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Owen Bullock Owen Bullock i(A73675 works by)
Born: Established: 1967 ;
Gender: Male
Visitor assertion Arrived in Australia: ca. 2014
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Works By

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1 Fresh Modes : Towards a Radical Ekphrasis Owen Bullock , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , May vol. 9 no. 1 2019;

'The original poetry in this hybrid critical/creative paper seeks to find acts of making that are equivalent or complementary to those of other art forms and to construct poems which respond not just in their content but in their structures, leading to a radical ekphrasis. It argues that this strategy makes for invigorated writing. The topic of ekphrasis finds numerous references in the literature of the last thirty years, but definitions of ekphrasis have narrowed since the term’s use in ancient times. It now has a particularly close association with the visual arts. It was formerly widely understood as a poetic response to any other form of art (Francis 2009), with no special importance placed on the visual work of art (Webb 2009: 11), but rather with a general ability to make a scene vivid. These poetic experiments attempt to balance the modern impetus to respond ekphrastically with the ancient understanding; they react to works of graphic design, journalism, Indigenous painting, as well as sculpture and installations, and notional ekphrasis. These poetic experiments explore Olson’s dictum that form is never more than an extension of content (1972: 338) and Hejinian’s equally important idea that ‘form is not a fixture but an activity’ (1983), and end by evaluating how the intention to find new structures has affected the content of the poetry.'  (Publication abstract)

1 Reversed i "you were the first to make eye contact", Owen Bullock , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Foam:e , March no. 16 2019;
1 A New Suite : The Process of Knowing through Poetry Owen Bullock , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Text : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , April vol. 23 no. 1 2019;

'This critical/creative work responds to a call from Krauth and Watkins for a more radical form of the scholarly paper. Its hybrid form presents poems written in response to events at the second Poetry on the Move festival at the University of Canberra in 2016. Key ideas about the intersections between poetry and knowledge from David McCooey and William Carlos Williams are considered together with readings and discussions by poets Tusiata Avia and Simon Armitage. The article charts writing experiences, tracking the drafts and the editing process for ways in which my festival-inspired poems reflect on the intersections between poetry and knowledge, knowing and unknowing. Specifically, the poems concern the topics of knowing and observing the world; knowing memory and integrating the past with the present; and knowing the body. They embrace embodiment, imagination and biography, conscious of antagonisms between memory and the present. In this article, I problematise the use of the noun knowledgeas opposed to the verb knowing and demonstrate that the former is unnecessarily privileged. I argue that articulating the full scope of poetry composition from inspiration to the final stages of editing demonstrates that artistic knowledge is best defined as a process of knowing. It is my contention that poets do demonstrate the knowledge of how to make things, as identified by Aristotle (1954); and also that we show ‘knowing as a process of inquiry’ (Johnson 2010). In doing so, we offer readers ‘new ways of knowing and doing’ (Webb 2012, my emphasis). At the same time, our own new work, as I demonstrate here, responds to knowledge as ‘a living current’ (Williams 1923), an active state characterised by the verb ‘to know’.' (Publication abstract)

1 y separately published work icon Summer Haiku Owen Bullock , Canberra : Recent Work Press , 2019 15514396 2019 selected work poetry
1 Reel i "we have to prioritise our tantrums", Owen Bullock , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 November no. 51 2018;
1 Riding i "taking them for a ride", Owen Bullock , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 November no. 51 2018;
1 Originary i "push the noise away", Owen Bullock , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 November no. 51 2018;
1 Pancakes for Neptune Inspired by the Documentary 'Maidentrip' i "I’m making pancakes for Neptune —", Owen Bullock , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , March no. 8 2018;
1 Training i "a line and a smudge", Owen Bullock , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , March no. 8 2018;
1 Talk i "that woman I like at the supermarket", Owen Bullock , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , March no. 8 2018;
1 The Poetic Line : Recent Innovations Owen Bullock , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , May vol. 8 no. 1 2018;

'From Stéphane Mallarmé onwards, the parameters of the line have been manipulated in diverse ways by poets from William Carlos Williams to Charles Olson, Susan Howe and Lyn Hejinian to Michele Leggott, Alan Loney and others. Whether concentrating on the concept of the breath as a defining unit, harnessing a particular speech rhythm or responding to visual prompts – some of which reflect the internet age and new media – the poetic line is neither static nor redundant in contemporary practice. An exploration of poetic structure via the line still offers vital alternatives to prose, as well as sometimes being influenced by it. The use of the line is synonymous with the use of page space and this relationship is commented on by our contributors in diverse and individual ways.' (Introduction)

1 1 y separately published work icon Work and Play Owen Bullock , Canberra : Recent Work Press , 2017 15266397 2017 selected work poetry prose

'In this new collection, Owen Bullock asks 'what constitutes work for someone who must play in order to create?' It's a question addressed through formal contrast, aural unpredictability, and a genuine immersion of all the senses.

'Bullock combines prose and lineated poems with his love of language play, poems found in the fat air of conversation, and the contrasts that memory and experience conjure. With this is a genuine love of whimsy pushed to the absurd, and pushed again into poigniancy.' (Publication summary)

1 UK i "Dunfermline’s like a mini Edinburgh", Owen Bullock , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 August no. 46 2017;
1 Alarms i "I’m a smallish medium", Owen Bullock , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 August no. 46 2017;
1 Shoebox i "notebooks", Owen Bullock , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 May no. 45 2017;
1 Four Chairs i "the general sat in white wicker", Owen Bullock , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 May no. 45 2017;
1 Returning, I Check That Things Remain i "van Gogh’s chair", Owen Bullock , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 May no. 45 2017;
1 From Seam Owen Bullock , 2017 extract prose (SEAM : Prose Poems)
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 46 2017;
1 Erasure and Gift: Alan Loney’s Prose Poetry Owen Bullock , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 46 2017;

'Characteristics of the prose poem emphasised by Stephen Fredman include a focus on language for its own sake, openness and the employment of the long poem. These facets are strongly present in Alan Loney’s prose poem sequences ‘The erasure tapes’ (1994) and ‘Gifts’ (2005). The paper argues that these concepts are intimately connected. It evaluates the link between prose poetry and postmodernism and between language and the idea of open writing as it relates to postmodernism and its appropriation of the long poem. The erasure in question in Loney’s masterwork could be that of memory, meaning, or connection; yet meaning and connectivity are handled differently in the long poem form, and build sense and connection in different ways, through juxtaposition, accumulation and the questioning of perspective in the individual’s response to lang uage and its unavoidable wedding with memory. The prose poem offers a diversity of tools and structures, via the sentence and sentence fragment, supremely useful for practitioners of poetry who wish to extend their range.' (Publication abstract)

1 Aukland Ranges i "the truck throb", Owen Bullock , 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 7 2017;
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