7166730125062166150.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Skin Deep looks at the preoccupations of European-Australians in their encounters with Aboriginal women and the tropes, types and perceptions that seeped into everyday settler-colonial thinking. Early erroneous and uninformed accounts of Aboriginal women and culture were repeated throughout various print forms and imagery, both in Australia in Europe, with names, dates and locations erased so that individual women came to be an anonymised as 'gins' and 'lubras'. Liz Conor identifies and traces the various tropes used to typecast Aboriginal women, contributing to their lasting hold on the colonial imagination even after conflicting records emerged.'

'The colonial archive itself, consisting largely of accounts by white men, is critiqued. Construction of Aboriginal women's gender and sexuality was a form of colonial control, and Conor shows how the industrialisation of print was critical to this control, emerging as it did alongside colonial expansion. For nearly all settlers, typecasting Aboriginal women through name-calling and repetition of tropes sufficed to evoke an understanding that was surface-based and half-knowing: only skin deep.' (Source: Publisher's website)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Language: English
    • Crawley, Inner Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: UWA Publishing , 2016 .
      7166730125062166150.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 310p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliography and index
      ISBN: 9781742588070

Works about this Work

[Review Essay] Skin Deep: Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Fiona Paisley , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , vol. 48 no. 1 2017; (p. 135-136)

'In this important and challenging book, Liz Conor analyses in compelling fashion a range of settler impressions of Aboriginal women circulating in vernacular settler colonial print culture. Deeply aware that these disturbing images have been powerfully destructive historically and continue to cause hurt, Conor insists nonetheless that we must look at them more closely if we are to better understand the violence, misogyny and disavowal embedded within settler colonialisms past and present. Conor seeks to unveil a way of ‘knowing’ that may be skin deep but has been influential in shaping settler understandings of racial difference. Everyday images intersected in complex ways with the truth claims of expert or eyewitness accounts (for example, in the records of early explorers) and Conor follows their multivalences and circulations via the coincidence between industrialised print culture and colonialism itself. Her insightful interrogations illustrate how diverse sources often ‘strewn across time and place’ came to create ‘everyday cultural meaning’ (67).' (Introduction)

[Review Essay] Liz Conor, Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Evelyn Araluen , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 76 no. 3 2017; (p. 228-231)
[Review Essay] Skin Deep: Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women. Kristyn Harman , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , March vol. 41 no. 1 2017; (p. 131-132)
Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women, by Liz Conor Mitchell Rolls , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 2 2016;
'Conor’s Skin Deep offers to critique the textual descriptions and imagery of Aboriginal women found in the colonial archives, and in particular those descriptions and images that were circulated widely through the increasingly industrialised print media. Conor states that the central argument of her book is that ‘colonial racism and gender relations hinge in particular ways and depended on the facility of print to reiterate and thereby entrench meaning as truth’ (38). For Conor the ‘reiteration of those unverified tropes’ (37) that elsewhere she describes as white ‘lies’ (27, 363, 368) mostly produced by ‘white men’ (27), ‘rationalise the colonial project’ (37). Conor seeks to highlight the appalling racism and misogyny evident in many of the representations she scrutinises, and in doing so she hopes to intervene in and disrupt their enduring legacy.' (Introduction)
Books : Skin Deep Catherine Kevin , Monique Mulholland , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , December - January no. 145 2016-2017; (p. 50-51)

— Review of Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Liz Conor 2016 multi chapter work criticism
Illicit Love by Ann McGrath and Skin Deep by Liz Conor: behind Black and White Cliches Lynette Russell , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane Times , 30 September 2016;

— Review of Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Liz Conor 2016 multi chapter work criticism
'... Complementary to McGrath's work and almost reading as a counter to it, Liz Conor's Skin Deep examines the preoccupations of European-Australians in their encounters with Aboriginal women. While negative images of Aboriginal people generally were common in the 19th century, Aboriginal women in particular were subjected to quite hideous representations. ...'
[Review] Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Barbara Dawson , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , vol. 40 no. 2016; (p. 349-351)

— Review of Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Liz Conor 2016 multi chapter work criticism
Books : Skin Deep Catherine Kevin , Monique Mulholland , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , December - January no. 145 2016-2017; (p. 50-51)

— Review of Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Liz Conor 2016 multi chapter work criticism
Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women, by Liz Conor Mitchell Rolls , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 2 2016;
'Conor’s Skin Deep offers to critique the textual descriptions and imagery of Aboriginal women found in the colonial archives, and in particular those descriptions and images that were circulated widely through the increasingly industrialised print media. Conor states that the central argument of her book is that ‘colonial racism and gender relations hinge in particular ways and depended on the facility of print to reiterate and thereby entrench meaning as truth’ (38). For Conor the ‘reiteration of those unverified tropes’ (37) that elsewhere she describes as white ‘lies’ (27, 363, 368) mostly produced by ‘white men’ (27), ‘rationalise the colonial project’ (37). Conor seeks to highlight the appalling racism and misogyny evident in many of the representations she scrutinises, and in doing so she hopes to intervene in and disrupt their enduring legacy.' (Introduction)
[Review Essay] Skin Deep: Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women. Kristyn Harman , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , March vol. 41 no. 1 2017; (p. 131-132)
[Review Essay] Liz Conor, Skin Deep : Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Evelyn Araluen , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 76 no. 3 2017; (p. 228-231)
[Review Essay] Skin Deep: Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women Fiona Paisley , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , vol. 48 no. 1 2017; (p. 135-136)

'In this important and challenging book, Liz Conor analyses in compelling fashion a range of settler impressions of Aboriginal women circulating in vernacular settler colonial print culture. Deeply aware that these disturbing images have been powerfully destructive historically and continue to cause hurt, Conor insists nonetheless that we must look at them more closely if we are to better understand the violence, misogyny and disavowal embedded within settler colonialisms past and present. Conor seeks to unveil a way of ‘knowing’ that may be skin deep but has been influential in shaping settler understandings of racial difference. Everyday images intersected in complex ways with the truth claims of expert or eyewitness accounts (for example, in the records of early explorers) and Conor follows their multivalences and circulations via the coincidence between industrialised print culture and colonialism itself. Her insightful interrogations illustrate how diverse sources often ‘strewn across time and place’ came to create ‘everyday cultural meaning’ (67).' (Introduction)

Last amended 7 Aug 2017 11:39:23
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