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Pamela Brown Pamela Brown i(A6933 works by) (a.k.a. Pamela Jane Barclay Brown; Pam Brown; Pamela J. B. Brown; Pamela Cocabola Brown)
Also writes as: Pamela Cocabola ; Coca Bola ; 'Eve N. Malley'
Born: Established: 1948 Seymour, Seymour area, Seymour - Kilmore area, Northern Victoria, Victoria, ;
Gender: Female
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Works By

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1 y separately published work icon Pam Brown Pamela Brown , Z925291 website Includes a bibliography, a selection of poetry and links to poems published in online journals.
1 Timing i "Long day’s end closed", Pamela Brown , 2021 single work poetry
— Appears in: Quadrant , April vol. 64 no. 4 2021; (p. 99)
1 Small Blue-Tongue i "I pushed the mower into the grass", Pamela Brown , 2021 single work poetry
— Appears in: Quadrant , April vol. 64 no. 4 2021; (p. 15)
1 y separately published work icon Stasis Shuffle Pamela Brown , Melbourne : Hunter Publishers , 2021 20981636 2021 selected work poetry 'In Stasis Shuffle Pam Brown continues to write a poetry that maps the edges of thought, to think ‘what cannot / be thought’. This collection plays with style and turns its attention to both personal friendships and formal experimentation. The poems are fragmentary and discursive, knowing and wry; bursting with jokes, wordplay, strange observation and striking thoughts that unfold with the sudden joy of discovery. This is a significant new collection by one of Australia’s most influential contemporary poets.' (Publication summary)
1 (Next to Nothing) i "the money printers", Pamela Brown , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 240 2020; (p. 66)
1 (Last Known Location) i "collectives", Pamela Brown , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Stilts , September no. 8 2020;
1 (Lingering) i "don’t want", Pamela Brown , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , October 2020;
1 Pam Brown Reviews Angela Rockel’s Rogue Intensities Pamela Brown , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , October no. 97 and 98 2020;

— Review of Rogue Intensities Angela Rockel , 2019 single work autobiography
1 (Shadow Fold) i "startled out", Pamela Brown , 2020 single work poetry
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 79 no. 3 2020;
1 Pam Brown Reviews Meditations with Passing Water by Jake Goetz Pamela Brown , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , February 2019;

— Review of Meditations with Passing Water Jake Goetz , 2018 selected work poetry
1 (Flix Writer) i "in the meatspace days", Pamela Brown , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Stilts , December no. 6 2019;
1 (Looks Like) i "looks like", Pamela Brown , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Rabbit , no. 28 2019; (p. 26-28)
1 (Next Time) i "a wide line of sunlight", Pamela Brown , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 78 no. 1 2019; (p. 135)
1 (Drinks) i "always a finalist", Pamela Brown , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 78 no. 1 2019; (p. 64-65)
1 Pam Brown Reviews Kait Fenwick Pamela Brown , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 89 2019;

— Review of Burning Between Kait Fenwick , 2018 selected work poetry

'In case you haven’t noticed, there’s a surge in material on gender and sexuality being produced by a profusion of switched-on contemporary thinkers. In Australia, Puncher & Wattmann published the anthology Out of the Box – Contemporary Gay & Lesbian Poets almost a decade ago. Currently you’ll find queer poets (many of them students of writing and literature) swarming around venues like Sydney’s Subbed In, Freda’s and Sappho’s. Literary magazines have published dedicated lgbtqi issues and Melbourne-based Archermagazine declares itself ‘The world’s most inclusive magazine about sexuality, gender and identity’. In 2018 the organisation Australian Poetry hosted lgbtqi Big Bent Readings at the Sydney and Melbourne writer’s festivals. In Cordite Poetry Review, the most recent issue was themed TRANSQUEER.'  (Introduction)

1 [Review] Subtraction Pamela Brown , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 78 no. 2 2018; (p. 206-210)

— Review of Subtraction Fiona Hile , 2016 selected work poetry
1 (Weevils) i "winter started in the dark", Pamela Brown , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 8 no. 2 2018; (p. 116-117)
1 (All You Can Tweet) i "you might call it", Pamela Brown , 2018 single work poetry
— Appears in: Otoliths , 1 August no. 50 2018;
1 4 y separately published work icon Click Here For What We Do Pamela Brown , Sydney : Vagabond Press , 2018 13965575 2018 selected work poetry

'Click here for what we do is a cluster of four loosely connected poems that are not only sceptical of the status quo's serial mendacities and hype but, in a way, they also attempt a coming to terms with the erosion of the idealistic conditions that once made non-mainstream culture, including poetry, so viable and, even, necessary. For Pam Brown writing poetry is a habit, a disorganised ritual. Her poetic inventories begin in everyday bricolage. Real things interrupt the poems the same way thoughts and phrases do. She dismantles monumental intent and then, by mixing (rather than layering), splices the remains into a melange of imagery and thoughtful lyric. Hers is a friendly intelligence that clues in connections to the 'social' as the poems make political and personal associative links. Spurning any lofty design these poems debug the absurdities of contemporary materialism with surreptitious humour. Though disquiet is present it's usually temporary. Here, thinking about the future can be 'trickgensteinian' and yet Pam Brown's poems offer a circumspect optimism.' (Publication summary)

1 Forms of Life for Meaghan Morris Pamela Brown , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , March vol. 24 no. 1 2018; (p. 26–30)

'Meaghan once remarked (I think to the poet and art critic Ken Bolton) that she didn’t like poetry because of all the empty space on the page. A quarter of a century ago in 1992, in Ecstasy and Economics: American Essays for John Forbes, she said she was ‘a desultory reader of poetry’ and that reading poetry might induce a ‘scary cultural estrangement’.  In the foreword, she extrapolates the ‘awkward’ place of poetry in cultural studies then as being more an American problem than an Australian one but nearly a quarter of a century later I wonder if poetry has made an individuated local spot for itself, or even if it cares to. I mean, ‘should poetry worry?’' (Introduction)

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