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Issue Details: First known date: 2015... 2015 The Wanarn Painters of Place and Time : Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'David Brooks is an anthropologist who has worked with the Ngaanyatjarra people, including the people at Wanarn, for over twenty-five years. He researched and wrote the connection reports through which they gained native title rights over the huge tract of the Australian Western Desert that is their home, and has worked with them on matters from negotiating with mining companies to facing the challenges of making education meaningful to the youth. He has written extensively on the rich desert Tjukurrpa and art, and on the layers of social and cultural interconnectedness of the people.' (Source: TROVE)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2015
    • Crawley, Inner Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: UWA Publishing , 2015 .
      image of person or book cover 4747088833833188844.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 100p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Published 3 December 2015
      • Includes bibliography
      ISBN: 9781742585536, 1742585531

Works about this Work

[Review] Warnan [sic] Painters of Place and Time : Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa Robert Hoskin , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 131-132)

'The book, Warnan [sic] Painters of Place and Time, concerns a group of aged painters from a place called Warnan, near the borders of West Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory. These Kayili artists who live in an aged care facility, having worked in a variety of settings including the remote outstation of Patjarr, were involved in the “Warnan painting program which has taken place on Fridays since 2005”. In the light of the book’s title, it is fitting to ask, what place and what time?' (Introduction)

An Ageless Vision : Ngaanyatjarra Late-Life Art and Country Sue Kneebone , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , vol. 23 no. 1 2017;
'The vibrant and ethereal paintings created by elderly Ngaanyatjarra artists enable them to travel back to Country despite residing in an aged-care facility. This is the focus of Wanarn Painters of Place and Time, an insightful interdisciplinary collaboration by art historian David Brooks and anthropologist Darren Jorgensen, whose long association with the Ngaanyatjarra people in the Western Desert is reflected in their familiarity with the artists’ life stories and knowledge of Country. Wanarn community, in far Western Australia near the border with the Northern Territory and South Australia, is situated on an old Ngaanyatjarra campground close to the dreaming track of the Kungkarrangkalpa Tjukurrpa or Seven Sisters Dreaming. Wanarn’s aged-care facility accommodates residents from Docker River, Warburton and Warakurna. Among the various activities provided to residents is a weekly painting program conducted by the nearby Warakurna Arts centre. In this fascinating volume, Brooks and Jorgensen argue that the enigmatic paintings produced by elders in these classes are an expression of ‘tjukurrpa-thinking in action’. ' (Introduction)
An Ageless Vision : Ngaanyatjarra Late-Life Art and Country Sue Kneebone , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Cultural Studies Review , vol. 23 no. 1 2017;
'The vibrant and ethereal paintings created by elderly Ngaanyatjarra artists enable them to travel back to Country despite residing in an aged-care facility. This is the focus of Wanarn Painters of Place and Time, an insightful interdisciplinary collaboration by art historian David Brooks and anthropologist Darren Jorgensen, whose long association with the Ngaanyatjarra people in the Western Desert is reflected in their familiarity with the artists’ life stories and knowledge of Country. Wanarn community, in far Western Australia near the border with the Northern Territory and South Australia, is situated on an old Ngaanyatjarra campground close to the dreaming track of the Kungkarrangkalpa Tjukurrpa or Seven Sisters Dreaming. Wanarn’s aged-care facility accommodates residents from Docker River, Warburton and Warakurna. Among the various activities provided to residents is a weekly painting program conducted by the nearby Warakurna Arts centre. In this fascinating volume, Brooks and Jorgensen argue that the enigmatic paintings produced by elders in these classes are an expression of ‘tjukurrpa-thinking in action’. ' (Introduction)
[Review] Warnan [sic] Painters of Place and Time : Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa Robert Hoskin , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 131-132)

'The book, Warnan [sic] Painters of Place and Time, concerns a group of aged painters from a place called Warnan, near the borders of West Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory. These Kayili artists who live in an aged care facility, having worked in a variety of settings including the remote outstation of Patjarr, were involved in the “Warnan painting program which has taken place on Fridays since 2005”. In the light of the book’s title, it is fitting to ask, what place and what time?' (Introduction)

Last amended 4 Nov 2015 12:56:10
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