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Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Australia Day single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Australia Day
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'As a sweltering Australia Day dawns over Brisbane, three seemingly unconnected figures – a farmer (Bryan Brown), an Indigenous policewoman (Shari Sebbens) and an illegal Chinese immigrant (Jenny Wu) – are thrown together by chance and misfortune. As their stories arc and connect, they'll find themselves drawn into a web of racism, violence and simmering resentment that will leave none of them unscathed, and challenge everything they thought they knew about the country they call home.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

[Review] Australia Day D. M. Bradley , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , October vol. 452 no. 2017; (p. 28)

— Review of Australia Day Stephen M. Irwin 2016 single work film/TV

'Australia Day is a gruelling journey through the streets of Brisbane and subterranean national prejudices, but it does have a lot of heart and features some excellent performances.Director Kriv Stenders handled this sometimes scorching ensemble drama amid a flurry of other projects (the Red Dog sequel, his Go-Betweens doco, the Wake In Fright miniseries), and it certainly paints an unflattering but awfully real view of contemporary Australia, suggesting that perhaps he’s doing penance for those oh-so-nice Red Dogs.' (Introduction)

Bryan Brown : The Man on the Land in Australia Day Travis Johnson , 2017 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 25 September 2017;
Australia Day Review – Kriv Stenders Bites off More Than He Can Chew in Unfocused New Film Luke Buckmaster , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 13 June 2017;
'The Red Dog director Kriv Stenders’ new film is the sort of project you can imagine a public broadcaster happily investing in: a button-pushing multicultural drama set on Australia Day, following three groups of people from varying backgrounds. Revolving around the stories of troubled teenagers, Stenders substitutes booze, barbecues and the Hottest 100 for drug addiction, racially motivated violence and the trafficking of sex workers.' (Introduction)
Film News : Kriv Stenders Shoots Livewire Drama about What Australia Day Means Garry Maddox , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane Times , 7 September 2016;
'With a heartwarming new Red Dog film heading for cinemas at Christmas, Kriv Stenders is shooting a provocative new film that takes place over 12 hours on Australia Day. ...'
[Review] Australia Day D. M. Bradley , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , October vol. 452 no. 2017; (p. 28)

— Review of Australia Day Stephen M. Irwin 2016 single work film/TV

'Australia Day is a gruelling journey through the streets of Brisbane and subterranean national prejudices, but it does have a lot of heart and features some excellent performances.Director Kriv Stenders handled this sometimes scorching ensemble drama amid a flurry of other projects (the Red Dog sequel, his Go-Betweens doco, the Wake In Fright miniseries), and it certainly paints an unflattering but awfully real view of contemporary Australia, suggesting that perhaps he’s doing penance for those oh-so-nice Red Dogs.' (Introduction)

Film News : Kriv Stenders Shoots Livewire Drama about What Australia Day Means Garry Maddox , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane Times , 7 September 2016;
'With a heartwarming new Red Dog film heading for cinemas at Christmas, Kriv Stenders is shooting a provocative new film that takes place over 12 hours on Australia Day. ...'
Australia Day Review – Kriv Stenders Bites off More Than He Can Chew in Unfocused New Film Luke Buckmaster , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 13 June 2017;
'The Red Dog director Kriv Stenders’ new film is the sort of project you can imagine a public broadcaster happily investing in: a button-pushing multicultural drama set on Australia Day, following three groups of people from varying backgrounds. Revolving around the stories of troubled teenagers, Stenders substitutes booze, barbecues and the Hottest 100 for drug addiction, racially motivated violence and the trafficking of sex workers.' (Introduction)
Bryan Brown : The Man on the Land in Australia Day Travis Johnson , 2017 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 25 September 2017;
Last amended 30 Oct 2017 10:36:38
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