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y separately published work icon Wild Dog Dreaming : Love and Extinction multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 Wild Dog Dreaming : Love and Extinction
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'We are living in the midst of the Earth’s sixth great extinction event, the first one caused by a single species: our own. In Wild Dog Dreaming, Deborah Bird Rose explores what constitutes an ethical relationship with nonhuman others in this era of loss. She asks, Who are we, as a species? How do we fit into the Earth’s systems? Amidst so much change, how do we find our way into new stories to guide us? Rose explores these questions in the form of a dialogue between science and the humanities. Drawing on her conversations with Aboriginal people, for whom questions of extinction are up-close and very personal, Rose develops a mode of exposition that is dialogical, philosophical, and open-ended.

'An inspiration for Rose—and a touchstone throughout her book—is the endangered dingo of Australia. The dingo is not the first animal to face extinction, but its story is particularly disturbing because the threat to its future is being actively engineered by humans. The brazenness with which the dingo is being wiped out sheds valuable, and chilling, light on the likely fate of countless other animal and plant species.

'"People save what they love," observed Michael Soulé, the great conservation biologist. We must ask whether we, as humans, are capable of loving—and therefore capable of caring for—the animals and plants that are disappearing in a cascade of extinctions. Wild Dog Dreaming engages this question, and the result is a bold account of the entangled ethics of love, contingency, and desire.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Charlottesville, Virginia,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      University Press of Virginia ,
      2011 .
      image of person or book cover 5004238023926337510.jpeg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: ix, 168 pp.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Published April 2011
      ISBN: 9780813930916, 9780813931074, 9780813933597

Works about this Work

Extinction : Stories of Unravelling and Reworlding Matthew Nikolai Chrulew , Rick de Vos , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , September vol. 25 no. 1 2019; (p. 23-28)

'We live in a time of almost unfathomable loss, and we are called to respond. 

'Extinction challenges our thinking and writing. Such overwhelming disappearance of ways of being, experiencing and making meaning in the world disrupts familiar categories and demands new modes of response. It requires that we trace multiple forms of both countable and intangible loss, the unravelling of social and ecological communities as a result of colonialism and capture, development and defaunation and other destructive processes. It brings forth new modes of commemoration and mourning, and new practices of archiving and survival. It calls for action in the absence of hope, and for the recognition and nourishment of new generativities: new modes of assemblage and attachment, resurgence and reworlding, commoning, composting and caring for country .' (Publication abstract)

Love and Vision : The Story of Kathleen McArthur's Care for Wallum Country Anne Collett , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: PAN , no. 12 2016;
'In Wild Dog Dreaming, published in 2011, Deborah Bird Rose writes about 'Anthropogenic extinction' as 'a fact of death that is growing exponentially.' She notes that 'we are entering an era of loss of life unprecedented in human history' and states that '[t]he question, of course, is: if we humans are the cause, can we change ourselves enough to change our impacts?' (2) Rose moves on to quote Michael Soule's observation that '[p]eople save what they love', and asks with him, '[a]re humans capable of loving, and therefore of caring for, the animals and plants that are currently losing their lives in a growing cascade of extinctions?' She follows this question up with another, more imperative one, '[h]ow [are we] to invigorate love and action in ways that are generous, knowledgeable, and life-affirming?' (2) In interview three years later, Rose reiterates this view, urging her audience to take this moment, this challenge of the Anthropocene, 'to enhance our capacity for love, for care, for keeping faith with earth, keeping faith with life.'' (Publication abstract)
Review : Wild Dog Dreaming : Love and Extinction Rebecca Lucas , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: PAN , no. 8 2011; (p. 69-70)

— Review of Wild Dog Dreaming : Love and Extinction Deborah Bird Rose , 2011 multi chapter work criticism
Review : Wild Dog Dreaming : Love and Extinction Rebecca Lucas , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: PAN , no. 8 2011; (p. 69-70)

— Review of Wild Dog Dreaming : Love and Extinction Deborah Bird Rose , 2011 multi chapter work criticism
Love and Vision : The Story of Kathleen McArthur's Care for Wallum Country Anne Collett , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: PAN , no. 12 2016;
'In Wild Dog Dreaming, published in 2011, Deborah Bird Rose writes about 'Anthropogenic extinction' as 'a fact of death that is growing exponentially.' She notes that 'we are entering an era of loss of life unprecedented in human history' and states that '[t]he question, of course, is: if we humans are the cause, can we change ourselves enough to change our impacts?' (2) Rose moves on to quote Michael Soule's observation that '[p]eople save what they love', and asks with him, '[a]re humans capable of loving, and therefore of caring for, the animals and plants that are currently losing their lives in a growing cascade of extinctions?' She follows this question up with another, more imperative one, '[h]ow [are we] to invigorate love and action in ways that are generous, knowledgeable, and life-affirming?' (2) In interview three years later, Rose reiterates this view, urging her audience to take this moment, this challenge of the Anthropocene, 'to enhance our capacity for love, for care, for keeping faith with earth, keeping faith with life.'' (Publication abstract)
Extinction : Stories of Unravelling and Reworlding Matthew Nikolai Chrulew , Rick de Vos , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , September vol. 25 no. 1 2019; (p. 23-28)

'We live in a time of almost unfathomable loss, and we are called to respond. 

'Extinction challenges our thinking and writing. Such overwhelming disappearance of ways of being, experiencing and making meaning in the world disrupts familiar categories and demands new modes of response. It requires that we trace multiple forms of both countable and intangible loss, the unravelling of social and ecological communities as a result of colonialism and capture, development and defaunation and other destructive processes. It brings forth new modes of commemoration and mourning, and new practices of archiving and survival. It calls for action in the absence of hope, and for the recognition and nourishment of new generativities: new modes of assemblage and attachment, resurgence and reworlding, commoning, composting and caring for country .' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 26 May 2022 09:47:52
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