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L. L. Woolacott L. L. Woolacott i(A31195 works by) (birth name: Leslie Lovel Woolacott) (a.k.a. L. L. W.)
Also writes as: V. C. West ; Errol Tennant
Born: Established: 1885 Petersham, Marrickville - Camperdown area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales, ; Died: Ceased: 1961 Dubbo, Dubbo area, Wellington - Dubbo - Narromine area, Central West NSW, New South Wales,
Gender: Male
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1 2 Australian plays L. L. Woolacott , 1945 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin Papers , Autumn vol. 4 no. 1 1945;
1 Woolacott in reply to Rees L. L. Woolacott , 1945 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Meanjin Papers , Spring vol. 4 no. 3 1945; (p. 220-221)
1 1 y separately published work icon Playwriting : An Unconventional Text-Book L. L. Woolacott , Sydney : Currawong , 1942 Z821817 1942 single work criticism Discusses the art and craft of play writing.
1 y separately published work icon The Garage Skeleton V. C. West , Sydney : Currawong , 1941 Z1509180 1941 single work novella crime detective
1 y separately published work icon Dream Woman V. C. West , Sydney : Currawong , 1940-1949 Z1683782 1940-1949 single work novel
1 No Conveniences V. C. West , 1936 single work short story humour
— Appears in: Flame , September vol. 1 no. 2 1936; (p. 38-41)
After lobbying for, and achieving, 'progess' in his quiet Sydney suburb, Jimmy Priddicombe discovers there was something to be said for a peaceable existence after all.
1 A Forecast L. L. Woolacott , 1936 single work prose humour
— Appears in: Flame , August vol. 1 no. 1 1936; (p. 59)
Humorous sketch about authors' reactions to the editorial policies of a new literary magazine.
1 Deception V. C. West , 1936 single work short story
— Appears in: Flame , August vol. 1 no. 1 1936; (p. 54-57)
1 Editorial L. L. Woolacott , 1936 single work prose
— Appears in: Flame , August vol. 1 no. 1 1936; (p. 3)

In his editorial for the first issue of Flame, Woolacott describes it as 'an attempt to give the Australian nation a monthly journal filled entirely with short stories from the pens of resident writers .... No overseas syndicated work, brought into the country with the connivance of our patriotic federal Govenmant, will appear. If Australian writers now overseas care to send us their work it will be accepted and paid for, if it be good enough, but not through any syndication agency bent on making money at the combined expense of resident writers and the Australian public. Both the writers and the public, we hope, will remember that "Flame" is the only fiction magazine published in their country without advantage being taken of the cheap syndicated stuff that may be bought by any newspaper or magazine proprietor for a few shillings. We can hardly blame the agents for selling overseas fiction while the public will read it. We believe however, that it is high time for the public, and the Federal Government, to recognise the fact that writers in this new country must be encouraged in the only practical way, namely, by giving them the opportunity to market their work at decent prices. "Flame" provides that opportunity. If a sufficient number of Australian patronise it, the deluge of overseas stuff will be lessened. If a large army of Australians supports "Flame" consistently, the magazine will make Australian literary history by forcing the Federal Government to keep out a big proportion of the stuff. What is more, if "Flame" flourishes, its writers will flourish with it. Our fees to authors will go up a our revenue increases' (Flame 1.1, 1936, p.64).

Woolacott outlines the editorial policy that Flame will follow as part of its aim of providing entertainment for a wide readership: 'a precious literary style is not demanded' and if 'a superior, sniffish tone towards people who are not "literary" is detected in any manuscript, it will be promptly rejected '; Australian settings were seen as 'desirable but not obligatory.

The first issue also advertised competitions for readers with prize money totalling sixty-five pounds ten shillings: the entrants were required to answer questions about language used in the stories and to list stories in order of appeal.

1 y separately published work icon Flame L. L. Woolacott (editor), Barrie Braddock (editor), Barrie Braddock (editor), Sydney : Australian Industry , 1936 Z1688090 1936 periodical (4 issues)

In his editorial for the first issue of Flame, Woolacott describes it as 'an attempt to give the Australian nation a monthly journal filled entirely with short stories from the pens of resident writers .... No overseas syndicated work, brought into the country with the connivance of our patriotic Federal Government, will appear. If Australian writers now overseas care to send us their work it will be accepted and paid for, if it be good enough, but not through any syndication agency bent on making money at the combined expense of resident writers and the Australian public. Both the writers and the public, we hope, will remember that "Flame" is the only fiction magazine published in their country without advantage being taken of the cheap syndicated stuff that may be bought by any newspaper or magazine proprietor for a few shillings. We can hardly blame the agents for selling overseas fiction while the public will read it. We believe however, that it is high time for the public, and the Federal Government, to recognise the fact that writers in this new country must be encouraged in the only practical way, namely, by giving them the opportunity to market their work at decent prices. "Flame" provides that opportunity. If a sufficient number of Australians patronise it, the deluge of overseas stuff will be lessened. If a large army of Australians supports "Flame" consistently, the magazine will make Australian literary history by forcing the Federal Government to keep out a big proportion of the stuff. What is more, if "Flame" flourishes, its writers will flourish with it. Our fees to authors will go up as our revenue increases' (Flame 1.1, 1936, p.64).


Woolacott outlines the editorial policy that Flame will follow as part of its aim of providing entertainment for a wide readership: 'a precious literary style is not demanded' and if 'a superior, sniffish tone towards people who are not "literary" is detected in any manuscript, it will be promptly rejected '; Australian settings were seen as 'desirable but not obligatory'.


The first issue also advertised competitions for readers with prize money totalling sixty-five pounds ten shillings: the entrants were required to answer questions about language used in the stories and to list stories in order of appeal.

1 The Making of an Actress L. L. Woolacott , 1934 single work essay
— Appears in: To-Day , 1 May 1934; (p. 22, 24)
Essay is about the actress, Jean Elwing, who was born in Rockhampton and whose father was a journalist in Charters Towers.
1 Two on a Hill L. L. Woolacott , 1930 single work short story
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 15 April vol. 6 no. 21 1930; (p. 8, 82 - 83)
A man and a woman meet in the moonlight at the place where they parted after a quarrel eighteen years before.
1 The Cure L. L. Woolacott , 1930 single work short story
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 1 January vol. 51 no. 2603 1930; (p. 46)
1 Deliverance : a play Errol Tennant , 1927 single work drama
1 The Eternal Quadrilateral L. L. Woolacott , 1926 single work drama
— Appears in: The Triad , 1 July 1926; (p. 14-15)
1 The Eternal Quadrilateral : A Study in Sincerity L. L. Woolacott , 1926 single work drama
1 Written for the Films L. L. Woolacott , 1925 single work review
— Appears in: The Triad , 2 March 1925; (p. 42)

— Review of Rose of Spadgers : A Sequel to "Ginger Mick" C. J. Dennis , 1924 selected work poetry
1 The Perfect Gentleman L. L. Woolacott , 1924 single work short story
— Appears in: The Triad , 1 December 1924; (p. 3-6)
1 East is East : A Melbourne Glimpse L. L. Woolacott , C.D. , 1922 single work short story
— Appears in: The Triad , 11 December 1922; (p. 64-65)
1 The Traitor L. L. Woolacott , 1921 single work drama
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