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Issue Details: First known date: 1941... 1941 I'd Live the Same Life Over : Being the Progress, or Rather the Circumgyration of Philip Lindsay
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Hutchinson ,
      1941 .
      Extent: 285p.

Works about this Work

Drawing off the Rich Cream : The Struggle in London Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 91-110)
'The rich cream of Miles Franklin's simile on some cases maintained its sweetly luscious quality in England, but in others it turned out to be just skim milk after all, or else the vinegary life of the metropolis soon curdled it. Franklin herself knew this very well. She found no real literary success herself in London, and permits the authorial voice in Cockatoos (speaking from her own experience) to strike a conspiratorial note, with a warning of a deliberate censoring of bad news from the capital. "The facts about those who starved in the Big Smoke until the hat went round to generous compatriots to send them home," says the narrator darkly, " were not in the Sydney newspapers and did not weigh against successes." Perhaps so, but there was always room in the newspapers for yet another report on that most acceptable and uplifting trajectory of the expatriate: the longing to leave, the confused arrival, the temporary disillusionment, the struggle, the slowly rising fortunes, the moderate or great success: in short, the good news that the game plan had worked. The fewer the initial prospects, the more unlikely the ascent, the more the stay-at-homes were eager for details.' (Authors introduction 91-92)
Will Dyson and Philip Lindsay Jack Lindsay , 1982 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Overland , May no. 87 1982; (p. 46-47)
Sydney Bohemians 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 September vol. 62 no. 3215 1941; (p. 2)

— Review of I'd Live the Same Life Over : Being the Progress, or Rather the Circumgyration of Philip Lindsay Philip Lindsay , 1941 single work autobiography
Untitled 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 26 April 1941; (p. 206)

— Review of I'd Live the Same Life Over : Being the Progress, or Rather the Circumgyration of Philip Lindsay Philip Lindsay , 1941 single work autobiography
Untitled 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 26 April 1941; (p. 206)

— Review of I'd Live the Same Life Over : Being the Progress, or Rather the Circumgyration of Philip Lindsay Philip Lindsay , 1941 single work autobiography
Sydney Bohemians 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 September vol. 62 no. 3215 1941; (p. 2)

— Review of I'd Live the Same Life Over : Being the Progress, or Rather the Circumgyration of Philip Lindsay Philip Lindsay , 1941 single work autobiography
Drawing off the Rich Cream : The Struggle in London Peter Morton , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lusting for London : Australian Expatriate Writers at the Hub of Empire, 1870-1950 2011; (p. 91-110)
'The rich cream of Miles Franklin's simile on some cases maintained its sweetly luscious quality in England, but in others it turned out to be just skim milk after all, or else the vinegary life of the metropolis soon curdled it. Franklin herself knew this very well. She found no real literary success herself in London, and permits the authorial voice in Cockatoos (speaking from her own experience) to strike a conspiratorial note, with a warning of a deliberate censoring of bad news from the capital. "The facts about those who starved in the Big Smoke until the hat went round to generous compatriots to send them home," says the narrator darkly, " were not in the Sydney newspapers and did not weigh against successes." Perhaps so, but there was always room in the newspapers for yet another report on that most acceptable and uplifting trajectory of the expatriate: the longing to leave, the confused arrival, the temporary disillusionment, the struggle, the slowly rising fortunes, the moderate or great success: in short, the good news that the game plan had worked. The fewer the initial prospects, the more unlikely the ascent, the more the stay-at-homes were eager for details.' (Authors introduction 91-92)
Will Dyson and Philip Lindsay Jack Lindsay , 1982 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Overland , May no. 87 1982; (p. 46-47)
Last amended 19 Jan 2006 11:17:36
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