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Kate Fagan Kate Fagan i(A3717 works by)
Born: Established: 1973 ;
Gender: Female
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Works By

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1 Poetry Writing Workshops as ‘True, Impossible Archives’ (or, Teaching as Collaborative Research) Kate Fagan , 2021 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 68 2021;

'In my poetry writing workshops I often teach ‘Wild Flowers’, a stunning poem by Yankunytjatjara author Ali Cobby Eckermann. Several years ago, my first-year students at Western Sydney University were reading ‘Wild Flowers’ alongside ‘Rise Again’ by Palestinian poet Najwan Darwish. One student offered an electrifying reading of Eckermann’s poem that I’ve never forgotten. He began by recalling a trip to Beirut he’d made as a young adult, long after leaving the city as a child and migrating with his family to Western Sydney. How did the city appear to you, I asked? The same, he deadpanned, with more bullet holes.' (Introduction)

1 From : 'Book of Hours for Narrative Lovers i "One. Eventually my eyes convinced me of a", Kate Fagan , 2020 extract poetry
— Appears in: The Anthology of Australian Prose Poetry 2020; (p. 76)
1 Review Short : Philip Mead’s Zanzibar Light Kate Fagan , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , August no. 87 2018;

— Review of Zanzibar Light Philip Mead , 2018 selected work poetry

'For experimental poet and jazz drummer Clark Coolidge, words are never impressions. They are sonic inscriptions, vectors, movable actualities. They alter by degrees in the company of others and in time. I started with Coolidge for many reasons; first among them, his stellar understanding of improvisation.' (Introduction)

1 Shadow the Spring i "The morning is full", Kate Fagan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 75 no. 3 2016; (p. 154)
1 From Song in the Grass Kate Fagan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Active Aesthetics : Contemporary Australian Poetry 2016;
1 Hope Stone Kate Fagan , 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Active Aesthetics : Contemporary Australian Poetry 2016;
1 'The Whole Reflected World Shuddering' : Active Aesthetics and Contemporary Australian Poetry Ann Vickery , Kate Fagan , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Active Aesthetics : Contemporary Australian Poetry 2016; (p. 17-28)
1 On the Occasion of Gig Ryan’s Sixtieth Birthday : A Sapphic Collaboration i "That it's pure, when it comes from their mouth, well I'd", Michael Farrell , Yu Ouyang , Louis Armand , Bonny Cassidy , Kate Lilley , John Hand , Toby Fitch , Tracy Ryan , John Kinsella , Ella O'Keefe , Kate Fagan , Aden Rolfe , Melinda Bufton , Lisa Gorton , Liam Ferney , Ann Vickery , Nguyễn Tiên Hoàng , Corey Wakeling (editor), 2016 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , November 2016; Overland , Summer no. 225 2016; (p. 58)
1 Thinking with Things : Object Habitats and Relational Aesthetics in the Poetry of Astrid Lorange and Pam Brown Kate Fagan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , March no. 2 2015;
'THE WORD ‘habitat’ is associated most often with living matter. Habitats are places of linkage; environments that sustain, and are built by, living things. But what happens when we imagine poems as habitats for any and all things, whether sentient or not? Contemporary Australian poets Astrid Lorange and Pam Brown both write thing-ly poetries. Both display an intense and tender regard for nouns as they verb. Both revel in arrays of lists. In Astrid Lorange’s supercharged works, objects and bodies impress upon and are arranged alongside others in teeming ecologies. Material and conceptual transformations occur as poems enable what literary and cultural theorist John Frow has called “an endless mixing of the properties of persons with the properties of things” (Frow 280) – as figured in Lorange’s poem ‘Wolves are Swarms’...' (Author's introduction)
1 From The Correspondence i "We crossed the seaward field", Kate Fagan , 2014 single work poetry extract
— Appears in: The Turnrow Anthology of Contemporary Australian Poetry 2014; (p. 186)
1 Thinking with Things i "Our time starts now", Kate Fagan , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 216 2014; (p. 105-106)
1 Compost Readymade i "Still asking opposite", Kate Fagan , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Outcrop : Radical Australian Poetry of Land 2013; (p. 166)
1 Poem for J.H. Prynne i "Elementary guards outlandish", Kate Fagan , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Outcrop : Radical Australian Poetry of Land 2013; (p. 162)
1 "A Fluke? [N]ever!" : Reading Chris Edwards Kate Fagan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'This paper investigates the use of collage, mimicry and hieroglyphics by the innovative Australian poet Chris Edwards in his latest book of poetry, People of Earth (Vagabond Press, 2011). With scissors in hand, Edwards goes hunting for Jacques Derrida's "non-phonetic functions" and "operative silences of alphabetic writing", those poetical score-marks that are neither "factual accident nor waste" (Derrida, 'The Pit and the Pyramid'), but rather, endlessly renewable resources. The collagist is a recycler and composter, and also a compositor - a filmic sculptor who tricks visual fragments into new entities. Edwards is a deft and seamless crafter, often producing grammatically flawless collages whose motion from scene to scene is subtle and kaleidoscopic. An appendix to People of Earth compiles hundreds of texts that are sources for Edwards' poems. They are a gentle invitation to detective work, but mostly, a museum of tools tended by a fastidious drafter. This paper will explore the radical materialism of Chris Edwards while invoking along the way the ghosts of Christopher Brennan, Charlie Chaplin, Stéphane Mallarmé and Charles Olson.
1 Luminous i "The way it touches", Kate Fagan , 2012 single work poetry
— Appears in: Fifty-One Contemporary Poets from Australia : Part 4
1 Through a Glass Lightly i "And I heard my Coleridge say, “I am", Kate Fagan , 2012 single work poetry
— Appears in: Fifty-One Contemporary Poets from Australia : Part 4
1 12 y separately published work icon First Light Kate Fagan , Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2012 Z1857344 2012 selected work poetry 'First Light observes the details of the world with curious and restive attention. It explores the threshold between things and words, seeking out places where music and language are equal in charting human experience. Some poems sample from other writers to create new works, often as gifts for friends. Some meditate on the tipping point between poetry and prose, or revisit established forms, such as sonnets and love letters, to stage a conversation between poetry and song. Alongside these more experimental sequences is a series of discrete lyrics, 'Authentic Nature', which responds to specifically Australian habitats - political, cultural and ecological - while asking about the role of 'nature' in poetic writing. First Light is a book of sonic discovery, philosophical insight and formal playfulness; a precise study in the music of thought.' (Publisher's blurb)
1 Workman, Honeyeater i "Yesterday I sat at my desk", Kate Fagan , 2012 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Disappearing 2012; Outcrop : Radical Australian Poetry of Land 2013; (p. 157)
1 Letter XI : Agape (Reprise) i "Where is the sky? My heart is a metal clock", Kate Fagan , 2011 single work poetry
— Appears in: Thirty Australian Poets 2011; (p. 89)
1 A Little Song i "Before the world was blue", Kate Fagan , 2011 single work poetry
— Appears in: Thirty Australian Poets 2011; (p. 86) The Turnrow Anthology of Contemporary Australian Poetry 2014; (p. 186)
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