Tunnel Vision single work   poetry   "SUPPORT SYD VICIOUS"
Issue Details: First known date: 1984... 1984 Tunnel Vision
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Overland no. 94-95 May 1984 Z600365 1984 periodical issue 1984 pg. 75
  • Appears in:
    y A Dandelion for Van Gogh J. S. Harry , Sydney : Island Press , 1985 Z379366 1985 selected work poetry Sydney : Island Press , 1985 pg. 51-53
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems J. S. Harry , Ringwood : Penguin , 1995 Z186819 1995 selected work poetry humour Ringwood : Penguin , 1995 pg. 216-218
  • Appears in:
    y Bridgings : Readings in Australian Women's Poetry Rose Lucas (editor), Lyn McCredden (editor), South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 Z219096 1996 anthology poetry criticism extract South Melbourne : Oxford University Press , 1996 pg. 95-97
  • Appears in:
    y Harbour City Poems : Sydney in Verse, 1788-2008 Martin Langford (editor), Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 Z1590539 2009 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) 'From colonial origins to vibrant metropolis, Sydney has been portrayed with great liveliness and precision by its poets. This anthology's range extends from the foot of the Blue Mountains through the suburban heartlands to the harbour and the beach, incorporating numerous - and often conflicting - interpretations and images of the city. This is the first collection of Sydney-specific poems for twenty years. It includes such classics as Slessor's "Five Bells" and favourites like "Clancy of the Overflow" as well as a generous selection of very contemporary work and older verse tracing back to the town's verse.' (Publisher's blurb) Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 pg. 101-103

Works about this Work

J S Harry’s ‘Tunnel Vision’, Vicious Sydney and The Car Story David Brooks , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 March vol. 57 no. 1 2017;
'As I began this essay on J S Harry’s poem ‘Tunnel Vision’ several years ago (2006) the radio drive shows in Sydney were full of opinions, mainly angry, concerning a report that a male teacher, in an English class, encouraging students to find as many words in ‘Australia’ as they could, had led the way by showing them how it contains the word ‘slut’, and then, when asked what that meant – it must have been a young primary-school class – had told them that it was a word used to describe women. An hour later I was having lunch with a visiting academic from Jaipur and we spoke about the recent spate of attacks on Indian students in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, and then of the appalling death of an aboriginal elder in the back of a prisoner transport van in Western Australia. No point in claiming that Australia is not a racist country. I did, sometimes, try to claim that, but gave it up long ago. We mask it, that’s all: here on the East Coast we keep much of it beyond the Great Dividing Range, where a lot of other things are kept, out of sight and mind. We then, this Indian academic and I, spoke about Australia’s much-vaunted multiculturalism, its naivety, its need to mature, the stages it has gone through. There is a gap between Australia’s ideas of itself and its reality. A chasm. (Introduction)
J S Harry’s ‘Tunnel Vision’, Vicious Sydney and The Car Story David Brooks , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 March vol. 57 no. 1 2017;
'As I began this essay on J S Harry’s poem ‘Tunnel Vision’ several years ago (2006) the radio drive shows in Sydney were full of opinions, mainly angry, concerning a report that a male teacher, in an English class, encouraging students to find as many words in ‘Australia’ as they could, had led the way by showing them how it contains the word ‘slut’, and then, when asked what that meant – it must have been a young primary-school class – had told them that it was a word used to describe women. An hour later I was having lunch with a visiting academic from Jaipur and we spoke about the recent spate of attacks on Indian students in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, and then of the appalling death of an aboriginal elder in the back of a prisoner transport van in Western Australia. No point in claiming that Australia is not a racist country. I did, sometimes, try to claim that, but gave it up long ago. We mask it, that’s all: here on the East Coast we keep much of it beyond the Great Dividing Range, where a lot of other things are kept, out of sight and mind. We then, this Indian academic and I, spoke about Australia’s much-vaunted multiculturalism, its naivety, its need to mature, the stages it has gone through. There is a gap between Australia’s ideas of itself and its reality. A chasm. (Introduction)
Last amended 21 Sep 2009 09:42:28
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