AustLit logo
Danielle Wood Danielle Wood i(A6471 works by)
Also writes as: Angelica Banks ; Minnie Darke
Born: Established: 1972 Tasmania, ;
Gender: Female
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Works By

Preview all
1 y separately published work icon With Love From Wish and Co Minnie Darke , Melbourne : Michael Joseph , 2022 24503889 2022 single work novel

'From the author of the international bestsellers Star-crossed and The Lost Love Song comes a captivating novel about a young woman whose one little mix-up sets off an unexpected chain of events, with repercussions for her business . . . and her love life.

'With Love from Wish & Co is a heart-warming novel about what we are prepared to give, and give up, in the name of love.

'One little mix-up. That's all it took . . .

'Marnie Fairchild is the brains and talent behind Wish & Co, a boutique store that offers a bespoke gift-buying service to wealthy clients with complicated lives. Brian Charlesworth is Marnie’s most prized customer, and today she’s wrapping the perfect anniversary gift for his wife, Suzanne . . . and a birthday present for his mistress, Leona. What could possibly go wrong?

'For years, Marnie’s had her heart set on moving Wish & Co to the historic shopfront once owned by her grandfather. When the chance to bid for the property unexpectedly arises, Marnie – distracted – makes an uncharacteristic mistake.

'Soon Brian is in a fight to rescue his marriage, and Marnie is scrabbling to keep her dreams alive. And with the situation so complicated, the last thing Marnie needs is to fall for Brian and Suzanne’s son . . .' (Publication summary)

1 Here Passed Your Head Danielle Wood , 2022 single work prose
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 111)
1 The Bowline's Sijo i "My simple dance of rabbit hole, big tree-", Danielle Wood , 2022 single work poetry
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 110)
1 Waterbirth i "For so long as your ribs grow within me, I can believe in a keel of my own.", Danielle Wood , 2022 single work poetry
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 109)
1 Row, Row, Row, Row i "It doesn't take long, Dinah, for a yarn to grow", Danielle Wood , 2022 single work poetry
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 108)
1 Of Course, One Hopes for Happily Ever After i "but...", Danielle Wood , 2022 single work poetry
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 107)
1 Silt Danielle Wood , 2022 single work short story
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 106)
1 Pixie and the Big Storm Danielle Wood , 2022 single work short story
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 105)
1 D-Class Dreams i "Too old to count sheep, Hobart boys", Danielle Wood , 2022 single work poetry
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 104)
1 LUME - Writing from the Collection Danielle Wood , Kate Gordon , 2022 single work essay
— Appears in: Island , no. 164 2022; (p. 103)
1 Novel Ideas : The Books Scott Morrison Should Have on His Summer Reading List Danielle Wood , Eloise Shepherd , Anika Stobart , 2021 single work column
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 4 December 2021;

'Every year Grattan Institute compiles a list of essential reads for the PM. Here’s what it has recommended this time.'

1 The Tale of Lake Pedder Danielle Wood , 2021 single work essay
— Appears in: Meanjin Online 2021; Meanjin , Summer vol. 80 no. 4 2021;

'There are paintings one looks at, or perhaps into, and then there are paintings that one looks through—more like a window or portal. On my dining room wall there hangs such an artwork, a watercolour painted en plein air at Lake Pedder’s beach in the year before I was born. It takes me there, to the place in the dunes where Max Angus sat at his easel and mixed on his palette the dusky mauves and pinks of that legendary sand, and prepared the tiny quantity of smoky blue needed to depict the band of lake water on the horizon. It takes me also to that day in 1971 when Max Angus was painting in the hope that capturing the beauty before him might somehow contribute to its salvation.'  (Introduction)

1 All Kinds of Fur Danielle Wood , 2021 short story
— Appears in: South of the Sun : Australian Fairy Tales for the 21st Century 2021; (p. 138-145)
1 [The Road Back] i "I am young when I see, in a child's encyclopedia, pictures of diving birds - their throats cinched with metal rings - that we are forced to spit their catch into the market", Danielle Wood , 2021 single work poetry art work
— Appears in: Island , no. 162 2021; (p. 102-103)
Art by David Keeling
1 Apple Suite Danielle Wood , 2021 single work prose
— Appears in: Island , no. 161 2021; (p. 94-99)
1 W for Wood Danielle Wood , 2020 single work essay
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , June 2020;

'‘What’s in a name?’ Juliet asks herself while mooning around on her balcony, and the answer she comes up with could be roughly summarised thus: a name probably shouldn’t matter that much, but actually it does. Quite a bit.'  (Introduction)

1 y separately published work icon The Lost Love Song Minnie Darke , Melbourne : Michael Joseph , 2020 18608809 2020 single work novel

'This is the story of a love song . . . And like any good love song, it has two parts.

'In Australia, Arie Johnson waits impatiently for classical pianist Diana Clare to return from a world tour, hopeful that after seven years together she'll finally agree to marry him.

'On her travels, Diana composes a song for Arie. It's the perfect way to express her love, knowing they'll spend their lives together . . . Won't they?

'Then late one night, her love song is overheard, and begins its own journey across the world.

'In Scotland, Evie Greenlees is drifting. It's been years since she left Australia with a backpack, a one-way ticket and a dream of becoming a poet. Now she spends her days making coffee and her nights serving beer. And she's not even sure whether the guy she lives with is really her boyfriend or just a flatmate.

'Then one day she hears an exquisite love song. One that will connect her to a man with a broken heart . . .' (Publication summary)

1 Relinquish i "it is five minutes or less since I was you, pushing away from land in", Danielle Wood , 2019 single work poetry
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 45 no. 1/2 2019; (p. 237, 311)
1 Ambiguous (by) Nature : Writing Baba Yaga and the Tasmanian Devil Danielle Wood , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: ISLE : Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment , Summer vol. 26 no. 3 2019; (p. 768–779)

'In order to provide some context for the following excerpt from my novel-in-progress, “The House on Legs,” let me first share some thoughts about the reasons one might choose to reinvent Baba Yaga, the witch-crone of Russian and Slavic folk tales, as a wildlife warrior in Australia’s island state of Tasmania. Generally, it is accepted that Baba Yaga’s signature trait is her profound ambiguity. Straddling such binaries as good/evil, natural/supernatural, human/nonhuman, she is a character famous for her unpredictability. Should a heroine or hero approach her house on legs, she may help them in their quest. Or, she may attempt to eat them up. Contradiction is a key component of her reputation, and the same can be said of Tasmania, Australia’s island state, and also of that island’s wildlife icon, the Tasmanian devil.' (Introduction)

1 Excerpt from "The House on Legs" Danielle Wood , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Marvels & Tales , vol. 33 no. 1 2019; (p. 167-171)
This contribution is an extract from a longer work of fiction in which the Slavic witch/crone Baba Yaga is transported into a Tasmanian bush setting and into the literary tradition of the Tasmanian Gothic. The work focuses on Baba Yaga's signature quality of ambiguity and demonstrates—through practice—the creative potential of placing a contemporary version of the fairy-tale character in relationship with the marsupial carnivore, the Tasmanian devil. Like Baba Yaga, the Tasmanian devil—demonized for much of the colonized history of Tasmania but increasingly employed as an animal mascot for its island home—has been the subject of widely variant representations. (Source: publisher's abstract).
X