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y separately published work icon Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas series - author   novella  
Alternative title: Wisdom Tree
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A series of novellas by Nick Earls. On the first of every month from May to September 2016, Inkerman & Blunt released one novella at a time, then a Deluxe Christmas edition in October 2016.

Includes

1
y separately published work icon Cargo Gotham Nick Earls , Pittsburgh : Exciting Press , 2016 9701471 2015 single work novella

'Gotham tells of the encounter between music journalist, Jeff Foster and ‘boy pharaoh’, Nasti Boi. It reveals how hollow celebrities cast their spell.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

2
y separately published work icon Venice Nick Earls , Carlton South : Inkerman and Blunt , 2016 9174347 2016 single work novella
3
y separately published work icon Vancouver Nick Earls , Carlton South : Inkerman and Blunt , 2016 9174371 2016 single work novella

The story's narrator, Paul, remembers 'a giant who came to stay with his family when his father was trying to bring American football to Australia. The tall guy in question was a player called Knut Knudsen; as a small boy, our narrator sees him as the modern day equivalent of the Colossus of Rhodes. Knudsen has dreams of becoming of all things, a writer. And it turns out that when our narrator is all grown up, he himself has become a writer, and is on an author tour to a Canadian festival... As a side trip from his festival appearances, he reconnects with Knudsen, who has published several books and is now married and teaching creative writing at a university college' (Caroline Baum, Booktopia).

4
y separately published work icon Juneau Nick Earls , Carlton South : Inkerman and Blunt , 2016 9174314 2016 single work novella
5
y separately published work icon NoHo Nick Earls , Carlton South : Inkerman and Blunt , 2016 9174395 2016 single work novella

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2016

Works about this Work

Anxieties of Obsolescence and Transformation : Digital Technology in Contemporary Australian Literary Fiction Julian Novitz , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 57 2019;

'When addressing the rise of mass media, literary authors of the late twentieth century often expressed an ‘anxiety of obsolescence’ (Fitzpatrick 2006) in their work: an acute awareness of being potentially displaced. This often led them to adopt an attitude of defiance in the face of technological change.

'Many contemporary literary authors adopt a similar oppositional attitude towards the rise and encroachment of networked technology, but retreating to the increasingly peripheral territory of ‘pure’ print-based literature is no longer easy. Digital technology presents not only the possibility of displacement but also that of transformation, with its spread threatening to fundamentally alter the practice of reading and writing.

'Possibly in response to the radical upheavals faced by Australian literary culture due to the rise of electronic publishing since 2012, recent works by three established Australian authors – Amnesia by Peter Carey (2014), the Wisdom Tree novella sequence by Nick Earls (2016), and The Life to Come by Michelle de Kretser (2017) – examine the ways in which networked technologies challenge or complicate the role, identity and practice of the contemporary print-oriented writer. The telling connection is that they present the relationship between print-based writers and networked technology as being transformative rather than simply oppositional, demonstrating the emergence of complex and nuanced responses to the rise of networked technology in Australian literature.' (Publication abstract)

Digital Publishing and the Australian Novella : Considering the Impact of Nick Earls’ The Wisdom Tree Sequence Julian Novitz , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 51 2018;

'Though often contested and difficult to define, the novella has become more visible in Australian literature in recent years. This increased interest in the novella has often been connected to developments in digital technology and reading culture. Some commentators suggest that the increased distractibility and time poverty of contemporary audiences may make shorter literary works more appealing (Dale 2012), while others claim that the reduced costs of digital publishing may make novellas more commercially viable (Tan 2016). This paper will examine and assess these claims in the context of past and current debate around the status of the novella, using Nick Earls’ Wisdom Tree (2016) sequence of novellas as a case study so as to consider whether the current rise of digital publishing platforms has shifted the ways in which the form is approached and understood. This discussion has direct implications for fiction writers considering the advantages and affordances of the novella. Writers will need to assess both the possibilities presented by the resurgence of interest in the novella, its long-term sustainability, and future possible directions for the form in a digitally saturated culture.'  (Publication abstract)

[Essay Review] Wisdom Tree Bronwyn Mitchell , 2017 single work essay review
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , vol. 36 no. 1 2017; (p. 43-44)

'In Venice, the second of Nick Earls’ interconnected novellas, sculptor Natalie Landry explains her current project. Demonstrating with her hands the angles at which her family of figures relate to each other, she explores the difference in degrees between intimacy and indifference. ‘Aloof’ is the word she settles on: ‘“This one you're paying attention, avidly, to something close by.” She lifts her fingers so that they’re almost straight again. “Now it’s dead to you. It’s in the foreground but not a threat, not interesting. You’re all about the horizon, something out there”’ (Earls 2015: 36). This theme of family relationships—how we are angled towards or away from the people closest to us, what lies in the foreground of our lives and what is on the horizon—connects all of the stories in Wisdom Tree to create a compelling work that is more than the sum of its individual parts' (Introduction)

Wisdom Tree Review: Nick Earls' Brilliant Use of the Novella to Look at Families Peter Pierce , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane Times , 19 August 2016;

— Review of Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas Nick Earls , 2016 series - author novella
'Nick Earls' delicate and daring Wisdom Tree is a collection of five loosely linked novellas, each with a suggestive, but not straightforward place name. In Gotham, a musician turned journalist interviews the latest rap sensation Na$sti Boi, "nineteen and ascendant", but essentially "a lost boy". In a stunning shift, the story poignantly ends among children in Central Park. Next is Venice, which denotes a place of intense yearning for Natalie Landry (Australia's second most famous installation artist after Patricia Piccinini) as she vies to be the country's representative at the Biennale. ...'
A Sad Sweetness Links Striking Novellas Peter Pierce , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 August 2016; (p. 21) The Saturday Age , 20-21 August 2016; (p. 24)

— Review of Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas Nick Earls , 2016 series - author novella
A Sad Sweetness Links Striking Novellas Peter Pierce , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 August 2016; (p. 21) The Saturday Age , 20-21 August 2016; (p. 24)

— Review of Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas Nick Earls , 2016 series - author novella
Wisdom Tree Review: Nick Earls' Brilliant Use of the Novella to Look at Families Peter Pierce , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Brisbane Times , 19 August 2016;

— Review of Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas Nick Earls , 2016 series - author novella
'Nick Earls' delicate and daring Wisdom Tree is a collection of five loosely linked novellas, each with a suggestive, but not straightforward place name. In Gotham, a musician turned journalist interviews the latest rap sensation Na$sti Boi, "nineteen and ascendant", but essentially "a lost boy". In a stunning shift, the story poignantly ends among children in Central Park. Next is Venice, which denotes a place of intense yearning for Natalie Landry (Australia's second most famous installation artist after Patricia Piccinini) as she vies to be the country's representative at the Biennale. ...'
Review : Wisdom Tree : A Collection of 5 Novellas by Nick Earls Joanne Peulen , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Booklover Book Reviews 2016;

— Review of Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas Nick Earls , 2016 series - author novella
Going the Distance Anthony Lynch , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 384 2016; (p. 52)

— Review of Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas Nick Earls , 2016 series - author novella

In the final novella of Nick Earls's quintet The Wisdom Tree, a benign security guard, Wanda, misquotes Tolstoy: 'No family is perfect. But each family isn't perfect in its own way.' Crossing between continents, each of these intersecting novellas reveals characters who variously express love for the institution of family and opportunistically exploit it. Compromised ambition flourishes throughout. Narrators find themselves support acts to the aspirations of others. Success, with its brief euphorias, might or might not come, but compromise has its own rewards.' (Introduction)

All Thriller, No Filler Julian Novitz , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , November 2016;

— Review of Wisdom Tree : Five Novellas Nick Earls , 2016 series - author novella
Nick Earls on the Unlikely Rise of the Novella, Star of the Ebook Revolution Monica Tan , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 2 May 2016;
'... Earls is releasing ... novellas on the first of every month under the umbrella title Wisdom Tree, starting with Gotham released on Monday. Audiobook versions are being simultaneously released on Audible, narrated by Australian actors Rhys Muldoon, Flynn Curry, Gyton Grantley, Michael Dorman and William McInnes. ...'
Alexei Sayle and Comrades Smash Taboos at Melbourne Writers' Festival Jane Sullivan , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: Brisbane Times , 5 September 2016;
[Essay Review] Wisdom Tree Bronwyn Mitchell , 2017 single work essay review
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , vol. 36 no. 1 2017; (p. 43-44)

'In Venice, the second of Nick Earls’ interconnected novellas, sculptor Natalie Landry explains her current project. Demonstrating with her hands the angles at which her family of figures relate to each other, she explores the difference in degrees between intimacy and indifference. ‘Aloof’ is the word she settles on: ‘“This one you're paying attention, avidly, to something close by.” She lifts her fingers so that they’re almost straight again. “Now it’s dead to you. It’s in the foreground but not a threat, not interesting. You’re all about the horizon, something out there”’ (Earls 2015: 36). This theme of family relationships—how we are angled towards or away from the people closest to us, what lies in the foreground of our lives and what is on the horizon—connects all of the stories in Wisdom Tree to create a compelling work that is more than the sum of its individual parts' (Introduction)

Digital Publishing and the Australian Novella : Considering the Impact of Nick Earls’ The Wisdom Tree Sequence Julian Novitz , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 51 2018;

'Though often contested and difficult to define, the novella has become more visible in Australian literature in recent years. This increased interest in the novella has often been connected to developments in digital technology and reading culture. Some commentators suggest that the increased distractibility and time poverty of contemporary audiences may make shorter literary works more appealing (Dale 2012), while others claim that the reduced costs of digital publishing may make novellas more commercially viable (Tan 2016). This paper will examine and assess these claims in the context of past and current debate around the status of the novella, using Nick Earls’ Wisdom Tree (2016) sequence of novellas as a case study so as to consider whether the current rise of digital publishing platforms has shifted the ways in which the form is approached and understood. This discussion has direct implications for fiction writers considering the advantages and affordances of the novella. Writers will need to assess both the possibilities presented by the resurgence of interest in the novella, its long-term sustainability, and future possible directions for the form in a digitally saturated culture.'  (Publication abstract)

Anxieties of Obsolescence and Transformation : Digital Technology in Contemporary Australian Literary Fiction Julian Novitz , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , October no. 57 2019;

'When addressing the rise of mass media, literary authors of the late twentieth century often expressed an ‘anxiety of obsolescence’ (Fitzpatrick 2006) in their work: an acute awareness of being potentially displaced. This often led them to adopt an attitude of defiance in the face of technological change.

'Many contemporary literary authors adopt a similar oppositional attitude towards the rise and encroachment of networked technology, but retreating to the increasingly peripheral territory of ‘pure’ print-based literature is no longer easy. Digital technology presents not only the possibility of displacement but also that of transformation, with its spread threatening to fundamentally alter the practice of reading and writing.

'Possibly in response to the radical upheavals faced by Australian literary culture due to the rise of electronic publishing since 2012, recent works by three established Australian authors – Amnesia by Peter Carey (2014), the Wisdom Tree novella sequence by Nick Earls (2016), and The Life to Come by Michelle de Kretser (2017) – examine the ways in which networked technologies challenge or complicate the role, identity and practice of the contemporary print-oriented writer. The telling connection is that they present the relationship between print-based writers and networked technology as being transformative rather than simply oppositional, demonstrating the emergence of complex and nuanced responses to the rise of networked technology in Australian literature.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 19 Nov 2018 08:55:45
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