AustLit logo
Sue Joseph Sue Joseph i(A151214 works by)
Gender: Female
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Works By

Preview all
1 Post Scriptum Sue Joseph , 2020 single work prose
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 58 2020;
1 Dear Julia Sue Joseph , 2020 single work prose
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 58 2020;
1 ‘Who Are You to Judge My Writing?’ : Student Collaboration in the Co-construction of Assessment Rubrics Sue Joseph , Carolyn Rickett , Maria Northcote, , Beverly J Christian , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Writing , vol. 17 no. 1 2020; (p. 31-49)

'Collaborative models of involving students in the co-construction of assessment rubrics are rare. Inviting students to take part actively in the design of assessment rubrics is one method of filling this research gap, potentially garnering a shared understanding of assessment requirements. Rubrics traditionally are constructed by educators, based on set criteria, in order to streamline grading more cohesively and equitably. But research demonstrates that assessment rubric use is usually of more benefit to the educator in grading, than to the student in undertaking the assessment task – the educator understands requirements but often specific requirements are not clear to the student. Using a multiple case study research approach which incorporated a modified Delphi method to gather expert views on rubrics, the study outlined in this paper explores the outcomes of collaborating with creative writing students at the rubric design stage of the assessment process. This paper discusses the rubric co-construction process facilitated by a writing lecturer and a team of students from one university who took part in collaborating and developing a creative writing assessment rubric. The processes adopted to implement this co-construction process are reported, the products of which were distributed to a 250-student cohort and reflects on the value of this pedagogical innovation.' (Publication abstract)

 

 

1 Suspension . . . . . . the State in Which the Particles of a Substance Are Mixed with a Fluid but Are Undissolved; the State of Being Suspended Sue Joseph , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 33 no. 1 2019; (p. 149-163)
1 Disappearing Sue Joseph , 2019 single work prose
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , December vol. 9 no. 2 2019;
1 Peripheries and Praxis : The Effect of Rubric Co-construction on Student Perceptions of Their Learning Carolyn Rickett , Sue Joseph , Maria Northcote, , Beverly J Christian , John Seddon , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 57 2019;
'The construction of assessment rubrics is often educator-centric as lecturers work in isolation to compose grading tools. While there is a pedagogical goal to construct instruments that align with learning outcomes and guide the assessment of students’ learning, students are often at the periphery of this process. In many higher education institutions, students are accustomed to receiving assessment feedback but they are not, typically, active participants in the feedback cycle. Increasingly, institutions are seeking evidence of greater student engagement in their tertiary learning experience. Accordingly, academics seek to innovate practice and enhance curricula by creating more opportunities for student involvement, thus creating a shared understanding of it and associated assessment tasks. Responding to a gap in rubric construction practice, this paper discusses an Office for Learning and Teaching Innovation and Development Grant research project where students moved from being rubric users to being central participants in collaborative design. Drawing on data collected from a team of rubric co-constructors from one Sydney university campus – first year students and an academic in a creative non-fiction writing subject – we set out to answer the following question: What effect does the co-construction and use of rubrics have on students’ perceptions of their learning?' (Publication abstract)
 
1 Locating Poems inside the Quotidian : Finding Poetry in Ordinary Language Sue Joseph , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Axon : Creative Explorations , May vol. 9 no. 1 2019;

'Found poetry borrows from other writers – from different writings, artefacts, and sources – always attributing and referencing accurately. In this paper, regional daily newspapers and their front page headlines are privileged as primary texts, the Found Poetry performing as nonfiction lyrical collage, with applied rules, nestling beside them.

'Considering the notion that contemporary poetry ‘inhabits language’, this paper uses three forms of Found Poetry – erasure, free-form and research – to test and demonstrate both literally and metaphorically, its veracity. Implicitly nonfiction, these poems create a nuanced and rhythmic lineated transcript of Australian life, derived from regional legacy newspapers, while they endure. Furthermore, using a comparative textual method, the aesthetics of Found Poetry is established visually.

'This paper is the second in a series derived from the beginnings of a research project into Australian legacy newspaper stories and Found Poetry. The first was a sequence of prose poems; this second collection is lineated and contributes to the notion of poetry mediating and enriching our understanding of the reality of the everyday.' (Publication abstract)

1 Leigh Sales, Ordinary Days and Crafting Empathy ‘Between the Lines’ Sue Joseph , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 6 May 2019;

'Why do we tell stories, and how are they crafted? In a new series, we unpick the work of the writer on both page and screen.'

1 y separately published work icon Mediating Memory : Tracing the Limits of Memoir Bunty Avieson (editor), Fiona Giles (editor), Sue Joseph (editor), London : Routledge , 2017 13603154 2017 anthology criticism

'The argument has been made that memoir reflects and augments the narcissistic tendencies of our neo-liberal age. The Literature of Remembering: Tracing the Limits of Memoir [sic] challenges and dismantles that assumption. Focusing on the history, theory and practice of memoir writing, editors Bunty Avieson, Fiona Giles and Sue Joseph provide a thorough and cutting-edge examination of memoir through the lenses of ethics, practice and innovation. By investigating memoir across cultural boundaries, in its various guises, and tracing its limits, the editors convincingly demonstrate the plurality of ways in which memoir is helping us make sense of who we are, who we were and the influences that shape us along the way.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

1 Found Poetry as Literary Cartography : Mapping Australia with Prose Poems Sue Joseph , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 46 2017;

'Found poetry is lyrical collage, with rules. Borrowing from other writers – from different writings, artefacts, sources – it must always attribute and reference accurately. This paper is derived from the beginnings of a research project into Australian legacy newspaper stories and found poetry as prose poetry, explaining the rationale behind the bigger project. Ethnographic in texture at its edges, the research project sets out to create poetic renditions of regional news of the day, circumnavigating the continent. My aim is to produce a cadenced and lyrical nonfiction transcript of Australian life, inspired by and appropriated from regional legacy media, while it still exists.

'The beginning of the research was a recce journey to the centre of Australia in 2016. Currently, the outcomes of the recce are six poems, five of which are nonfiction prose poems. Contextualising found poetry within the prose poetry genre – a long debated and hybrid space – the theoretical elements of this paper underpin its creative offerings.' (Publication abstract)

1 Beyond This Point Here Be Dragons : Consideration and Caution for Supervising HDR Writing Trauma Projects Carolyn Rickett , Sue Joseph , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , no. 42 2017;

'As memoir and autobiographical/autoethnographic texts flourish in the market place, so this emergence is reflected in the tertiary education sector. Mostly sited within journalism, English and creative writing schools, a proportion of these texts incorporate trauma narrative as students turn to creative practice degrees as a means to write through disruptive autobiographical events. 

'Accordingly, supervisors of HDR candidates undertaking long form trauma narrative find themselves more and more immersed in the trauma, bearing witness to their students’ potential unease. We argue that this type of supervision may potentially necessitate a differentiated management approach, with the establishment of additional protocols, informed by the potential dangers of re-traumatisation of the candidate; and vicarious traumatisation of the supervisor.

'The aim of this paper is to report on some of the preliminary findings of a qualitative research project where a range of Australian academics supervising Higher Degree Research (HDR) candidates writing about traumatic experiences were interviewed regarding supervisory protocols and practices.2 Here we focus on selected insights from supervisors who responded to one of the interview questions: ‘what do you consider the potential risks for a student and a supervisor involved in HDR projects framed by trauma narrative?’ We anticipate this paper will provide helpful perspectives from experienced academics for early career supervisors about to embark on trauma shaped projects.' (Publication abstract)

1 The Essay as Polemical Performance : ‘Salted Genitalia’ and the ‘Gender Card’ Sue Joseph , 2017 single work
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , no. 39 2017;

'On October 9, 2012, the then Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard rose to her feet in Canberra’s Parliament House, and, in response to a motion tabled by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott, delivered her blistering Misogyny Speech. Although Gillard’s speech was met with cynicism by the Australian Press Gallery, some accusing her of playing the ‘gender card’, it reverberated around the world and when the international coverage poured back into the country, many Australians stood up and listened.

'One of them was author, essayist, classical concert pianist and mother, Anna Goldsworthy.

'Shortly after the delivery of The Misogyny Speech, Quarterly Essay editor Chris Feik approached Goldsworthy to write the 50th essay for the Black Inc. publication with his idea to view this event through a cultural lens. It took several months to research and compose the characteristically long-form (25,000 word) essay that Quarterly Essay publishes every three months as a single volume; ‘Unfinished Business: Sex, Freedom and Misogyny’ was launched at the Wheeler Centre in Melbourne on July 1, 2013, five days after Julia Gillard was deposed from her prime ministership by Kevin Rudd.

'This paper takes a look back at the 50th issue of the Quarterly Essay, to discuss with its author her essay-writing process and the aftermath of publication. Goldsworthy is erudite as she looks at the construction of the essay, its contents, and her love of essay writing. Although she confesses to not having a definition for the form, she believes it does not matter; that its fluidity is a basic constituent element. Her love of language and music inform both the breadth of her essay, as well as its narrative – there is lyricism to her sentences and a musicality to her structure.

'This paper also contextualises ‘Unfinished Business’ as an example of the crucial longform essay contribution that Black Inc.’s Quarterly Essay performs in the Australian literary/political/cultural/intellectual environment. There were critics of Goldsworthy’s essay, and these are assessed as a component of how ‘the essay’ potentially can function in a liberal First-World society, as demonstrated by the Quarterly Essay periodical.'(Introduction)

1 Guiding Life Writers : the Supervision of Creative Doctoral Work Interrogating Personal Trauma Sue Joseph , Freya Latona , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Writing , January vol. 14 no. 1 2017; (p. 23-35)
'There exists much literature on the student and doctoral candidate relationship across the disciplines. However, there is a gap in understanding this crucial dynamic in the context of creative practices, and an even more pronounced gap interrogating the supervisor to candidate dynamic when a student is conducting life-writing involving personal trauma. Despite this, more and more universities are opening their doors to these types of research projects. In 2014, a final year doctoral candidate in life-writing and her supervisor conducted a mini research project about their experience of supervision. The crux of their investigation hinged on the relatively nuanced requirements of supervision when the candidate is writing about personally traumatic themes in their dissertation. By combining their analysis of their real experiences as supervisor and candidate, and pre-existing academic thought on both the requirements of supervision and the differing needs of post-trauma students, the authors seek to contribute to the growing canon within the creative practices on supervisor/candidate relationships, as well as the relatively fraught ethics of the commodification of life experiences within tertiary institutions.' (Publication abstract)
1 1 y separately published work icon Behind the Text : Candid Conversations with Australian Creative Nonfiction Writers Sue Joseph (interviewer), Ormond : Hybrid , 2016 9695871 2016 selected work interview

'Behind the Text is a celebration of the often forgotten genre of creative nonfiction. Paired with Joseph’s rich descriptions of person and place, this collection of candid interviews brings together some of the best Australian authors, covering everything from traumatic wartime journalism and burning national issues to Middle Eastern spices. In this definitive work, eleven influential authors explore their writing process, ethical dilemmas and connection to the capacious genre. As the first collection of its kind, this work brings Australian creative nonfiction into the literary spotlight.' (Publication summary)

1 Anna Goldsworthy Sue Joseph (interviewer), 2016 single work interview
— Appears in: Behind the Text : Candid Conversations with Australian Creative Nonfiction Writers 2016;
1 Estelle Blackburn Sue Joseph (interviewer), 2016 single work interview
— Appears in: Behind the Text : Candid Conversations with Australian Creative Nonfiction Writers 2016;
1 Greg Bearup Sue Joseph (interviewer), 2016 single work interview
— Appears in: Behind the Text : Candid Conversations with Australian Creative Nonfiction Writers 2016;
1 Margaret Simons Sue Joseph (interviewer), 2016 single work interview
— Appears in: Behind the Text : Candid Conversations with Australian Creative Nonfiction Writers 2016;
1 John Dale Sue Joseph (interviewer), 2016 single work interview
— Appears in: Behind the Text : Candid Conversations with Australian Creative Nonfiction Writers 2016;
1 Kate Holden Sue Joseph (interviewer), 2016 single work interview
— Appears in: Behind the Text : Candid Conversations with Australian Creative Nonfiction Writers 2016;
X