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Issue Details: First known date: 1905-1906... 1905-1906 The Lost Earl of Ellan : A Story of Australian Life
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Serialised by: The Age 1854 newspaper (7310 issues)
      1905-1906 .
      Note/s:
      • Serialised in the Age 9 December 1905 - 26 May 1906.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Chatto and Windus ,
      1906 .
      Extent: vii, 398 pp.
      Reprinted: 1908
      Note/s:
      • Includes

        • Vocabulary of Australian Terms (p. vii)
        • 32 pages of publisher's advertising.

Works about this Work

Tropical Flowers : Romancing North Queensland in Early Female Fiction and Poetry Cheryl M. Taylor , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 36 no. 2009; (p. 135-160)
Cheryl Taylor discusses seven female writers who were inspired by and wrote about North Queensland. She concludes, in part, that 'the flower authors see tropical Queensland as a place of liberation for women.... where young female characters assert an identity freed from parental or marital restrictions'.
'Altogether Better-Bred Looking' : Race and Romance in the Australian Novels of Rosa Praed Len Platt , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 31-44)
'This essay connects Praed's writing with late nineteenth and early twentieth century history with particular reference to the race issue. It explores races discourses -- Anglo-Saxonism, Celticism and Social Darwininism -- as thse appear in range of Praed's work and shows how scientific racism shaped Praed's reaction to Black Australia.'
Rosa Praed's Colonial Heroines Michael Sharkey , 1981 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 10 no. 1 1981; (p. 48-56) Who Is She? 1983; (p. 26-36)
Sharkey argues that romance enabled Praed to present the colonial experience from a metropolitan point of view and intelligibly relate the circumstances of women in fronteir society to a European audience. This is achieved by employing a love-theory that declares, in Platonic terms, that for each person there is one who is their perfect match.
Books and Authors 1906 single work column
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 4 August 1906; (p. 20)
'Altogether Better-Bred Looking' : Race and Romance in the Australian Novels of Rosa Praed Len Platt , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 31-44)
'This essay connects Praed's writing with late nineteenth and early twentieth century history with particular reference to the race issue. It explores races discourses -- Anglo-Saxonism, Celticism and Social Darwininism -- as thse appear in range of Praed's work and shows how scientific racism shaped Praed's reaction to Black Australia.'
Books and Authors 1906 single work column
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 4 August 1906; (p. 20)
Tropical Flowers : Romancing North Queensland in Early Female Fiction and Poetry Cheryl M. Taylor , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 36 no. 2009; (p. 135-160)
Cheryl Taylor discusses seven female writers who were inspired by and wrote about North Queensland. She concludes, in part, that 'the flower authors see tropical Queensland as a place of liberation for women.... where young female characters assert an identity freed from parental or marital restrictions'.
Rosa Praed's Colonial Heroines Michael Sharkey , 1981 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 10 no. 1 1981; (p. 48-56) Who Is She? 1983; (p. 26-36)
Sharkey argues that romance enabled Praed to present the colonial experience from a metropolitan point of view and intelligibly relate the circumstances of women in fronteir society to a European audience. This is achieved by employing a love-theory that declares, in Platonic terms, that for each person there is one who is their perfect match.
Last amended 11 Mar 2010 08:05:30
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