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Beejay Silcox Beejay Silcox i(9783403 works by)
Gender: Female
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Works By

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1 At the End of the Line Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Griffith Review , no. 74 2021;
1 y separately published work icon On Louise Milligan : Beejay Silcox Reviews the 'Bruised and Bruising' Witness Beejay Silcox (presenter), Southbank : Australian Book Review, Inc. , 2021 23440618 2021 single work podcast

'In the wake of Brittany Higgins's startling allegations of sexual abuse in Parliament House, Beejay Silcox revisits her review of Witness by award-winning journalist Louise Milligan. Witness (recently shortlisted in the 2021 Stella Prize) is an interrogative critique of the criminal trial process. It is the culmination of five years of research into how witnesses are treated (and often intimidated or worse) in court rooms.' (Production summary)

1 With Two Stories and Two Front Covers, the Reader Chooses Where to Start : In France in the Past, or in a Dystopian Australian Future Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 19 October 2021;

— Review of Scary Monsters Michelle De Kretser , 2021 single work novel

'With two stories and two front covers, the reader chooses where to start: in France in the past, or in a dystopian Australian future' 

1 Apples Never Fall by Liane Moriarty Review : Overgarnished but Pyrotechnic Family Drama Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 17 September 2021;

— Review of Apples Never Fall Liane Moriarty , 2021 single work novel
1 Monsters: A Reckoning by Alison Croggon Review : Beware the Many-tentacled Beast of Empire Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 12 March 2021;

— Review of Monsters Alison Croggon , 2021 single work autobiography essay
1 Scattergun Approach Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 4 September 2021; (p. 16)

— Review of I Shot the Devil Ruth McIver , 2021 single work novel
1 Riding Out the Storm Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 31 July 2021; (p. 17)

— Review of Fury Kathryn Heyman , 2021 single work autobiography

'In her early 20s, Kathryn Heyman spent a season aboard a six-berth fishing trawler, Ocean Thief, that was scouring the Gulf of Carpentaria for tiger prawns. She’d hitchhiked up the coast from Sydney with a handful of clothes, a flick-knife she didn’t know how to use, and 10kg of books. It was an escape plan without a plan: “I had no deadline, no outcome, no-one waiting,” Heyman explains in Fury. “There was no-one to care for me, only myself, and I had never learned the lessons of caring.” She arrived on deck as Kacey, an untested galley cook who couldn’t fry an egg; she left as Kathryn, a toil-hardened deckhand. It was a transformation – a strengthening – that made other transformations possible.' (Introduction)

1 y separately published work icon Krissy Kneen in Conversation with Beejay Silcox : On The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen Beejay Silcox (presenter), Southbank : Australian Book Review, Inc. , 2021 21871734 2021 single work podcast 'Throughout her childhood, Krissy Kneen was surrounded by make-believe. At the centre of this enchanted world was her grandmother Lotty, whose prodigious fabulations not only kept her family in thrall, but also hid painful memories of poverty and forced migration. In her new memoir, The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen, Kneen retraces her grandmother's journey from Slovenia to Australia. In today's episode, Kneen sits down with her friend Beejay Silcox, a past ABR Fellow and longtime contributor, to discuss their serendipitous meeting and Kneen's journey to uncover her family's history. ' (Production introduction)
1 Bila Yarrudhanggalangdhuray by Anita Heiss Review – A Mighty and Generous Heartsong Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 21 May 2021;

— Review of Bila Yarrudhanggalangdhuray Anita Heiss , 2021 single work novel

'Heiss’s indelible new novel is at once a joyful love story, a celebration of language, and an invitation to trace the old wounds of our history.'

1 Car Crash by Lech Blaine Review – A Bruisingly Insightful Memoir of Two Wreckages Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 9 April 2021;

— Review of Car Crash : A Memoir Lech Blaine , 2021 single work autobiography

'A tragic accident and a lifetime of trauma fuel this candid, thoughtful debut and examination of our tired ideas about manhood.'

1 The Speechwriter by Martin McKenzie-Murray Review – Larrikin Maximalism and Undergraduate Snicker Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 29 January 2021;

— Review of The Speechwriter Martin McKenzie-Murray , 2021 single work novel

'The first novel by this former speechwriter aims to provoke but its easy parodies of Australian politics are unlikely to elicit more than a shrug.;

1 Intricate Study of Grief Beejay Silcox , 2021 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 9 January 2021; (p. 14)

— Review of At the Edge of the Solid World Daniel Davis Wood , 2020 single work novel
1 Don’t Worry, Be Happy Beejay Silcox , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 28 November 2020; (p. 14)

— Review of Only Happiness Here : In Search of Elizabeth von Arnim Gabrielle Carey , 2020 single work biography

'Gabrielle Carey’s new book about forgotten Australian novelist Elizabeth von Arnim is a much-needed antidote to the seriousness of modernist fiction, writes Beejay Silcox'

1 Humanness : Past, Present and Future Beejay Silcox , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7 November 2020; (p. 16)

— Review of A Letter to Layla : Travels to Our Deep Past and Near Future Ramona Koval , 2020 single work prose

'On her deathbed, my grandmother wrote me a letter to be opened on my 18th birthday. When the time came, she was an echo of a memory; all that was left to miss was the idea of her. Yet there was an unexpected power in that long-waiting note with all its fervent, paper hopes. It was proof I had been precious to someone.' (Introduction)

1 The Living Sea of Waking Dreams by Richard Flanagan Review – A Wrenching Response to a Devastated World Beejay Silcox , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 16 October 2020; The Guardian Australia , 7 January 2021;

— Review of The Living Sea of Waking Dreams Richard Flanagan , 2020 single work novel

'In this magical realist tale, Flanagan’s extinction metaphor is not subtle – but the fiction of the Anthropocene can’t afford to be.'

1 Are You a Fox or a Wolf? Ferocious and Brutal Reckonings in The Bass Rock by Evie Wyld Beejay Silcox , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 17 April 2020;

— Review of The Bass Rock Evie Wyld , 2020 single work novel

'In the Firth of Forth in Scotland’s east, a hulking lump of volcanic rock rises steeply from the water, an “igneous intrusion”. Known as Bass Rock, it’s the kind of geological anomaly that inspires anthropomorphizing. It menaces; it waits. In Evie Wyld’s new novel, The Bass Rock, the guano-white monolith has watched on for centuries as women have come to harm, murdered under its imperious shadow. It feels as if some dark power is loose – a vicious bedevilment – but Wyld’s point is far more terrifying: the rock has simply borne witness to ordinary life.' (Introduction)

1 House Rules Beejay Silcox , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 6 March 2020; (p. 9)

— Review of Amnesty Aravind Adiga , 2020 novel
'SYDNEY IS CHOKING in Aravind Adiga's Amnesty, the sky "darkened by a film of windborne woodsmoke" that has coiled its way down from a bushfire in the Blue Mountains. The smoke is a grey wraith, haunting the city, triggering fire alarms in shops and houses as it sweeps across the harbour. It is a quiet background detail in Adiga's fourth novel. But as Australia burns, it feels consequential: not prescience so much as a kind of monstrous inevitability. With Amnesty, Adiga captures the breathless grief of stepping into a future that has already been written. It is equal parts elegy and indictment.' (Introduction)
1 In Plain Sight Beejay Silcox , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 10 August 2019; (p. 18)

— Review of Fake Stephanie Wood , 2019 single work autobiography

'In the #MeToo movement’s early, giant-felling months, when every day seemed to yield a new scandal, with women across the globe uniting in anguish and fury, David Leser was shaken by his own obliviousness. “I thought I was awake to this rampaging male aggression,” he wrote at the time, “but the truth is I had absolutely no idea what women faced.” In the final days of an erratic 15-month relationship, Stephanie Wood could no longer ignore what some deep, limbic part of her brain had long suspected: her boyfriend was a conman, a pathological fantasist.' (Introduction)

1 Fragile Friendships at Mercy of Grief Beejay Silcox , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 19 October 2019; (p. 23)

— Review of The Weekend Charlotte Wood , 2019 single work novel

Take your seats. There is a play, a drama of contained human collision, lurking under the surface of Charlotte Wood’s new novel, The Weekend.' (Introduction)

1 Gun Beejay Silcox , 2019 single work short story
— Appears in: Griffith Review , August no. 65 2019;
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