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image of person or book cover 7835789718696731105.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
y separately published work icon One Photo single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 One Photo
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

From Ross Watkins, the illustrator of The Boy Who Grew Into a Tree, and Liz Anelli, comes this moving picture book about family, the failings of memory and the strength of love. Told in stunning prose, with poignant artwork, this book is a celebration of what we hold dearest.

Affiliation Notes

  • Writing Disability in Australia

    Type of disability Alzheimer's disease.
    Type of character Primary.
    Point of view First person (not the character with Alzheimer's).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Viking , 2016 .
      image of person or book cover 7835789718696731105.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 32p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Published 29 August 2016
      ISBN: 9780670077977
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Puffin , 2018 .
      Extent: 1 v.p.
      Edition info: Paperback Ed.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 9780143783022 (pbk)
Alternative title: 张照片
Transliterated title: Yi zhang zhao pian
Language: Chinese

Works about this Work

Out of Sight : The Censoring of Family Diversity in Picture Books Sarah Mokrzycki , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 57 2019;
'Family diversity has long been censored, silenced, and ignored in Australian picture books. Despite its long running representation in books for older readers, the concept of exploring family diversity at picture book level remains nothing short of radical. Of the little available, much comes in the form of issue-driven books and from specialist presses overseas, presenting a distinct gap in Australian children’s literature. The contentious history of diversity in children’s books creates added issues in the struggle for representation, and diverse stories (and diverse authors) face ongoing challenges. Furthermore, public outrage at the ‘shunning’ of nuclear families, as well as society’s distorted understanding of what constitutes diversity, present further complications in the advocating for family-diverse stories. This essay will examine what it means to be a family, the issues surrounding family diversity in picture books, and why such books deserve to be championed.'

 (Publication abstract)

Writing the Half of It : a Challenge Unique to Picture Book Authorship Ross Watkins , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Writing , vol. 16 no. 1 2019; (p. 3-15)

'The picture book is a complex narrative form which makes use of not only literary devices but also visual devices, taking into account the content of the illustrations themselves as well as the way design principles lever and help deliver meaning for the reader. The story a picture book tells – as a form which goes beyond the script – is thereby dependent on more than one mode of discourse. For the writer – authoring what is essentially half the story at most – the nature of the form creates challenges which are unique to picture book authorship. I aim to contribute to the existing critical thinking on the picture book by: mapping the context of scholarly and practice-based discussion; outlining foundational concepts regarding the counterpointing use of visual and verbal modes; and introducing the use of anticipation, direction and accommodation as essential strategies which the picture book author must negotiate. I demonstrate these practices in relation to how other picture book authors have articulated their processes, as well as using my own experience as the author of One Photo (Watkins, Ross, and Liz Anelli. 2016. One Photo. Melbourne: Penguin Random House) as a case study.'  (Publication abstract)

Eight Australian Picture Books That Celebrate Family Diversity Sarah Mokrzycki , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 10 January 2019; ABC News [Online] , January 2019;

'The official label used by the Australian government to define a traditional family (a two parent family with biological or adopted children only) is “intact”: Not damaged or impaired in any way. Complete. Whole. Unbroken.' (Introduction)

Eight Australian Picture Books That Celebrate Family Diversity Sarah Mokrzycki , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 10 January 2019; ABC News [Online] , January 2019;

'The official label used by the Australian government to define a traditional family (a two parent family with biological or adopted children only) is “intact”: Not damaged or impaired in any way. Complete. Whole. Unbroken.' (Introduction)

Writing the Half of It : a Challenge Unique to Picture Book Authorship Ross Watkins , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Writing , vol. 16 no. 1 2019; (p. 3-15)

'The picture book is a complex narrative form which makes use of not only literary devices but also visual devices, taking into account the content of the illustrations themselves as well as the way design principles lever and help deliver meaning for the reader. The story a picture book tells – as a form which goes beyond the script – is thereby dependent on more than one mode of discourse. For the writer – authoring what is essentially half the story at most – the nature of the form creates challenges which are unique to picture book authorship. I aim to contribute to the existing critical thinking on the picture book by: mapping the context of scholarly and practice-based discussion; outlining foundational concepts regarding the counterpointing use of visual and verbal modes; and introducing the use of anticipation, direction and accommodation as essential strategies which the picture book author must negotiate. I demonstrate these practices in relation to how other picture book authors have articulated their processes, as well as using my own experience as the author of One Photo (Watkins, Ross, and Liz Anelli. 2016. One Photo. Melbourne: Penguin Random House) as a case study.'  (Publication abstract)

Out of Sight : The Censoring of Family Diversity in Picture Books Sarah Mokrzycki , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 57 2019;
'Family diversity has long been censored, silenced, and ignored in Australian picture books. Despite its long running representation in books for older readers, the concept of exploring family diversity at picture book level remains nothing short of radical. Of the little available, much comes in the form of issue-driven books and from specialist presses overseas, presenting a distinct gap in Australian children’s literature. The contentious history of diversity in children’s books creates added issues in the struggle for representation, and diverse stories (and diverse authors) face ongoing challenges. Furthermore, public outrage at the ‘shunning’ of nuclear families, as well as society’s distorted understanding of what constitutes diversity, present further complications in the advocating for family-diverse stories. This essay will examine what it means to be a family, the issues surrounding family diversity in picture books, and why such books deserve to be championed.'

 (Publication abstract)

Last amended 24 Apr 2019 16:28:18
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