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Ben Holgate (International) assertion Ben Holgate i(A32256 works by)
Gender: Male
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Works By

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1 Sublime Wilderness : Embracing the Non-Human in Richard Flanagan’s Tasmania Ben Holgate , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate and Crises : Magical Realism as Environmental Discourse 2019; (p. 73-94)
'Narrator Sid Hammet's opening remark in Gould's Book of Fish (2001) encapsulates a recurring theme of Richard Flanagan's fiction: the perception of human existence as something bigger than Western materialism and urban existence, of anthropic life as one element within a profound, mysterious cosmos. Flanagan conveys this transcendental awareness through a style of writing that frequently involves magical realist elements and which is inextricably tied to a philosophy based on ecology and a connection to the Tasmanian landscape, a philosophy influenced by Indigenous Tasmanians and their precolonial culture. In particular, Flanagan blends the magical and the environmental through his persistent leitmotif of wilderness, specifically Tasmania's unique and remote South-West Wilderness.' (Introduction) 
 
1 Expanded Reality : Alexis Wright's Revitalisation of Dreamtime Narratives Ben Holgate , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Climate and Crises : Magical Realism as Environmental Discourse 2019; (p. 42-72)
'Indigenous Australian Alexis Wright's fiction demonstrates how Lawrence Buell's concept of the "environmental unconscious" is a relative term) The collective ideologies and social experiences that shape an individual's perception of the environment vary between people of different societies and cultures. The environmental unconscious, therefore, is a heterogeneous phenomenon rather than a singular, homogeneous one. And, of course, the environment itself — with the definite article — is a relative term, dependent upon the actual geographical locality. Wright's fiction is largely set in Northern Australia, where populations are sparse, and where arid or semi-arid landscapes meet tropical seas. In particular, the backdrop within much of her three novels to date is the Gulf of Carpentaria, from where her family originates, and which is the home of the Waanyi nation. Moreover, Wright imbues her fiction with the Indigenous Australian Dreamtime, a philosophy and spiritual framework that is inextricably connected to the Australian landscape, but which is substantially different from Western philosophies, even ecological ones. In other words, Wright's books are notable for being unlike European or North American fiction in both the geographical environment of their settings and the world view that underpins the narratives.' (Introduction) 
 
1 1 y separately published work icon Climate and Crises : Magical Realism as Environmental Discourse Ben Holgate , London : Routledge , 2019 19774938 2019 multi chapter work criticism

'Climate and Crises: Magical Realism as Environmental Discourse makes a dual intervention in both world literature and ecocriticism by examining magical realism as an international style of writing that has long-standing links with environmental literature. The book argues that, in the era of climate change when humans are facing the prospect of species extinction, new ideas and new forms of expression are required to address what the novelist Amitav Gosh calls a "crisis of imagination." Magical realism enables writers to portray alternative intellectual paradigms, ontologies and epistemologies that typically contest the scientific rationalism derived from the European Enlightenment, and the exploitation of natural resources associated with both capitalism and imperialism. Climate and Crises explores the overlaps between magical realism and environmental literature, including their respective transgressive natures that dismantle binaries (such as human and non-human), a shared biocentric perspective that focuses on the inter-connectedness of all things in the universe, and, frequently, a critique of postcolonial legacies in formerly colonised territories. The book also challenges conventional conceptions of magical realism, arguing they are often influenced by a geographic bias in the construction of the orthodox global canon, and instead examines contemporary fiction from Asia (including China) and Australasia, two regions that have been largely neglected by scholarship of the narrative mode. As a result, the monograph modifies and expands our ideas of what magical realist fiction is.' (Publication summary)

1 Greening a Narrative Mode: Antipodean Magical Realism and Ecocriticism in Richard Flanagan's Fiction Ben Holgate , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Richard Flanagan : Critical Essays 2018; (p. 43-57)
1 Unsettling Narratives : Re-Evaluating Magical Realism as Postcolonial Discourse through Alexis Wright's Carpetaria and The Swan Book Ben Holgate , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , vol. 51 no. 6 2015; (p. 634-647)
'Indigenous Australian author Alexis Wright develops magical realism in new directions by drawing on Aboriginal mythology, spirituality and traditional oral storytelling techniques. A critical difference between Wright’s novels Carpentaria and The Swan Book and other postcolonial magical realism, however, is that the author regards Indigenous Australians as still being colonized, even though Australia is officially a decolonized nation. Wright’s view reflects what Robert Young calls the “fourth world”, where in an officially decolonized country there is still colonization of first inhabitants, “who seek the basic rights of legal and social equality”. This scenario prompts a modification of Stephen Slemon’s influential theory of magical realism as postcolonial discourse: that the narrative mode involves two oppositional systems locked in a continuous battle with one another, the magical and the real, usually taken to mean the colonized and the colonizer. Instead, the article proposes that magical realist fiction which portrays ongoing colonization in a supposedly postcolonial nation incorporates three oppositional systems: the Indigenous colonized; the white settler colonizer; and global economic forces that help perpetuate the ongoing colonization.' (Source: Abstract)
1 Developing Magical Realism’s Irony in Gould’s Book of Fish Ben Holgate , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 5 2014;

'Irony is an underlying factor of magical realist fiction. Richard Flanagan’s novel Gould’s Book of Fish (2001) is imbued with a particular kind of irony that results from a gap between a contemporary reader’s lament for a lost pre-modern world, that of Indigenous Tasmanians, and the book’s eponymous nineteenth-century narrator’s rage about the disappearance of that culture, one which the British convict cannot fully comprehend. Flanagan exploits and plays with this irony by using a range of epistemological magical realist techniques and associated metafictional devices. This enables Flanagan to navigate around his position as a white settler author to indirectly portray Tasmanian pre-colonial society. The novel creates a second type of irony by attacking the European Enlightenment as being a tool for imperialist domination and the subjugation of Indigenous societies, while at the same time the text upholds the Enlightenment’s humanitarian ideals. Gould’s Book of Fish, therefore, plays a critical role in the development of magical realism in contemporary Australian fiction.' (Publication abstract)

1 Face to Face with the Workers Ben Holgate , 1999 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 26 April 1999; (p. 18)
1 Back to Class Acts Ben Holgate , 1999 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Australian , 22 January 1999; (p. 16)
1 Exit, Stage Left Ben Holgate , 1999 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 13-14 November 1999; (p. 22-23)
1 Sound of One Agitator Clapping Ben Holgate , 1998 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Australian , 24 April 1998; (p. 11)
1 Williamson's Out to Remove Any Doubts Catherine Taylor , Ben Holgate , 1998 single work biography
— Appears in: The Australian , 28 April 1998; (p. 3)
1 The Sharks are Circling in the Dark Pool of Peers Ben Holgate , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 September 1995; (p. 15)
1 McPhee : Grants and That Speech Valerie Lawson , Ben Holgate , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 September 1995; (p. 17)
1 A Culture Still Trying to Cure its Pimples Ben Holgate , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 29 September 1995; (p. 17)
1 Fellowship Boost for 10 Creative Artists Ben Holgate , Peter Cochrane , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 November 1995; (p. 15)
1 McPhee Backlash: Let the Poison Darts Fly Ben Holgate , Ava Hubble , Valerie Lawson , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 31 August 1995; (p. 19)
1 The Keatings in Suspense Brook Turner , Ben Holgate , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 July 1995; (p. 15)
1 Priscilla Sets the Fashion for Film Festival Opening Ben Holgate , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 16 May 1995; (p. 5)
1 Film Industry Awards Come Under Heavy Fire Ben Holgate , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 November 1994; (p. 20)
1 Muriel Squeezes Past Bad Boy, Leaving Priscilla in the Desert Ben Holgate , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 5 November 1994; (p. 4)
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