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Jock Blair Jock Blair i(A34941 works by) (a.k.a. John R.S. Blair; John Blair)
Born: Established: Adelaide, South Australia, ;
Gender: Male
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BiographyHistory

In addition to writing fiction, Jock Blair has also been a television producer and scriptwriter, responsible for a number of serials adapted from works of Australian literature (including The Shiralee by D'Arcy Niland and Robbery under Arms by Rolf Boldrewood, qq.v.).

Most Referenced Works

Awards for Works

form y separately published work icon Stingers ( dir. Julian McSwiney et. al. )agent Australia : Beyond Simpson Le Mesurier Nine Network , 1998-2004 6031565 1998 series - publisher film/TV crime detective

'Inspired by true events, Stingers reveals the shadowy and ambiguous world of undercover cops — people with covert lives and constantly changing identities. They are police who defeat crime from within the criminal world — always without a badge and frequently without protection. The series follows the lives of the operatives as they befriend and betray those on the other side of the law. For these select few, it is a deadly way of life.The undercover cops of Stingers are a unique breed. They must juggle their own lives — love, laughter, family and humanity — with the tension of the criminal personas they adopt in their passion for justice.'

Source: Australian Television Information Archive. (Sighted: 7/6/2013)

nominated Most Outstanding Drama Series
nominated Most Outstanding Drama Series
2001 nominated Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
2005 nominated Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
2003 nominated AFI Awards Australian Film Institute Awards Best Television Drama Series
2004 won AFI Awards Australian Film Institute Awards Best Television Drama Series
2003 nominated Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
2002 nominated Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
form y separately published work icon The Sullivans 1976 Melbourne Australia : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1976-1983 Z1632899 1976 series - publisher film/TV historical fiction war literature

Set in the Melbourne suburb of Camberwell during World War Two, The Sullivans follows the lives of Dave and Grace Sullivan and their children John, Tom, Dave, and Kitty. However, the storylines reach beyond the immediate Sullivan family, allowing viewers to see their extended family, friends, and neighbours also struggle through everyday war-time life.

The series also featured war-action sequences involving various characters. Arguably the most dramatic moment, and the event that effectively became a turning point in the series, was the death of Grace Sullivan in a London air raid. The series finished after a seven-year run, by which point most of the original cast had left the series and the remaining characters had settled into a new life in the post-war era.

1981 winner Logie Awards Special Logie for Sustained Excellence
1980 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Drama Program
1979 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Drama Program
1978 winner Logie Awards Most Popular Drama Program
1977 winner Logie Awards Best New Drama
form y separately published work icon Homicide ( dir. Bruce Ross-Smith et. al. )agent Melbourne : Crawford Productions , 1964-1975 Z1813076 1964 series - publisher film/TV crime detective

Running for twelve years and a total of 510 episodes, Homicide was a seminal Australian police-procedural program, set in the homicide squad of the Victoria Police. According to Don Storey in his Classic Australian Television, it represented a turning point for Australian television, prompting the development of local productions over the purchase of relatively inexpensive American dramas. Indeed, Storey quotes Hector Crawford as saying that his production company intended three outcomes from Homicide: demonstrating that it was possible to make a high-quality local drama series, counteracting criticism of local performers, and showing that Australian audiences would watch Australian-made dramas.

As Moran notes in his Guide to Australian TV Series, the program adopted a narrative structure focusing on crime, detection, and capture, rather than on character studies of the lead detectives. The early episodes were produced by a small crew (Storey notes that the crew was frequently limited to four people: cameraman, grip, director, and assistant director), requiring some degree of ingenuity to achieve a polished result (including, in some cases, the actors performing their own stunts). However, the program received extensive support from the Victoria Police (who recognised, in its positive portrayal of police officers, a valuable public-relations exercise) and, as its popularity grew, from the public.

The program's cast changed extensively over its twelve years on the air, though it remained focused on a small group of male detectives, with the inclusion of irregular characters such as Policewoman Helen Hopgood (played by Derani Scarr), written on an as-required basis to reflect the involvement of women in the police force. In Moran's words, 'The other star of Homicide was the location film work. These ordinary, everyday familiar urban locations were what gave the series a gritty realism and familiarised audiences with the shock of recognition at seeing themselves and their milieus on air'.

1973 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
1971 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
1969 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
1968 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
1967 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
1966 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
1965 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Drama Series
Last amended 17 Apr 2013 10:06:39
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