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y separately published work icon The Well Dressed Explorer single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1962... 1962 The Well Dressed Explorer
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Also published as a sound recording

Works about this Work

“Yrs Patrick” : Thea Astley’s Brush with Timely Advice on “The Rackety Career of Novel Writing” Karen Lamb , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 53-65)
'Thea Astley had a difficult relationship with critical responses to her work throughout her entire writing life. Success - early or late career (for she had both) - did little to diminish the wounds she felt were inflicted when a reviewer or critic got to work on her "style". By the mid-1980s there were even some Australian literary scholars who were beginning to endorse Astley's own sense of critical foul play. Elizabeth Perkins wrote of Astley's fiction being the kind of writing which not only "disconcerts enthusiastic readers" but seems to render it "beyond the reach of the more usual modes of criticism" (Perkins 11; 17). Yet until now little has been said about how this state of affairs developed or how Astley, over time, came to deal with it - despite the many re - marks she made in interviews which indicate just how strange her relationship with her public persona as a writer actually was. Astley, for her part, became adept at deflection: her teenage poetry was "a form of acne" (Smith 43); she was "incapable of playing the game of the writertaking- himself-seriously seriously" (Astley, Kunapipi 21); she was just a "bit of a misfit" (Astley, Australian Voices 37) and later, more defensively, "I've worked all my life and I haven't had to time to be in the ghetto de Balmain" (Astley, Sunday Herald 3). One person who had an impact on Astley's self-regard at an early stage in her writing life was Patrick White. The record of the friendship has thus far rested on the evidence of its beginning and ending, detailed in David Marr's biography Patrick White: A life (1991) yet a letter White wrote to Astley in 1961, and which Astley kept from view and from publication in Marr's subsequent collection of White's letters, is a critical new source from which we can interpret the influence of White's mentoring of Astley.' (Author's abstract)
Thea Astley : Writing in Overpoweringly a Male Dominated Literary World Megha Trivedi , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Indian Review of World Literature in English , July vol. 6 no. 2 2010;
This paper is an attempt to explore different themes in the novels of Thea Astley.(p. 1)
Thea Astley : Exploring the Centre Paul Genoni , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Subverting the Empire : Explorers and Exploration in Australian Fiction 2004; (p. 97-144)
Thea Astley : A Woman among the Satirists of Post-war Modernity Susan Sheridan , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , November vol. 18 no. 42 2003; (p. 261-271)
The article examines Astley's early satirical novels, asking the question, what do these early satires on gender relations share with those of her male contemporaries, and where do they differ? Are her suburbs and small towns vehicles for satire and ironies that blame women for the excesses and failures of modernity? Arguing that post-war modernism was a strongly masculinist culture which saw art defined by its distance to everyday life, popular values and middle-class consumerism, Sheridan concludes: 'To the extent that she shared this dominant masculinist aesthetic of the 1950s and 1960s, Astley's satirical stance involved her, inevitably, in a modernist rejection of this feminine modernity as innately trivial, distracting and undermining serious aesthetic, intellectual and spiritual values' (270).
The Multiple Effects of Thea Astley's Fiction Jay Verney , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hot Iron Corrugated Sky : 100 Years of Queensland Writing 2002; (p. 100-110)
Miles Franklin Award '63 Ray Williams , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: Realist Writer , November no. 13 1963; (p. 24)

— Review of The Well Dressed Explorer Thea Astley , 1962 single work novel ; The Cupboard Under the Stairs George Turner , 1962 single work novel
One of the Year's Best Sidney J. Baker , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 December 1962; (p. 17)

— Review of The Well Dressed Explorer Thea Astley , 1962 single work novel
Untitled 1962 single work review
— Appears in: The Cairns Post , 22 December 1962; (p. 7)

— Review of The Well Dressed Explorer Thea Astley , 1962 single work novel
Untitled John K. Ewers , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: The Critic , 19 July vol. 4 no. 4 1963; (p. 33-4)

— Review of The Well Dressed Explorer Thea Astley , 1962 single work novel
A Novel Chronicle D. R. Burns , 1964 single work review
— Appears in: Prospect , vol. 7 no. 1 1964; (p. 27-29)

— Review of The Tilted Cross Hal Porter , 1961 single work novel ; The Well Dressed Explorer Thea Astley , 1962 single work novel ; The Cupboard Under the Stairs George Turner , 1962 single work novel ; Tourmaline Randolph Stow , 1963 single work novel ; The Hollow Woodheap David Forrest , 1962 single work novel
Thea Astley : A Woman among the Satirists of Post-war Modernity Susan Sheridan , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Feminist Studies , November vol. 18 no. 42 2003; (p. 261-271)
The article examines Astley's early satirical novels, asking the question, what do these early satires on gender relations share with those of her male contemporaries, and where do they differ? Are her suburbs and small towns vehicles for satire and ironies that blame women for the excesses and failures of modernity? Arguing that post-war modernism was a strongly masculinist culture which saw art defined by its distance to everyday life, popular values and middle-class consumerism, Sheridan concludes: 'To the extent that she shared this dominant masculinist aesthetic of the 1950s and 1960s, Astley's satirical stance involved her, inevitably, in a modernist rejection of this feminine modernity as innately trivial, distracting and undermining serious aesthetic, intellectual and spiritual values' (270).
Thea Astley : Exploring the Centre Paul Genoni , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Subverting the Empire : Explorers and Exploration in Australian Fiction 2004; (p. 97-144)
Thea Astley : Writing in Overpoweringly a Male Dominated Literary World Megha Trivedi , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Indian Review of World Literature in English , July vol. 6 no. 2 2010;
This paper is an attempt to explore different themes in the novels of Thea Astley.(p. 1)
The Multiple Effects of Thea Astley's Fiction Jay Verney , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hot Iron Corrugated Sky : 100 Years of Queensland Writing 2002; (p. 100-110)
“Yrs Patrick” : Thea Astley’s Brush with Timely Advice on “The Rackety Career of Novel Writing” Karen Lamb , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 53-65)
'Thea Astley had a difficult relationship with critical responses to her work throughout her entire writing life. Success - early or late career (for she had both) - did little to diminish the wounds she felt were inflicted when a reviewer or critic got to work on her "style". By the mid-1980s there were even some Australian literary scholars who were beginning to endorse Astley's own sense of critical foul play. Elizabeth Perkins wrote of Astley's fiction being the kind of writing which not only "disconcerts enthusiastic readers" but seems to render it "beyond the reach of the more usual modes of criticism" (Perkins 11; 17). Yet until now little has been said about how this state of affairs developed or how Astley, over time, came to deal with it - despite the many re - marks she made in interviews which indicate just how strange her relationship with her public persona as a writer actually was. Astley, for her part, became adept at deflection: her teenage poetry was "a form of acne" (Smith 43); she was "incapable of playing the game of the writertaking- himself-seriously seriously" (Astley, Kunapipi 21); she was just a "bit of a misfit" (Astley, Australian Voices 37) and later, more defensively, "I've worked all my life and I haven't had to time to be in the ghetto de Balmain" (Astley, Sunday Herald 3). One person who had an impact on Astley's self-regard at an early stage in her writing life was Patrick White. The record of the friendship has thus far rested on the evidence of its beginning and ending, detailed in David Marr's biography Patrick White: A life (1991) yet a letter White wrote to Astley in 1961, and which Astley kept from view and from publication in Marr's subsequent collection of White's letters, is a critical new source from which we can interpret the influence of White's mentoring of Astley.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 27 Jun 2001 14:29:22
Subjects:
  • Urban,
  • Melbourne, Victoria,
  • Sydney, New South Wales,
  • Queensland,
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