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Cover image courtesy of publisher.
y Portable Curiosities selected work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Portable Curiosities
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A biting collection of stories from a bold new voice. A young girl sees ghosts from her third eye, located where her belly button should be. A corporate lawyer feels increasingly disconnected from his job in a soulless 1200-storey skyscraper. And a one-dimensional yellow man steps out from a cinema screen in the hope of leading a three-dimensional life, but everyone around him is fixated only on the color of his skin. Welcome to Portable Curiosities. In these dark and often fantastical stories, Julie Koh combines absurd humour with searing critiques on modern society, proving herself to be one of Australia's most original and daring young writers.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: For my parents and sister, patrons of this dark art.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Stacey Trick Reviews Portable Curiosities by Julie Koh Stacey Trick , single work essay
— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
'The short story form, historically, has been regarded as a literary art form in its own right that often creatively explores the zeitgeist of a particular time and the psyche of the human condition. Throughout history, celebrated writers have often influenced a fixed supposition in their reader’s imaginations. When we think of Ernest Hemingway, the trials and tribulations of being a poor writer and expatriate during war times particularly in Paris comes to the forefront of our minds. To think of Arthur Conan Doyle evokes, at once, impressions of Sherlock Holmes solving mysteries in the bustling streets of London during the Victorian and Edwardian periods, between about 1880 to 1914. And certainly, when Edgar Allan Poe comes to mind, impressions of macabre and mystery influenced by the darkest corners of the human psyche are often explored in the most extreme and grisly circumstances.' (Introduction)
Julie Koh Portable Curiosities. Reviewed by Ashley Kalagian Blunt Ashley Kalagian Blunt , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , August 2017;

'Portable Curiosities portrays a world of comic misery and brightly coloured heartache.'

Stacey Trick Reviews Portable Curiosities by Julie Koh Stacey Trick , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Mascara , April no. 20 2017;

— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
'The short story form, historically, has been regarded as a literary art form in its own right that often creatively explores the zeitgeist of a particular time and the psyche of the human condition. Throughout history, celebrated writers have often influenced a fixed supposition in their reader’s imaginations. When we think of Ernest Hemingway, the trials and tribulations of being a poor writer and expatriate during war times particularly in Paris comes to the forefront of our minds. To think of Arthur Conan Doyle evokes, at once, impressions of Sherlock Holmes solving mysteries in the bustling streets of London during the Victorian and Edwardian periods, between about 1880 to 1914. And certainly, when Edgar Allan Poe comes to mind, impressions of macabre and mystery influenced by the darkest corners of the human psyche are often explored in the most extreme and grisly circumstances.' (Introduction)
Review: 'Portable Curiosities' by Julie Koh Cassandra Atherton , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 383 2016; (p. 44)

— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
Review : Portable Curiosities Heather Lunney , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Good Reading , July 2016; (p. 34)

— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
Review : Portable Curiosities Heather Lunney , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Good Reading , July 2016; (p. 34)

— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
Review: 'Portable Curiosities' by Julie Koh Cassandra Atherton , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 383 2016; (p. 44)

— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
August in Fiction Michalia Arathimos , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , August 2016;

— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story ; Salt Creek Lucy Treloar 2015 single work novel ; Dodge Rose Jack Cox 2015 single work novel
The Bleeding Edge : New Short Fiction Sophia Barnes , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , October 2016;

— Review of After the Carnage Tara June Winch 2016 selected work short story ; Peripheral Vision Paddy O'Reilly 2015 selected work short story ; Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
Stacey Trick Reviews Portable Curiosities by Julie Koh Stacey Trick , single work essay
— Review of Portable Curiosities Julie Koh 2016 selected work short story
'The short story form, historically, has been regarded as a literary art form in its own right that often creatively explores the zeitgeist of a particular time and the psyche of the human condition. Throughout history, celebrated writers have often influenced a fixed supposition in their reader’s imaginations. When we think of Ernest Hemingway, the trials and tribulations of being a poor writer and expatriate during war times particularly in Paris comes to the forefront of our minds. To think of Arthur Conan Doyle evokes, at once, impressions of Sherlock Holmes solving mysteries in the bustling streets of London during the Victorian and Edwardian periods, between about 1880 to 1914. And certainly, when Edgar Allan Poe comes to mind, impressions of macabre and mystery influenced by the darkest corners of the human psyche are often explored in the most extreme and grisly circumstances.' (Introduction)
A Feast of Bite-Sized Gems Elaine Fry , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 19 October 2016; (p. 18)
Julie Koh Portable Curiosities. Reviewed by Ashley Kalagian Blunt Ashley Kalagian Blunt , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , August 2017;

'Portable Curiosities portrays a world of comic misery and brightly coloured heartache.'

Last amended 26 Jul 2017 15:45:04
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