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y separately published work icon The Australian and Other Verses selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 1916... 1916 The Australian and Other Verses
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Notes

  • Dedication: To the Men of Australia, who have proved for all time their unconquerable spirit and unswerving loyalty to the right, I dedicate these songs of the misty land they fought for and the sunny land that bred them.
  • Many of the poems in this volume were published in British journals; the title poem first appeared in London Punch under the title 'The bravest thing God ever made'. Miller's Australian Literature From its Beginnings to 1935 (1940): 65 notes that this volume reprinted many poems from The Overlander and Other Verses (1913). H.M. Green's A History of Australian Literature Pure and Applied (1961): 372-373 considers Ogilvie's best Australian ballads to have appeared in this 1916 work.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1916 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Australiani"The skies that arched his land were blue", Will H. Ogilvie , single work poetry war literature (p. 3-4)
The Outlawi"Our realm was the fenceless ranges. We fed in the blue grass swamps;", Will H. Ogilvie , single work poetry (p. 25-29)
The Bushi"I hear you slighted often and maligned", Will H. Ogilvie , single work poetry (p. 56)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1916 .
      Extent: 158, [2]leaves of platesp.
      Description: col. illus.
      Series: y separately published work icon Pocket Editions for the Trenches Angus and Robertson (publisher), 1916-1918 Z1309361 1916 series - publisher

      Published by Angus and Robertson in during the First World War, these small-format editions (14.5cm X 11.5cm.) were designed to fit the tunic pockets of the Anzacs. Each volume was published with a full colour dustjacket, frontispiece and title page vignette. 'Into their presentation was poured much love and care and, despite the necessary wartime frugality which generally restricted the use of all but monotone printing, the work of three outstanding illustrators was commissioned to be reproduced in full colour. Most of those illustrated editions left the country never to return and so copies are ... rare... It is interesting to speculate the effect these illustrations may have had on the troops - Norman Lindsay's dusty droving and homestead scenes, Lionel Lindsay's magnificent wild brumbies and his grandfatherly Saltbush surrounded by "little rouseabouts", Hal Gye's soldiers from an earlier conflict, ramrod straight on sentry duty or in the saddle' (Publishers note, Collected Verse of A. B. Paterson,1982, p.vii-viii).

      In 2018, HarperCollins republished the series (under the imprint Angus and Robertson) to mark the centenary of the end of the First World War.

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1982 .
      Extent: xviii, 174, [2]leaves of platesp.
      Description: col. illus.
      Note/s:
      • Facsimile of the 1916 ed.
      ISBN: 0207145474
    • Sydney South, South Sydney area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 8797896138879879885.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 180p.p.
      Edition info: Facsimile of 1916 ed.
      ISBN: 9781460756041, 1460756045

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

Desert Worlds Richard Nile , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 79 no. 1 2019; (p. 84-105)
'In late 1914, twenty thousand mostly young Australian men ventured forth from the driest inhabited continent on earth to cross the ocean in a convoy spread over twenty-five kilometres in length and measuring twenty kilometres in width. The greatest mass exodus from the Antipodes which included a further ten thousand New Zealanders, this was the first and largest of many similar voyages over the next four years. The Australians might have considered themselves to be desert people. “The sand has his own / Wave and motion,” wrote S. Musgrove in “Australia Deserta” in the first issue of Southerly in 1939, “Rages the bed / Of the stony ocean” (14). Yet they preferred to identify as colonial sons returning to the motherland of pastoral England before heading to war. Of their own place, “They call her a young country but they lie,” wrote A. D. Hope in his much debated poem “Australia” which he began writing around the time of the publication of the inaugural issue—and to which he contributed an essay—“She is the last of lands, the emptiest, / ... the womb within is dry” (Hope).' 

 (Introduction)

A New Ogilvie Volume 1916 single work review
— Appears in: The Lone Hand , 1 November vol. 6 no. 6 1916; (p. 341)

— Review of The Australian and Other Verses Will H. Ogilvie , 1916 selected work poetry
A New Ogilvie Volume 1916 single work review
— Appears in: The Lone Hand , 1 November vol. 6 no. 6 1916; (p. 341)

— Review of The Australian and Other Verses Will H. Ogilvie , 1916 selected work poetry
Desert Worlds Richard Nile , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 79 no. 1 2019; (p. 84-105)
'In late 1914, twenty thousand mostly young Australian men ventured forth from the driest inhabited continent on earth to cross the ocean in a convoy spread over twenty-five kilometres in length and measuring twenty kilometres in width. The greatest mass exodus from the Antipodes which included a further ten thousand New Zealanders, this was the first and largest of many similar voyages over the next four years. The Australians might have considered themselves to be desert people. “The sand has his own / Wave and motion,” wrote S. Musgrove in “Australia Deserta” in the first issue of Southerly in 1939, “Rages the bed / Of the stony ocean” (14). Yet they preferred to identify as colonial sons returning to the motherland of pastoral England before heading to war. Of their own place, “They call her a young country but they lie,” wrote A. D. Hope in his much debated poem “Australia” which he began writing around the time of the publication of the inaugural issue—and to which he contributed an essay—“She is the last of lands, the emptiest, / ... the womb within is dry” (Hope).' 

 (Introduction)

Last amended 4 Apr 2018 09:08:51
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