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y separately published work icon Shade's Children single work   novel   young adult   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 Shade's Children
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

In a savage postnuclear world, four young fugitives attempt to overthrow the bloodthirsty rule of the Overlords with the help of Shade, their mysterious mentor.

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.
  • Other formats: Also braille.
  • Other formats: Also dyslexic edition
  • Other formats: Also large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • St Leonards, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 1997 .
      Extent: 303p.
      ISBN: 1864483784
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperCollins ,
      1997 .
      Extent: 310p.
      ISBN: 0060273240
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperTrophy ,
      1998 .
      Extent: 345p.
      Reprinted: 2003
      ISBN: 0064471969 (pbk.)
    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2006 .
      Extent: 334p.
      ISBN: 1741148049
    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2012 .
      image of person or book cover 3082820017175594793.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 348 p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 1st June 2012.

      ISBN: 174237977X, 9781742379777

Works about this Work

[Review] Shade's Children Carol Townsing , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 20 no. 1 2006; (p. 56)

— Review of Shade's Children Garth Nix , 1997 single work novel
[Review] Shade's Children Lev Lafayette , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: TiconderogaOnline , Winter no. 8 2006;

— Review of Shade's Children Garth Nix , 1997 single work novel
The Theme of Premature Burial in Garth Nix's Early Novels Alice Mills , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers: Explorations into Children's Literature , May vol. 16 no. 1 2006; (p. 51-57)
This article looks at three early novels by Garth Nix, The Ragwitch (1990), Sabriel (1995), Shade's Children (1997) through the context of Freud's 'uncanny' and Carl Jung's work on rebirth and individuation. Tracing the theme of premature burial through the texts, Mills draws together the pessimistic Freudian view of the 'uncanny' and the more positive and heroic path of individuation which Jung put forward, to demonstrate how Nix incoporates these two different understandings of the human psyche into his narratives and manages to attain a level of balance between them both. In terms of premature burial, both Freud and Jung 'agree that the tomb is symbolically the domain of the monstrous mother' and the site where monstrous rebirths occur as well as a site of repression. Mills argues that Nix's novels succeed in blending together two world views and create a truly successful hero, capable of entering the underworld (tomb) and at the same time escaping the paralysis and distintergation of identity that premature burial engenders. (pp.56-57).
New Social Orders : Reconceptualizing Family and Community in Utopian Fiction Kerry Mallan , Clare Bradford , John Stephens , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 15 no. 2 2005; (p. 6-21)
In this collaborative essay, Mallan, Bradford and Stephens interrogate the links between the family, the social well-being of a nation and its individual citizens in conjunction with representations of 'new social orders'(6). They consider how notions of family are developed in selected texts, including Shades Children (Garth Nix) and Boy Overboard (Morris Gleitzman), pointing out that in all three novels, 'various social imaginaries unfold, each gesturing towards a utopian outcome in which family becomes the unifying point for previously isolated or marginalized individuals' (7). For Mallen et al, the challenge in reading utopian novels that deal with families and difficult times is the need to be sensitive to the atrocities described as well as being able to 'assess the creative adaptation of their utopian refiguration' (19). In this sense they argue, the possibility occurs for wider consideration and discussion of family relationships which affords knowledge of and insights into the world within which we live specifically 'how difference is refracted within both the familiar and alternative social imaginaries they propose' (19).
There Be Dragons Nikki Barrowclough , 1999 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Good Weekend , 21 August 1999; (p. 45,47-48,50)
[Review] Shade's Children Kevin Steinberger , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 41 no. 4 1997; (p. 35)

— Review of Shade's Children Garth Nix , 1997 single work novel
[Review] Shade's Children Michael Gregg , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 12 no. 4 1997; (p. 39)

— Review of Shade's Children Garth Nix , 1997 single work novel
[Review] Shade's Children Lev Lafayette , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: TiconderogaOnline , Winter no. 8 2006;

— Review of Shade's Children Garth Nix , 1997 single work novel
[Review] Shade's Children Carol Townsing , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 20 no. 1 2006; (p. 56)

— Review of Shade's Children Garth Nix , 1997 single work novel
Mutant Fictions Emerge for the Millennium Lucy Sussex , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 14 September 1997; (p. 8)

— Review of Shade's Children Garth Nix , 1997 single work novel
Know the Author : Garth Nix Kerry White , 1997 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 12 no. 4 1997; (p. 10-12)
Garth Nix John Cohen , 1998 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 42 no. 2 1998; (p. 11)
The Theme of Premature Burial in Garth Nix's Early Novels Alice Mills , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers: Explorations into Children's Literature , May vol. 16 no. 1 2006; (p. 51-57)
This article looks at three early novels by Garth Nix, The Ragwitch (1990), Sabriel (1995), Shade's Children (1997) through the context of Freud's 'uncanny' and Carl Jung's work on rebirth and individuation. Tracing the theme of premature burial through the texts, Mills draws together the pessimistic Freudian view of the 'uncanny' and the more positive and heroic path of individuation which Jung put forward, to demonstrate how Nix incoporates these two different understandings of the human psyche into his narratives and manages to attain a level of balance between them both. In terms of premature burial, both Freud and Jung 'agree that the tomb is symbolically the domain of the monstrous mother' and the site where monstrous rebirths occur as well as a site of repression. Mills argues that Nix's novels succeed in blending together two world views and create a truly successful hero, capable of entering the underworld (tomb) and at the same time escaping the paralysis and distintergation of identity that premature burial engenders. (pp.56-57).
New Social Orders : Reconceptualizing Family and Community in Utopian Fiction Kerry Mallan , Clare Bradford , John Stephens , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 15 no. 2 2005; (p. 6-21)
In this collaborative essay, Mallan, Bradford and Stephens interrogate the links between the family, the social well-being of a nation and its individual citizens in conjunction with representations of 'new social orders'(6). They consider how notions of family are developed in selected texts, including Shades Children (Garth Nix) and Boy Overboard (Morris Gleitzman), pointing out that in all three novels, 'various social imaginaries unfold, each gesturing towards a utopian outcome in which family becomes the unifying point for previously isolated or marginalized individuals' (7). For Mallen et al, the challenge in reading utopian novels that deal with families and difficult times is the need to be sensitive to the atrocities described as well as being able to 'assess the creative adaptation of their utopian refiguration' (19). In this sense they argue, the possibility occurs for wider consideration and discussion of family relationships which affords knowledge of and insights into the world within which we live specifically 'how difference is refracted within both the familiar and alternative social imaginaries they propose' (19).
An Eidolon Interview with Garth Nix Steven Paulsen (interviewer), 1996 single work interview
— Appears in: Eidolon : The Journal of Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy , Spring no. 22-23 1996; (p. 33-41)
Garth Nix discusses his career as a writer of science fiction.
Last amended 16 May 2019 14:04:05
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