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y separately published work icon Collected Poems 1930-1965 selected work   poetry   satire   humour  
  • Author:agent A. D. Hope http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/hope-a-d
Issue Details: First known date: 1966... 1966 Collected Poems 1930-1965
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Notes

  • Available as a sound recording.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Angus and Robertson , 1966 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Australiai"A nation of trees, drab green and desolate grey", A. D. Hope , single work poetry (p. 13)
Massacre of the Innocentsi"The big sweet muscles of an athlete's dream", A. D. Hope , single work poetry satire (p. 16)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Includes index.
Alternative title: Collected Poems 1930-1970
Notes:
Revised and expanded ed.

Works about this Work

The Orphic Strain in Australian Poetry Andrew Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refashioning Myth : Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses 2011; (p. 9-27)
'Andrew Johnson argues that "[w]hile poetry in Australia might broadly be read under the aegis of Romanticism, the various Orphic poems could be used as an index of different styles and schools," and claims that "the different approaches and interests of various poets could be measured by their varied responses to the Orphic material." Johnson applies this framework to a close reading of several key Australian poets, including A. D. Hope and the notorious "mythical" poet, Ern Malley.' (Source: Introduction p. 2)
Human Experiences in Most Pictorial Form : A Comparative Study of the Selected Poems of A. D. Hope and Jayanta Mahapatra Tanushree Nayak Patra , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Explorations In Australian Poetry 2010; (p. 139-150)
Tanushree Nayak Patra's essay 'examines comparatively the poetry of A. D. Hope and Jayanta Mahapatra. According to Tanushree, though they belong to different climes and cultures - Australia and India, they have certain points in common while certain others in divergence.' (xii)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Peregrinations of A.D. Hope Peter Steele , 2000 single work essay
— Appears in: The Double Looking Glass : New and Classic Essays on the Poetry of A.D. Hope 2000; (p. 170-180)
y separately published work icon A. D. Hope Robert Darling , New York (City) : Twayne , 1997 Z342920 1997 single work criticism Arguing that Hope's achievements have been neglected in the United States largely because of the poet's defiance of modernist and post-modernist trends, Darling explores the principal themes in Hope's poetry, noting that many of the issues of concern to today's younger poets - a return to narrative, the discursive mode, and traditional form, for instance - have long been apparent in Hope's poetry and criticism. In an illuminating introduction, Darling provides a biographical sketch of his subject, treating Hope's years at Oxford (where he studied under C. L. Wrenn, J. R. R. Tolkien, and C. S. Lewis), his criticism of the Jindyworobak and pseudo-modernist movements, being mentored by the poet James McAuley (then Hope's student), and his encounters with Australia's harsh antiobscenity laws.
Untitled Michael Baldwin , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Books and Bookmen , vol. 12 no. 3 1966; (p. 51-52)

— Review of Collected Poems 1930-1965 A. D. Hope , 1966 selected work poetry
Hope Without Bawd R. F. Brissenden , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Comment , June 1966; (p. 19-20)

— Review of Collected Poems 1930-1965 A. D. Hope , 1966 selected work poetry
Untitled Leon Cantrell , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Poetry Australia , December no. 13 1966; (p. 32-37)

— Review of Collected Poems 1930-1965 A. D. Hope , 1966 selected work poetry
Untitled Laurie Clancy , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Nation , 30 April 1966; (p. 22-23)

— Review of Collected Poems 1930-1965 A. D. Hope , 1966 selected work poetry
Untitled Adrian Colman , 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Poetry Magazine , no. 3 1966; (p. 26-30)

— Review of Collected Poems 1930-1965 A. D. Hope , 1966 selected work poetry
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Human Experiences in Most Pictorial Form : A Comparative Study of the Selected Poems of A. D. Hope and Jayanta Mahapatra Tanushree Nayak Patra , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Explorations In Australian Poetry 2010; (p. 139-150)
Tanushree Nayak Patra's essay 'examines comparatively the poetry of A. D. Hope and Jayanta Mahapatra. According to Tanushree, though they belong to different climes and cultures - Australia and India, they have certain points in common while certain others in divergence.' (xii)
The Orphic Strain in Australian Poetry Andrew Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refashioning Myth : Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses 2011; (p. 9-27)
'Andrew Johnson argues that "[w]hile poetry in Australia might broadly be read under the aegis of Romanticism, the various Orphic poems could be used as an index of different styles and schools," and claims that "the different approaches and interests of various poets could be measured by their varied responses to the Orphic material." Johnson applies this framework to a close reading of several key Australian poets, including A. D. Hope and the notorious "mythical" poet, Ern Malley.' (Source: Introduction p. 2)
Three Faces of Hope Chris Wallace-Crabbe , 1967 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , Summer vol. 26 no. 4 1967; (p. 396-407) Melbourne or the Bush : Essays on Australian Literature and Society 1974; (p. 90-103)
y separately published work icon A. D. Hope Kevin Hart , South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1992 Z90421 1992 single work criticism
Last amended 21 Nov 2006 10:48:11
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