Panther and Peacock single work   poetry   "Professor Eisenbart, with grim distaste,"
Issue Details: First known date: 1957... 1957 Panther and Peacock
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Australian Poetry 1957 Hal Porter (editor), Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1957 Z27989 1957 anthology poetry Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1957 pg. 25-27
  • Appears in:
    y Poems [Volume 1] Gwen Harwood , Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1963 Z421270 1963 selected work poetry Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1963 pg. 70-72
  • Appears in:
    y Modern Australian Verse Douglas Stewart (editor), Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1964 Z390812 1964 anthology poetry Editor's Introduction: The anthology covers 'from 1930 onwards'... And, lastly, of course, an anthology of this kind should attempt to give as wide a picture as possible, consistent with quality, of Australian poetry in the period. That I have certainly tried to do; but without losing sight of the principle that it should be enjoyable. ... Douglas Stewart (q.v.) (xxi-xxxv). Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1964 pg. 147-149
  • Appears in:
    y New Impulses in Australian Poetry Rodney Hall (editor), Thomas Shapcott (editor), St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1968 Z548090 1968 anthology poetry

    This 'anthology of Australian poetry of the 1960s, was edited, with an introduction, by Rodney Hall and Thomas W. Shapcott. The keynote of these ‘new impulses’ was ‘a suspicion of idealism, and an inbred awareness of the consequences of totalitarian beliefs’. Authoritarianism in religion and politics was eschewed, as was the concept of national and international aggression. Major established poets such as Kenneth Slessor, Judith Wright and A. D. Hope are not represented because the editors felt that their poetry of the decade added little to their already defined stances. Their contemporaries, however, Gwen Harwood and Francis Webb, are given considerable space because they are important influences on younger poets.' (Source : The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, online edition)

    St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1968
    pg. 61-63
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Literary Studies ALS vol. 5 no. 3 May 1972 Z647576 1972 periodical issue 1972 pg. 229-230
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems [1975] Gwen Harwood , Sydney London : Angus and Robertson , 1975 Z420751 1975 selected work poetry This collection contains a selection from Poems and Poems : Volume Two as well as 27 new poems. Sydney London : Angus and Robertson , 1975 pg. 33-35
  • Appears in:
    y The Collins Book of Australian Poetry Rodney Hall , Sydney : Collins , 1981 Z542215 1981 anthology poetry Sydney : Collins , 1981 pg. 248-249
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems [1985] Gwen Harwood , North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1985 Z443272 1985 selected work poetry A revision of Selected Poems, first published by Angus and Robertson in 1975. It incorporates poems from The Lion's Bride, 1981. North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1985 pg. 33-35
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems [1990] Gwen Harwood , North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990 Z313285 1990 selected work poetry North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990 pg. 37-38
  • Appears in:
    y Bridgings : Readings in Australian Women's Poetry Rose Lucas (editor), Lyn McCredden (editor), South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 Z219096 1996 anthology poetry criticism extract South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 pg. 32-34
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems : A New Edition Gwen Harwood , Gregory Kratzmann (editor), Victor Harbor : Halcyon Press , 2001 Z824188 2001 selected work poetry Details of the changes made in compiling this selection are outlined in the editor's introduction . Some poems not appearing in previous selections, as well as some unpublished poems, have been added; some poems previously appearing have been omitted. Textual emendations have been made to some works. Victor Harbor : Halcyon Press , 2001 pg. 34-35

Works about this Work

'Having Fun with the Professors' : Gwen Harwood and Doctor Eisenbart Ann-Marie Priest , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 32 no. 1 2017;

'This essay examines the role of Gwen Harwood’s Eisenbart poems in helping to establish her career as a serious poet. It argues that Harwood had more trouble breaking into the male-dominated world of Australian poetry than is generally acknowledged, and that the Eisenbart poems, which centre on a fictional scientist, represent a turning point in her literary fortunes. In the 1950s, Harwood struggled to get the kind of attention she sought from a number of influential poetry editors and reviewers, many of whom were also academics. Chief among them for her were A. D. Hope, Vincent Buckley and James McAuley. Her Eisenbart poems, which both play up to and satirise the cultural icon of the god-professor, were an attempt to subvert expectations of so-called ‘lady poets’ and beat the ‘professors’ at their own game. They also gave literary expression to the debate between positivism and humanism that dominated some aspects of academic life in the 1950s, and to the anger and frustration Harwood experienced at repeated rejections of her work.'

Source: Abstract.

The Poetry of Dobson, Harwood and Wright : 'Within the Bounds of Feminine Sensibility?' Jennifer Strauss , 1979 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 38 no. 3 1979; (p. 334-349) Still the Frame Holds : Essays on Women Poets and Writers 1993; (p. 79-99)
A Prodigious Dilemma: Gwen Harwood's Professor Eisenbart and the Vices of the Intellect Dennis Douglas , 1973 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 6 no. 1 1973; (p. 77-82)
Gwen Harwood and the Professors A. D. Hope , 1972 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 5 no. 3 1972; (p. 227-232) Native Companions : Essays and Comments on Australian Literature, 1936-1966 1974; (p. 197-203)
Gwen Harwood -- The Poet as Doppelganger Dennis Douglas , 1969 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , March-April vol. 13 no. 2 1969; (p. 15-19)
Gwen Harwood and the Professors A. D. Hope , 1972 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 5 no. 3 1972; (p. 227-232) Native Companions : Essays and Comments on Australian Literature, 1936-1966 1974; (p. 197-203)
A Prodigious Dilemma: Gwen Harwood's Professor Eisenbart and the Vices of the Intellect Dennis Douglas , 1973 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 6 no. 1 1973; (p. 77-82)
Gwen Harwood -- The Poet as Doppelganger Dennis Douglas , 1969 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , March-April vol. 13 no. 2 1969; (p. 15-19)
The Poetry of Dobson, Harwood and Wright : 'Within the Bounds of Feminine Sensibility?' Jennifer Strauss , 1979 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 38 no. 3 1979; (p. 334-349) Still the Frame Holds : Essays on Women Poets and Writers 1993; (p. 79-99)
'Having Fun with the Professors' : Gwen Harwood and Doctor Eisenbart Ann-Marie Priest , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 32 no. 1 2017;

'This essay examines the role of Gwen Harwood’s Eisenbart poems in helping to establish her career as a serious poet. It argues that Harwood had more trouble breaking into the male-dominated world of Australian poetry than is generally acknowledged, and that the Eisenbart poems, which centre on a fictional scientist, represent a turning point in her literary fortunes. In the 1950s, Harwood struggled to get the kind of attention she sought from a number of influential poetry editors and reviewers, many of whom were also academics. Chief among them for her were A. D. Hope, Vincent Buckley and James McAuley. Her Eisenbart poems, which both play up to and satirise the cultural icon of the god-professor, were an attempt to subvert expectations of so-called ‘lady poets’ and beat the ‘professors’ at their own game. They also gave literary expression to the debate between positivism and humanism that dominated some aspects of academic life in the 1950s, and to the anger and frustration Harwood experienced at repeated rejections of her work.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 18 Nov 2010 15:36:18
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