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y separately published work icon Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A vital Aboriginal perspective on colonial storytelling

'Indigenous lawyer and writer Larissa Behrendt has long been fascinated by the story of Eliza Fraser, who was purportedly captured by the local Butchulla people after she was shipwrecked on their island in 1836. In this deeply personal book, Behrendt uses Eliza’s tale as a starting point to interrogate how Aboriginal people – and indigenous people of other countries – have been portrayed in their colonizers’ stories. Citing works as diverse as Robinson Crusoe and Coonardoo, she explores the tropes in these accounts, such as the supposed promiscuity of Aboriginal women, the Europeans’ fixation on cannibalism, and the myth of the noble savage. Ultimately, Behrendt shows how these stories not only reflect the values of their storytellers but also reinforce those values – which in Australia led to the dispossession of Aboriginal people and the laws enforced against them. ' (Publication summary)

Exhibitions

14142968
12544724

Notes

  • Dedication: for Michael Lavarch
  • Epigraph:

    If not for other, there is no self.

    If not for self, nothing is apprehended.

    –Chuang-tzu

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

[Review Essay] Finding Eliza: Power and Colonial Storytelling Penny Russell , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , vol. 48 no. 2 2017; (p. 302-303)

'Little of Eliza Fraser’s life was spent in Australia, but her name has become part of its colonised landscape. So, too, has her story. Shipwrecked off the coast of Australia in 1836, she lived for several weeks with local Aboriginal people, the Butchulla, traditional custodians and owners of the island that now bears her name. Her husband perished but Eliza survived, enduring – by her own account – abuse and drudgery before being rescued and restored to civilised society. Sensational accounts of her ordeal ensured her story a lasting place in colonial mythology, reinforced and reinvented in the twentieth century when her ‘captivity’ was made the theme of paintings by Sidney Nolan, a novel by Patrick White, and a memorable 1970s film.'  (Introduction)

April in Nonfiction Sarah Burnside , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , April 2016;

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism ; The Best Australian Essays 2015 2015 anthology essay
[Review] Finding Eliza Robyn Douglass , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 27 February 2016; (p. 40)

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism
Challenging the Received Picture Babette Smith , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 19-20 March 2016; (p. 19)

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism
The Pulling Power of Prejudice Simon Caterson , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 March 2016; (p. 26) The Saturday Age , 12-13 March 2016; (p. 26)

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism
Behrendt's New Book Sheds Light on Story 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 10 February no. 619 2016; (p. 39)

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism
The Pulling Power of Prejudice Simon Caterson , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12-13 March 2016; (p. 26) The Saturday Age , 12-13 March 2016; (p. 26)

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism
Challenging the Received Picture Babette Smith , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 19-20 March 2016; (p. 19)

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism
[Review] Finding Eliza Robyn Douglass , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 27 February 2016; (p. 40)

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism
April in Nonfiction Sarah Burnside , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , April 2016;

— Review of Finding Eliza : Power and Colonial Storytelling Larissa Behrendt , 2016 multi chapter work criticism ; The Best Australian Essays 2015 2015 anthology essay
Larissa Behrendt Susan Chenery , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 30-31 January 2016; (p. 24) The Age , 30-31 January 2016; (p. 24)

'A colonial story of hardship and humiliation after a 19th-century shipwreck is unpicked to reveal the Indigenous perspective. '

Other Peoples’ Stories Jeanine Leane , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 225 2016; (p. 41)
'In the late 1960s, when I was about eight, I announced to my aunt that I wanted to be white. If I were white, I explained, I would see myself everywhere – on television, on posters, in magazines, in books.' (Introduction)
[Review Essay] Finding Eliza: Power and Colonial Storytelling Penny Russell , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , vol. 48 no. 2 2017; (p. 302-303)

'Little of Eliza Fraser’s life was spent in Australia, but her name has become part of its colonised landscape. So, too, has her story. Shipwrecked off the coast of Australia in 1836, she lived for several weeks with local Aboriginal people, the Butchulla, traditional custodians and owners of the island that now bears her name. Her husband perished but Eliza survived, enduring – by her own account – abuse and drudgery before being rescued and restored to civilised society. Sensational accounts of her ordeal ensured her story a lasting place in colonial mythology, reinforced and reinvented in the twentieth century when her ‘captivity’ was made the theme of paintings by Sidney Nolan, a novel by Patrick White, and a memorable 1970s film.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 20 Mar 2018 10:41:03
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