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y separately published work icon The Sunny South single work   drama   humour   - Five acts
Issue Details: First known date: 1884... 1884 The Sunny South
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Adaptations

form y separately published work icon The Sunny South; or The Whirlwind of Fate ( dir. Alfred Rolfe ) Australia : Fraser Film Release and Photographic Company , 1915 7702384 1915 single work film/TV

Advertised as a 'sensational drama of Australian life on the goldfields in the early days'.

Source:

'Pictoria', The Maitland Daily Mercury, 3 May 1915, p.7.

Notes

  • Filmed in Australia in 1914.

Production Details

  • First produced at the Prince of Wales Opera House, Melbourne, 31 March 1883. Also at the Grand Theatre, Islington, England, 27 October 1884. The play toured major centres of Australia, New Zealand, America and possibly South Africa with Darrell playing the leading role for up to 1500 times. Also produced at the Surrey Theatre, London, January 1980.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      1884 .
      (Manuscript) assertion
      Note/s:
      • Manuscript dated 1884 is held at the British Library, London, MS ADD 53326.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Eyre Methuen ,
      1975 .
      Extent: xxi, 91pp.
      Note/s:
      • Includes a select bibliography, notes, textual annotations and an historical note by Geoffrey Serle..
      ISBN: 0869370316 (pbk), 0869370316 (hbk)

Works about this Work

The Pioneer Legend and Its Legacy : In Memory of John Hirst Richard Waterhouse , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society , June vol. 103 no. 1 2017; (p. 7-25)

'In a famous study, The Australian Legend, first published in 1958, Russel Ward argued that the bush legend was the central foundation story that explained the evolution of Australian character and nationalism. Ward's version of the legend explained how from convict times onwards itinerant bush workers had created and adhered to an ethos that encompassed mateship, anti-authoritarianism (including hostility to Britain and its empire), egalitarianism, and adaptability. Although the bush legend allegedly originated with and was nurtured by a bush proletariat, Ward proposed that this regional ethos became a national creed at the turn of the 20th century, transmitted from rural to urban Australia through conduits that included the trade union movement, periodicals like The Bulletin, and the work of writers like Lawson and Paterson. (Publication abstract)

The Australian Character on the Nineteenth Century Stage Richard Fotheringham , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Defining Acts : Australia on Stage : A Centenary of Federation Exhibition Celebrating the Australian Character on the Popular Stage over the Past 100 Years 2001; (p. 8-13)
'Pity Eliza and Ann Winstanley. They came to Australia as children in 1833 and a few years later became two of Sydney's star actors, only to be yelled off the Royal Victoria Theatre stage by the cabbage-tree mob because they were 'un-Australian'. The cabbage-tree youths were the first European children born in Australia. They were the sons and daughters of convicts, soldiers and settlers. Fiercely proud of their 'native' status, they wore hats woven from cabbage-tree palm leaves and tied with black ribbon. Already, it was being noticed that they spoke with a different accent and that with sunshine and plenty of fresh meat they were growing taller than their parents: 'cornstalks''. (p. 8)
George Darrell's The Sunny South : Cultural Allegory and Racial Ideology Russell McDougall , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Talent(ed) Digger : Creations, Cameos, and Essays in Honour of Anna Rutherford 1996; (p. 449-459)
Overshadowed by Stilted Narrative Alanna Maclean , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 11 October 1995; (p. 39)

— Review of The Sunny South George Darrell , 1884 single work drama ; The Time is Not Yet Ripe : A Comedy in Four Acts Louis Esson , 1912 single work drama
Theatre Christopher Bedloe , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Muse , October no. 146 1995; (p. 29)

— Review of Here Under Heaven Mona Brand , 1955 single work drama ; The Sunny South George Darrell , 1884 single work drama
Untitled 1896 single work review
— Appears in: The Free-Lance , 18 June vol. 1 no. 9 1896; (p. 4)

— Review of The Sunny South George Darrell , 1884 single work drama
Theatre Christopher Bedloe , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Muse , October no. 146 1995; (p. 29)

— Review of Here Under Heaven Mona Brand , 1955 single work drama ; The Sunny South George Darrell , 1884 single work drama
Forgettable Launch of a New Company Brian Hoad , 1980 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 15 January vol. 100 no. 5194 1980; (p. 50)

— Review of The Sunny South George Darrell , 1884 single work drama
Untitled H. G. Kippax , 1980 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 January 1980; (p. 8)

— Review of The Sunny South George Darrell , 1884 single work drama
Untitled B. O'Connor , 1980 single work review
— Appears in: Theatre Australia , vol. 4 no. 7 1980; (p. 32)

— Review of The Sunny South George Darrell , 1884 single work drama
George Darrell, an Ambitious Dramatist Eric Irvin , 1976 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , May vol. 20 no. 5 1976; (p. 39-45)
The Australian Character on the Nineteenth Century Stage Richard Fotheringham , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Defining Acts : Australia on Stage : A Centenary of Federation Exhibition Celebrating the Australian Character on the Popular Stage over the Past 100 Years 2001; (p. 8-13)
'Pity Eliza and Ann Winstanley. They came to Australia as children in 1833 and a few years later became two of Sydney's star actors, only to be yelled off the Royal Victoria Theatre stage by the cabbage-tree mob because they were 'un-Australian'. The cabbage-tree youths were the first European children born in Australia. They were the sons and daughters of convicts, soldiers and settlers. Fiercely proud of their 'native' status, they wore hats woven from cabbage-tree palm leaves and tied with black ribbon. Already, it was being noticed that they spoke with a different accent and that with sunshine and plenty of fresh meat they were growing taller than their parents: 'cornstalks''. (p. 8)
Australian Drama from 'Sunny South' to 'Fire on the Snow' George Landen Dann , 1954 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Writing : The 1954 Anthology of the Queensland Authors and Artists Association (Fellowship of Australian Writers, Queensland Section) 1954; (p. 22-26)
Drama Terry Sturm , 1981 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford History of Australian Literature 1981; (p. 175-267)
The Need for Research in Theatre History Virginia Kirby-Smith , 1964 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , September vol. 23 no. 3 1964; (p. 315-319)
Last amended 8 May 2006 13:06:17
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