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y separately published work icon Lemons in the Chicken Wire selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 Lemons in the Chicken Wire
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Winner 2015 black&write! Indigenous Writing Fellowship – a partnership between the State Library of Queensland’s black&write! Indigenous Writing and Editing Project and Magabala Books.'

'From a remarkable new voice in Indigenous writing comes this highly original collection of poems bristling with stunning imagery and gritty textures. At times sensual, always potent, Lemons in the Chicken Wire delivers a collage of work that reflects rural identity through a rich medley of techniques and forms.'

'It is an audacious, lyrical and linguistically lemon flavoured poetry debut that possesses a rare edginess and seeks to challenge our imagination beyond the ordinary. Alison Whittaker demonstrates that borders, whether physical or imagined, are no match for our capacity for love.' (Source: Newsouth Books website)

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Notes

  • Author's note: To the lands, and those who grow from it.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2016 .
      image of person or book cover 2620276795842247340.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 80p.
      Note/s:
      • Published March 2016.
      ISBN: 9781925360103

Works about this Work

To Speak Clearly Takes Work, or a Gift (Probably Both) Carmen Leigh Keates , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Foam:e , March no. 14 2017;

'I became aware of Alison Whittaker’s first poetry collection, Lemons in the Chicken Wire, during the 2016 Queensland Poetry Festival. At the panel I attended, Whittaker wasn’t reading from her book but instead (like the other poets on the panel, Justin Clemens, Stuart Cooke and Natalie Harkin) she was presenting a poetic response to Dorothea Mackellar’s “My Country”.'  (Introduction)

Alison Whittaker : Lemons in the Chicken Wire Brianna Bullen , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Rabbit , no. 21 2017; (p. 128-133)

'Alison Whittaker's debut, the Black&Write! Indigenous Writing Fellowship winning Lemons in the Chicken Wire, is a triumph in wit, Subversive playfulness, and identity reclamation, creating a new praxis for indigenous, queer, feminist and rural poetics in forty-nine boundary-defying poems. Dedicated 'To the land, and those who grow from it,' the collection reads as a love-letter to the land, family, community, strong women, and the pain of growing up. Whittaker's experience as a Gomeroi woman, lesbian, academic, and as a family member in a rural town are poetically inextricable. Every deliberately chosen word and subversive tun reflects and honours this intersectionality.' (Introduction)

Transcending the Conventions Michelle Cahill , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 13-14 August 2016; (p. 22)

— Review of Comfort Food Ellen van Neerven , 2016 selected work poetry ; Lemons in the Chicken Wire Alison Whittaker , 2016 selected work poetry
May in Poetry Elena Gomez , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , May 2016;

— Review of Dirty Words Natalie Harkin , 2015 selected work poetry ; Lemons in the Chicken Wire Alison Whittaker , 2016 selected work poetry
Caitlin Maling Reviews Alison Whittaker Caitlin Maling , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 4 May no. 54.0 2016;

— Review of Lemons in the Chicken Wire Alison Whittaker , 2016 selected work poetry
Caitlin Maling Reviews Alison Whittaker Caitlin Maling , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 4 May no. 54.0 2016;

— Review of Lemons in the Chicken Wire Alison Whittaker , 2016 selected work poetry
May in Poetry Elena Gomez , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , May 2016;

— Review of Dirty Words Natalie Harkin , 2015 selected work poetry ; Lemons in the Chicken Wire Alison Whittaker , 2016 selected work poetry
Transcending the Conventions Michelle Cahill , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 13-14 August 2016; (p. 22)

— Review of Comfort Food Ellen van Neerven , 2016 selected work poetry ; Lemons in the Chicken Wire Alison Whittaker , 2016 selected work poetry
New Faces for Black&write! 2015 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 1 July no. 604 2015; (p. 66)
'Four Indigenous writers and editors have joined the State Library of Queensland's black&write! Indigenous Writing and Edition team...'
Alison Whittaker : Lemons in the Chicken Wire Brianna Bullen , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Rabbit , no. 21 2017; (p. 128-133)

'Alison Whittaker's debut, the Black&Write! Indigenous Writing Fellowship winning Lemons in the Chicken Wire, is a triumph in wit, Subversive playfulness, and identity reclamation, creating a new praxis for indigenous, queer, feminist and rural poetics in forty-nine boundary-defying poems. Dedicated 'To the land, and those who grow from it,' the collection reads as a love-letter to the land, family, community, strong women, and the pain of growing up. Whittaker's experience as a Gomeroi woman, lesbian, academic, and as a family member in a rural town are poetically inextricable. Every deliberately chosen word and subversive tun reflects and honours this intersectionality.' (Introduction)

To Speak Clearly Takes Work, or a Gift (Probably Both) Carmen Leigh Keates , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Foam:e , March no. 14 2017;

'I became aware of Alison Whittaker’s first poetry collection, Lemons in the Chicken Wire, during the 2016 Queensland Poetry Festival. At the panel I attended, Whittaker wasn’t reading from her book but instead (like the other poets on the panel, Justin Clemens, Stuart Cooke and Natalie Harkin) she was presenting a poetic response to Dorothea Mackellar’s “My Country”.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 7 Nov 2017 12:45:54
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