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y separately published work icon The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism anthology   short story   criticism   biography   poetry   prose  
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Nedlands, Inner Perth, Perth, Western Australia,:UWA Publishing , 1998 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Notes Towards an Introduction, Amanda Nettelbeck , 1998 single work criticism (p. 1-17)
The Vernix Mask, Brenda Walker , 1992 single work criticism (p. 19-25)
The Gift, Anna Gibbs , 1998 single work short story (p. 33-44)
Afterword, Anna Gibbs , 1998 single work criticism (p. 45-52)
Lemon Pieces (Quelques Morceaux en Forme de Citron), Noëlle Janaczewska , 1998 single work autobiography (p. 53-68)
Waiting to Dance, Susan Ash , 1994 single work prose (p. 69-73)
Afterword: Dancing with Roland, Susan Ash , 1998 single work criticism
Includes references to Fragments d'un Discours Amoureux by Roland Barthes.
(p. 74-78)
Performing Bodies, Alison Bartlett , 1998 single work criticism (p. 79-88)
Reading Bodies, Alison Bartlett , 1998 single work short story criticism (p. 89-97)
Thaumatropes, Gail Jones , 1998 single work criticism (p. 98-114)
Dr Zeo's Artrageous A-Z of Technosex, Zoe Sofia , 1998 single work short story (p. 129-145)
She Goes Berserk in the Middle of a Sentence, Kerryn Goldsworthy , 1998 single work short story criticism (p. 160-172)
She Goes Berserk in the Middle of a Sentence, Kerryn Goldsworthy , 1998 single work criticism (p. 160-172)
House and Garden, Lucy Dougan , 1998 single work short story biography (p. 201-208)
Sucking on Remembrance: Encounters with the Vampire and Other Histories of the Body, Anne Brewster , 1998 single work short story (p. 209-216)
Telephony or Phoney Telos, Marion Campbell , 1998 single work short story criticism (p. 217-239)
Who Dat Say Who Dat When I Say Who Dat?, Cath Kenneally , 1998 single work biography (p. 240-250)
Speed Kills, Comma, Linda Marie Walker , 1998 single work short story (p. 251-258)
Chair Music, Linda Marie Walker , 1998 single work short story (p. 259-266)
Sailingi"You become a rolling roadblock putting a different spin on", Alison Georgeson , 1995 single work poetry (p. 267-268)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Introduction : From There to Here and Then to Now : A Very Rough Guide Anna Gibbs , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , 17 April no. 17 2013;
'The project represented by this collection of work was conceived in 2009, by Moya Costello who pushed the other editors to act on our previous discussions, as a 'landmark anthology' of Australian women's experimental writing in the vein of the maps made by collections of the 1970s and 1980s: Mother, I'm rooted (edited by Kate Jennings, 1975) which was the first collection of poetry by Australian women, and F(r)ictions (edited by Anna Gibbs and Alison Tilson, 1982)1 . To our dismay, the current state of print publishing in Australia made such an enterprise impossible, as our proposal was rejected everywhere we sent it, mostly it seems because such collections have gone out of favour, at least with publishers. In the face of these refusals, we decided to opt for a journal publication, and this journal, TEXT, the journal of the Association of Australasian Writing Programs, was an obvious choice, since it has a wide - and growing - readership both in (and outside) universities, and, when it comes to experimental writing, teachers are always seeking examples for use in class. Publishing in a journal, however, meant we had to cull all the work which had been previously published, and this means that many writers whose work would otherwise have been part of this collection are not represented here, including some of the major figures in Australian experimental writing (Alexis Wright and Marion May Campbell, to name just two). This collection also has a strong bias towards work from Sydney, Adelaide and Melbourne, mostly by virtue of the locations and histories of its editors, but also because we had almost no response to our call from elsewhere in Australia. Nor is there the avowedly Aboriginal work we had hoped for: again, our own connections were perhaps one limitation, but it is also likely that these writers have other priorities than experimentation (sovereignty and justice, for example) or anthology projects such as this one. The work included here is not blind refereed, but every piece was read and discussed by all four editors, and editorial work of one sort or another was performed on most of the contributions.' (Author's introduction)
Theorising the Madwoman : Fictocritical Incursions - A Performance Laura Deane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'‘Theorising the madwoman : fictocritical incursions - a performance’ is an intervention into the politics of naming and writing about women’s madness in literature. Using fictocritical tactics, this article stages a dialogue between the madwoman and the critic to make visible ‘the fiction of the disembodied scholar’ deployed in textual criticism. Sometimes speaking as the madwoman, sometimes as the feminist critic, I aim to destabilise the voice of the objective scholar, while continuing to lay some claim to it. Polyvocal in arrangement, discordant and offbeat in its strategies, and fictocritical in its tactics and stylistics, this article is an incursion into, rather than an interpretation of, women’s madness. Using a hybrid of fictional strategies, feminist scholarship, and personal experience, I allow the madwoman to interrupt, challenge and resist the interpretive project, by careening into it. Provisional, disorderly and subversive, fictocriticism offers a way of thinking through, rather than thinking about women’s madness. It seems particularly suited to an investigation of the madwoman in literature, as it dramatises the very disorder and instability the madwoman is said to embody.' (Author's abstract)
A Place for the Space Between : Fictocriticism and the University Paul Dawson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 47 no. 2002; (p. 139-151)
'This is an essay about the fictocritical concept of a "space between" the categories of literature and criticism, and the relationship of this metaphorical space to the institutional places in which fictocriticism circulates. The "space between" refers to a space created by the epistemological collapse of critical distance in postmodern theory, a textual no-man's land in which a generic intermingling and hybridity of form takes place.'
Biography : Featuring Female Fictocriticism Donna Coates , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 14 no. 1 2000; (p. 83-84)

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose
Processing Fictocriticism Rosslyn Winifred Prosser , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , April vol. 3 no. 1 1999;

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose
Processing Fictocriticism Rosslyn Winifred Prosser , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , April vol. 3 no. 1 1999;

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose
Between Genres Terri-Ann White , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 206 1998; (p. 21-22)

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose
Untitled Shane Rowlands , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 19 no. 2 1999; (p. 233-235)

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose ; Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Fictocritical Soup Sylvia Martin , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , vol. 11 no. 1999; (p. 8-9)

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose ; Jamming the Machinery : Contemporary Australian Women's Writing Alison Bartlett , 1998 selected work criticism
Biography : Featuring Female Fictocriticism Donna Coates , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 14 no. 1 2000; (p. 83-84)

— Review of The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998 anthology short story criticism biography poetry prose
A Place for the Space Between : Fictocriticism and the University Paul Dawson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 47 no. 2002; (p. 139-151)
'This is an essay about the fictocritical concept of a "space between" the categories of literature and criticism, and the relationship of this metaphorical space to the institutional places in which fictocriticism circulates. The "space between" refers to a space created by the epistemological collapse of critical distance in postmodern theory, a textual no-man's land in which a generic intermingling and hybridity of form takes place.'
Theorising the Madwoman : Fictocritical Incursions - A Performance Laura Deane , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 14 no. 2 2010;
'‘Theorising the madwoman : fictocritical incursions - a performance’ is an intervention into the politics of naming and writing about women’s madness in literature. Using fictocritical tactics, this article stages a dialogue between the madwoman and the critic to make visible ‘the fiction of the disembodied scholar’ deployed in textual criticism. Sometimes speaking as the madwoman, sometimes as the feminist critic, I aim to destabilise the voice of the objective scholar, while continuing to lay some claim to it. Polyvocal in arrangement, discordant and offbeat in its strategies, and fictocritical in its tactics and stylistics, this article is an incursion into, rather than an interpretation of, women’s madness. Using a hybrid of fictional strategies, feminist scholarship, and personal experience, I allow the madwoman to interrupt, challenge and resist the interpretive project, by careening into it. Provisional, disorderly and subversive, fictocriticism offers a way of thinking through, rather than thinking about women’s madness. It seems particularly suited to an investigation of the madwoman in literature, as it dramatises the very disorder and instability the madwoman is said to embody.' (Author's abstract)
Introduction : From There to Here and Then to Now : A Very Rough Guide Anna Gibbs , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , 17 April no. 17 2013;
'The project represented by this collection of work was conceived in 2009, by Moya Costello who pushed the other editors to act on our previous discussions, as a 'landmark anthology' of Australian women's experimental writing in the vein of the maps made by collections of the 1970s and 1980s: Mother, I'm rooted (edited by Kate Jennings, 1975) which was the first collection of poetry by Australian women, and F(r)ictions (edited by Anna Gibbs and Alison Tilson, 1982)1 . To our dismay, the current state of print publishing in Australia made such an enterprise impossible, as our proposal was rejected everywhere we sent it, mostly it seems because such collections have gone out of favour, at least with publishers. In the face of these refusals, we decided to opt for a journal publication, and this journal, TEXT, the journal of the Association of Australasian Writing Programs, was an obvious choice, since it has a wide - and growing - readership both in (and outside) universities, and, when it comes to experimental writing, teachers are always seeking examples for use in class. Publishing in a journal, however, meant we had to cull all the work which had been previously published, and this means that many writers whose work would otherwise have been part of this collection are not represented here, including some of the major figures in Australian experimental writing (Alexis Wright and Marion May Campbell, to name just two). This collection also has a strong bias towards work from Sydney, Adelaide and Melbourne, mostly by virtue of the locations and histories of its editors, but also because we had almost no response to our call from elsewhere in Australia. Nor is there the avowedly Aboriginal work we had hoped for: again, our own connections were perhaps one limitation, but it is also likely that these writers have other priorities than experimentation (sovereignty and justice, for example) or anthology projects such as this one. The work included here is not blind refereed, but every piece was read and discussed by all four editors, and editorial work of one sort or another was performed on most of the contributions.' (Author's introduction)
Notes Towards an Introduction Amanda Nettelbeck , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Space Between : Australian Women Writing Fictocriticism 1998; (p. 1-17)
Last amended 30 Aug 2005 16:00:23
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