : Pokolbin
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Two Poets Geoff Page , Philip Roberts , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1971 Z427635 1971 selected work poetry St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1971 pg. 14

Works about this Work

“Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?” I Do : Postwar Australian Wine, Gendered Culture and Class Julie McIntyre , John Germov , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 65-84)

'During an era of expanding social inclusion in the 1960s and 1970s, Australians increasingly drank more wine than at any previous time in colonial or national history. These wines were made in new styles and consumed in accordance with new habits across gender and class. The morphology of one of Australia’s most popular “introduction wines” of this period, Lindeman’s Ben Ean Moselle, reveals the emergence of new elements of national character. From being advertised to women in the late 1960s as “just right”, Ben Ean’s cultural messaging in the 1970s flirted with general appeal to men and women of the new middle class: “anywhere, anytime”. Then, by the mid-1980s, the ascendancy of this light, semi-sweet table wine was halted by the emergence of an elitism in which new professionals favoured consumer products of provenanced distinction. The arc of Ben Ean’s rise and fall symbolises an informalisation and subsequent reformalisation of values, conventions and identities during a time of social and cultural flux.'  (Publication abstract)

“Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?” I Do : Postwar Australian Wine, Gendered Culture and Class Julie McIntyre , John Germov , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 65-84)

'During an era of expanding social inclusion in the 1960s and 1970s, Australians increasingly drank more wine than at any previous time in colonial or national history. These wines were made in new styles and consumed in accordance with new habits across gender and class. The morphology of one of Australia’s most popular “introduction wines” of this period, Lindeman’s Ben Ean Moselle, reveals the emergence of new elements of national character. From being advertised to women in the late 1960s as “just right”, Ben Ean’s cultural messaging in the 1970s flirted with general appeal to men and women of the new middle class: “anywhere, anytime”. Then, by the mid-1980s, the ascendancy of this light, semi-sweet table wine was halted by the emergence of an elitism in which new professionals favoured consumer products of provenanced distinction. The arc of Ben Ean’s rise and fall symbolises an informalisation and subsequent reformalisation of values, conventions and identities during a time of social and cultural flux.'  (Publication abstract)

Subjects:
  • Country towns,
  • Pokolbin, Cessnock area, Hunter Valley, Newcastle - Hunter Valley area, New South Wales,
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