AustLit logo
Rachael Mead Rachael Mead i(A101853 works by)
Gender: Female
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

BiographyHistory

Rachael Mead has worked as an archaeologist, environmental campaigner, wedding decorator and bookshop manager. She holds an Honours degree in Classical Archaeology, a Masters in Environmental Studies and a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Adelaide.

As well as numerous individual poems published in a range of Australian periodicals, she has published two collections of her poetry: The Sixth Creek (2013) and The Quiet Blue World (2015).

Most Referenced Works

Personal Awards

2019 winner The Booranga Prize The Booranga Prize for Fiction for 'The Bouncer and the Blood Clot'.
2016 shortlisted Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature Wakefield Press Unpublished Manuscript Award for Vintage Rain
2015 recipient Varuna Fellowships Dorothy Hewett Flagship Fellowship for A Field Guide to Fire - A poetry collection exploring the way human relationships with nature transform when we are in transit or when we perceive threat.

Awards for Works

y separately published work icon The Flaw in the Pattern Nedlands : UWA Publishing , 2018 13858268 2018 selected work poetry

'This is an alive, refreshing and, quite literally, elemental book of water and skin, muscle and fire. Rachael Mead’s poems are immediate and grounded whilst entwined with fragility and struggle. They don’t shy from the difficulties and sadness as well as joy in human kinship. Along the way Mead offers us a clear-eyed self-consciousness of the human within the larger places of the earth, in this case places such as Antarctica, Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre, Ikara–Flinders Ranges. The book offers us an embodied sense of secular ritual in its attentiveness and its use of form – lists, lyric iterations, admonitions - as the poet both argues and confides with herself and us, about the wild pleasures of earth’s physical and emotional topographies, and of our responsibilities within all this. A powerful and invigorating book of journeys well worth taking.

'JILL JONES' 

2016 shortlisted Dorothy Hewett Award for an Unpublished Manuscript
Adoption Day 1978 i "I remember my cream polo-neck was itchy as hell", 2017 single work poetry
— Appears in: Irises : The University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor's International Poetry Prize 2017 2017; (p. 59)
2017 longlisted The University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor’s International Poetry Prize
Last amended 9 Dec 2019 11:06:38
Other mentions of "" in AustLit:
    X