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Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Is Poetry Translatable? — Translating Open Window : Contemporary Australian Poetry—A Chinese-English Bilingual Anthology
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This paper attempts to clarify the issue of the translatability of poetry. However, the question whether poetry is translatable is a paradox because while quite a few renowned poet-translators like Dryden and Paz tend to deny the translation of poetry, poetry has been translated from ancient to present. The key point of the issue is not whether poetry is translatable, but what gets lost in the translation of poetry. Dryden sees the translator as servile, yet Bassnett emphasizes the “creative” spirit in translation, and points out “gain” in the translation against the persistent tendency to overemphasize on “loss” in translation in discussions of translation. This paper hence focuses on the key issue of “loss and gain” in the translation of poetry. As it proceeds to reveal the loss of sound qualities of the original in transferring a SL text to a TL text, it also displays some significant gains in the translation. All this is demonstrated and justified with concrete cases in my translation of an anthology of contemporary Australian poetry.'

Source: Abstract.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon 澳大利亚文化研究 Australian Cultural Studies vol. 1 no. 2 June 2016 9697633 2016 periodical issue 2016 pg. 58-71
Last amended 11 Jul 2016 12:28:10
58-71 Is Poetry Translatable? — Translating Open Window : Contemporary Australian Poetry—A Chinese-English Bilingual Anthologysmall AustLit logo 澳大利亚文化研究
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