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Issue Details: First known date: 2015... 2015 Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This book rewrites the history of Australian literature as the rough beginnings of a new literacy. Farrell's investigations of the colonial, material page begins with Bennelong's letter of 1796, and continues through bushranger Ned Kelly's famous Jerilderie letter, Jong's Chinese-Australian phrase-chains, Harpur's proto prose poem, Dorothea Mackellar's coded diaries, Christopher Brennan-does-Mallarmé (and collage), and ends with Mary Fullerton's quotation game "Bromide." Here you will find songs, letters and visual poems by Indigenous farmers and stockmen, the unpunctuated journals of early settler women, drover tree-messages and carved clubs, and a meta-commentary on settlement from Moore River (the place escaped from in The Rabbit-Proof Fence). The book borrows the figure of the assemblage to suggest the active and revisable nature of Australian writing, arguing against the "settling" effects of its prior editors, anthologists and historians. It resists offering a new canon, but offers instead an unsettled space in which to rethink Australian writing.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Contents:

    – Introduction

    – The hunted writer

    – An Australian poetics of the plough

    – Unnecessary inventions

    – Open secrets

    – Boredom

    – Unsettling the field

    – Writing to order

    – Homelessness

    – Conclusion.

  • For Martin

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Palgrave Macmillan ,
      2015 .
      image of person or book cover 6048446612753676515.png
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 272p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 17 September 2015
      ISBN: 9781137485717

Works about this Work

Who's Afraid of Poetic Invention? Anthologising Australian Poetry in the Twenty-First Century A.J. Carruthers , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 17 no. 2 2018;

'There has been a rich history of anthologising Australian poetry this far into the twenty-first century. This article claims that contemporary poetics, with a renewed focus on the recoprocal relation between cultural and linguistic inquiry, can rediscover alternative ways of reading the history of Australian avant-garde, inventive and experimental work. Considering several key anthologies published after the turn of last century, the article provides readings of both the frameworks the anthology-makers provide and the poems themselves, claiming that mark, trace and lexical segmentivities can already be read as social. It then proposes a new possibility for an experimental anthology that might bring these facets into lived praxis: the chrestomathy.' (Publication abstract)

Country & Western Robert Wood , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 7 2017;

'That poetry is implicated with politics is incontrovertible.  As Theodore Adorno writes ‘art exists in the real world and has a function in it, and the two are connected by a large number of mediating links.’   Those mediating links however, the things that connect each to the other, are harder to grapple with. What does the daily life of a protest poet look like compared to a conservative one when both work in a modern university? What poetry does the politician read?' (Introduction)

Review : Writing Australian Unsettlement: Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Molly Murn , 2016 single work
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 8 no. 2 2016;

— Review of Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Michael Farrell , 2015 single work criticism
Matthew Hall Reviews Writing Australian Unsettlement Matthew Hall , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , April no. 53.1 2016;

— Review of Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Michael Farrell , 2015 single work criticism
How We Found Our Own Voice Peter Kenneally , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 February 2016; (p. 20)

— Review of Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Michael Farrell , 2015 single work criticism
How We Found Our Own Voice Peter Kenneally , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 February 2016; (p. 20)

— Review of Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Michael Farrell , 2015 single work criticism
Matthew Hall Reviews Writing Australian Unsettlement Matthew Hall , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , April no. 53.1 2016;

— Review of Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Michael Farrell , 2015 single work criticism
Review : Writing Australian Unsettlement: Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Molly Murn , 2016 single work
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 8 no. 2 2016;

— Review of Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 Michael Farrell , 2015 single work criticism
“Not Me Go to England No More” : Michael Farrell’s Writing Australian Unsettlement U.S. Dhuga , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 30 no. 1 2016; (p. 206-220)

'In this significant critical work, Michael Farrell offers up a dialectical method (not announced as such), which I daresay is not unworthy of such a one as Lionel Trilling. In chapter 1, "The Hunted Writer," Farrell provides a bracing reading of unsettlement through both The Jerilderie Letter by Ned Kelly—"the notorious bushranger" (I1)—and also Bennelong's "Letter to Lord Mr Philips, Lord Sidney's Steward." By pairing these particular texts—so historically fecund as regards the discursivity of settler-hunter (Kelly) vis-à-vis Indigenous travel (Bennelong)—in a poetics of unsettlement, Farrell maintains that "these two colonial writers were participants, as both protagonists and victims" (13). The integrity of Farrell's readings stands on their own merits: there is no need to "pun"—for Farrell has already criticized others for exploiting the "affective, punning quality" of the word "unsettlement" (7)—to tell us that that the protagonist/victim synchronicity that Kelly and Bennelong apparently sham is an "unsettling fact" (13) that informs Farrell's readings. Indeed, to unsettle so iconic a figure as Kelly is not just a dialectic but also a dialogue among genres: cinematically, as Farrell points out, Kelly has been played on film "by both Mick Jagger and Heath Ledger," while culinarily Kelly's "image is used to sell pork in Castlemaine" (13). (Introduction)

' (Introduction)

Writing Australian Unsettlement : Modes of Poetic Invention 1796–1945, by Michael Farrell Christopher Kelen , 2016 single work review essay
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 2 2016;
'This is important work. It’s a rollick and a good read and, importantly, it takes us where we wouldn’t ordinarily or otherwise be going. It doesn’t necessarily take us the way we’d want to go, but then, which worthwhile book does? The important thing is that the journey is worth making.' (Publication abstract)
Country & Western Robert Wood , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , September no. 7 2017;

'That poetry is implicated with politics is incontrovertible.  As Theodore Adorno writes ‘art exists in the real world and has a function in it, and the two are connected by a large number of mediating links.’   Those mediating links however, the things that connect each to the other, are harder to grapple with. What does the daily life of a protest poet look like compared to a conservative one when both work in a modern university? What poetry does the politician read?' (Introduction)

Who's Afraid of Poetic Invention? Anthologising Australian Poetry in the Twenty-First Century A.J. Carruthers , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 17 no. 2 2018;

'There has been a rich history of anthologising Australian poetry this far into the twenty-first century. This article claims that contemporary poetics, with a renewed focus on the recoprocal relation between cultural and linguistic inquiry, can rediscover alternative ways of reading the history of Australian avant-garde, inventive and experimental work. Considering several key anthologies published after the turn of last century, the article provides readings of both the frameworks the anthology-makers provide and the poems themselves, claiming that mark, trace and lexical segmentivities can already be read as social. It then proposes a new possibility for an experimental anthology that might bring these facets into lived praxis: the chrestomathy.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 29 Mar 2017 10:25:05
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