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Issue Details: First known date: 2015... 2015 Madame Mallalieu - An Inspiring Musician and Her Legacy for Queensland
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Documents and celebrates the achievements of one remarkable person and many of those in her circle. Henrietta ‘Madame’ Mallalieu née Percival, later Mrs Willmore is one of those figures who casts a long shadow, both during their lifetime and afterwards. In very recent times the only known photographic image of Henrietta seated at a musical instrument has been found. Even this does not do justice or fully represent this woman who gave countless performances of complex, brilliant and expressive repertoire over a public career lasting more than 60 years. The concept of heritage preservation is not new, but the ways in which the achievements of a person or organisation can be preserved and honoured are ever changing. It is hoped this volume will serve to extend the appreciation of Henrietta and the ways her influence and legacy have touched so many people. Her contribution to the formation of Brisbane’s cultural identity as a modern city has also been documented as completely as possible. In the absence of recordings, the best insights one can gain about a musician’s persona and skills are to be found in the scores of the works they performed, and to a certain extent within the commentary documented by well-informed peers. In the case of Henrietta, there exists a huge amount of press coverage of her performances, all of which is uniformly laudatory. She did not shy away from the most technically demanding repertoire as an organist and pianist. She also appeared to delight in the challenges provided both by virtuoso showpieces and the more profound masterworks. As she demonstrated repeatedly through her careful programming and preparation of printed background notes on the repertoire performed, Henrietta was also greatly concerned with audience development.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: This book is dedicated to Evelyn Kruger, and also Fay and Peter Johnstone, who share my passion for its subject and have been of great assistance in bringing the project to fruition.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Brisbane, Queensland,: Copyright Publishing , 2015 .
      image of person or book cover 4443621301259927021.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 302p.
      Description: still images
      ISBN: 9781921452253

Works about this Work

Peter Roennfeldt : Madame Mallalieu: An Inspiring Musician and Her Legacy for Queensland Kay Ferres , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Queensland Review , June vol. 23 no. 1 2016; (p. 103-105)

'Peter Roennfeldt’s study of the musician Henrietta Willmore might have been called The Fortunes of Henrietta Percival because, like Henry Handel Richardson’s trilogy, The Fortunes of Richard Mahony, it is a migrant story. Henrietta Percival came to Brisbane in 1864 as the wife of Alfred Mallalieu and, as their family grew, Henrietta established herself as a teacher and the ‘most accomplished female pianist and organist to have resided in colonial Brisbane’ (2015: vi). While the physician Mahony initially prospers in Australia, but ultimately succumbs to madness, Henrietta (who reinvents herself as Madame Mallalieu) is more resilient. She overcomes personal sorrow following the death of her daughter, survives the disappearance of two husbands and leaves an important cultural legacy.' (Introduction)

Peter Roennfeldt : Madame Mallalieu: An Inspiring Musician and Her Legacy for Queensland Kay Ferres , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Queensland Review , June vol. 23 no. 1 2016; (p. 103-105)

'Peter Roennfeldt’s study of the musician Henrietta Willmore might have been called The Fortunes of Henrietta Percival because, like Henry Handel Richardson’s trilogy, The Fortunes of Richard Mahony, it is a migrant story. Henrietta Percival came to Brisbane in 1864 as the wife of Alfred Mallalieu and, as their family grew, Henrietta established herself as a teacher and the ‘most accomplished female pianist and organist to have resided in colonial Brisbane’ (2015: vi). While the physician Mahony initially prospers in Australia, but ultimately succumbs to madness, Henrietta (who reinvents herself as Madame Mallalieu) is more resilient. She overcomes personal sorrow following the death of her daughter, survives the disappearance of two husbands and leaves an important cultural legacy.' (Introduction)

Last amended 23 Feb 2016 13:45:43
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