Association for the Study of Australian Literature (ASAL)

(Status : Public)
  • ASAL 2017: Registrations open

    Registrations are now open for the 2017 ASAL conference, Looking In, Looking Out: China and Australia. The conference will be held in Melbourne, July 11-14, at the city campuses of Latrobe University, Melbourne University, Library at the Dock and the Wheeler Centre at the State Library. All sites are in the CBD and walkable from each other or accessible on the free City Circle Tram route. Booking accommodation in the CBD, or in inner suburbs such as Fitzroy, Carlton, Richmond or Footscray, on the train or tramlines, would be best.

    The draft program is now available, kicking off with Alice Pung at Library at Docklands:

    http://www.latrobe.edu.au/…/asal-2017-co…/conference-program

    We’ve had many responses to the call for papers and paper-givers will be notified in the next week. We’ve also had wonderful response from Chinese students and senior scholars, and are assembling a great list of participants. Keynote speakers include Professor Wang Labao, translator Professor Li Yao, inaugural Billiton Chair of Australian Studies at Renmin University Beijing, Professor David Walker, writer Alice Pung, and many others. Email ASAL2017@latrobe.edu.au to register your interest on our conference mailing list.

    To update your membership please click here

    Please visit the conference website at: www.latrobe.edu.au/ASAL2017 for more information and to register.


    Early bird registration fees end on 31 May.

  • Event: Lionel Fogarty Selected Poems Book Launch

    6:30pm, 23 June, Bella Union, Melbourne.

    Please see the following link for the details:

    https://whatson.melbourne.vic.gov.au/Whatson/Exhibitions/Art/Pages/b4680ee3-63d7-46b8-b01a-4e923aee8233.aspx

  • Deadline extended: Call For Papers: 2018 Literary Studies Convention: The Literary Interface

    The deadline for panel and paper submissions for the 2018 Literary Studies Convention has been extended to 25 August, 2017.

    The Convention will be held at Australian National University, Canberra, from 4-7 July 2018.

    This convention will bring together scholars working across the broad field of literary studies to discuss the literary as an interface between different forms of knowledge and processes of knowledge formation, looking at questions of how and through what means the literary is communicated, represented, negotiated, and remade. By placing the concept of the literary centre-stage while at the same time interrogating its role as an interface, we wish to open up for discussion questions about the role, dynamism, and value of the literary in a time of institutional change and ongoing disciplinary formation. We would also like to debate the role of the literary text - and literary studies as a discipline - as a site of encounter between diverse languages and potentially alien modes of reading and writing.

    Invoking the possibility of melding, soldering, and/or merging different elements, the literary interface suggests the resilience as well as the suppleness of disciplinary boundaries. It conjures the possibility of new meeting points; zones of contact and interaction but also sites of contention and disruption that might challenge received platitudes yet help us to bring to the surface new meanings.

    We invite papers and panel proposals, including but not limited to the following topics:


    • Mediation, remediation, and transmediation
    • Literary Formalism - its past, present and/or future
    • Multimedia forms as interfaces
    • The relationship between forms, networks, and hierarchies
    • Encounters between readers and modes of reading
    • Translation
    • The relationship between literary studies and other disciplines, e.g., environmental studies, maths, ethnography, science
    • The interface between academic and public critical cultures
    • Spaces of reading (online and otherwise)
    • The negotiation of literary value
    • The classroom as literary interface
    • Literary objects as interfaces: circulation, reception, paratexts
    • The stage and other spaces of performance as interface between temporalities, bodies, performers, writers and audiences
    • Cultural interfaces
    • Languages of colonialists/postcoloniality
    • Transnationalism and minor transnationalism.

    Deadline for submissions: 25 August 2017.

    Please send an abstract of 150 words and biographical note of 100 words to Julieanne.Lamond@anu.edu.au.

    Jointly held by the Association for the Study of Australian Literature, the Australasian Association for Literature, the Australasian Universities Languages and Literature Association, and the Australian University Heads of English.

  • Announcing a new PhD scholarship in International Australian Literary Cultures at UNSW Sydney

    Supervision team: Brigitta Olubas, Elizabeth McMahon, Julian Murphet.

    Australian and International applicants welcome – apply by 10 July for a 2018 start.

    Please see the website for further details and to apply:

    http://www.2025.unsw.edu.au/apply/scientia-phd-scholarships/international-australian-literary-cultures

    onal-australian-literary-cultures

  • Call For Papers: AAALS annual conference: Australian Literature as World Literature

    5 - 7 April, 2018, New York University, Center for Applied Liberal Arts

    The AAALS is pleased to announce its 33rd annual conference, to take place at New York University, Center for Applied Liberal Arts, on 5 - 7 April, 2018. Peter Minter will be the featured poet and Brigitta Olubas will give the academic keynote; Peter Carey will give a reading on the first day of the conference. More special guests may be announced so please stay tuned for subsequent updates.

    The topic is “Australian Literature as World Literature.” Proposals on any aspect of Australian and New Zealand literature are welcomed. Particularly encouraged are papers that connect Australian and New Zealand literature of any era with works produced elsewhere or which place these works in a broader global context. Cosmopolitan, trans-Indigenous, Asia-Pacific, Global South, diasporic, digital humanities, book history and comparative approaches are welcome, as are any others that are relevant. Though the literatures of the Antipodes are worlded in many complex ways, discussion of ‘the global’ has tended to marginalize them. At a moment when the status of globalization itself seems problematic, this conference hopes to make an argument for the pertinence of literature from Australia and New Zealand to the global imaginative conversation.

    Please send 300 word proposals to Nicholas Birns (nb2003@nyu.edu) by 1 October, 2017.

  • Call for Papers: Science/Literature

    A panel session on the interface between science and literature is proposed for the July 2018 Literary Studies Convention in Canberra. This will be followed by a special issue in Australian Humanities Review, edited by Jessica White and Clare Archer-Lean.

    In keeping with ‘The Literary Interface’ theme of the Literary Convention, in particular its definition of an interface as ‘an apparatus designed to connect two scientific instruments so that they can be operated jointly’, we welcome proposals which explore ways in which literature can translate, communicate, or re-imagine the systematic study of human and/or non-human worlds.

    Please send proposals of 200 words, for an essay or a conference paper or both, by 25 June 2017 to Jessica White (jessica.white@uq.edu.au) and Clare Archer-Lean (Carcher@usc.edu.au).

  • Call for Papers: OzWallace 2017

    September 1 - 3, Melbourne, Australia

    On behalf of OzWallace 2017, the Conference Committee is sponsoring a call for academic, creative and alternative academic papers relating to all areas concerning the work of David Foster Wallace.

    The Committee welcomes papers on any Wallace-related topic. Suggested topics may include:

    • Wallace and gender

    • Wallace and race

    • Wallace and world literature

    • Wallace and current events

    Authors of accepted papers will be invited to present their work at OzWallace 2017. Successful applicants should aim for a twenty-minute talk. Authors will usually be matched with one or two other participants in a panel, and should allow for a twenty-minute question and answer session after each panel.

    Proposals for entire panels are also encouraged.

    Call For Papers Timetable:

    Timely submission of the papers is critical to the success of the OzWallace 2017. The procedures and timetable enumerated below will apply.

    1. Deadline for Proposals

    By 31 July 2017, authors should submit a 200-word abstract for their papers including the title, a short description of the topic(s) to be addressed, and the approach that will be taken. Proposals, along with authors’ contact information and a 100-word biography, should be submitted via e-mail to the Conference chair, Tony McMahon, at tony.mcmahon@rmit.edu.au. Please put "OzWallace 2017" in the subject line.

    2. Acceptance of Proposals

    By 7 August 2017, the Conference Committee will make a decision on all proposals. The number of accepted proposals might be limited. The Committee will contact authors regarding their proposals.

    The Conference Committee looks forward to receiving proposals in response to the call, and is happy to respond to inquiries from interested parties.

    Questions may be addressed to Tony McMahon via e-mail:

    tony.mcmahon@rmit.edu.au. Your participation in this effort to produce new work on David Foster Wallace will contribute to the written body of knowledge on this author and to the success of OzWallace 2017.

  • McKenzie Postdoctoral Fellowship

    The McKenzie Postdoctoral Fellowship application round at the University of Melbourne will soon be open: http://research.unimelb.edu.au/work-with-us/funding/internal/mckenzie-fellowship

    Recent humanities PhD graduates are encouraged to apply. If you have an interest in the Australian humanities (in any area or areas: literature, cinema, media studies, art history etc.) and are thinking about a postdoctoral project that might suit the McKenzie Fellowship, please contact Professor Ken Gelder at the Australian Centre, University of Melbourne: kdgelder@unimelb.edu.au.

  • Call for Papers: EASA Biennial Conference: Nationalism Old and New: Europe, Australia and Their Others

    Wed 17 - Fri 19 January 2018, University of Barcelona

    Deadline extended to 1 July

    Europe is uncomfortably enmeshed in what is commonly perceived as a fight for social, political and cultural survival in the face of the increasing international circulation of capital and labour, the postcolonial aftermath of Empire and the growing, transnational impact of climate change—in short, the multifarious expressions of unstoppable globalisation. What started as a pragmatic need to control and eliminate continental conflict and an idealistic intent to preserve the gains of the welfare state in democratic Europe after the Second World War, has, after half a century of attempted and effectual integration, run up against its real and imagined limits.

    Bearing in mind the above context, this conference aims to explore the following questions:


    • How do Europe and Australia respond to the growing internationalisation of issues once deemed managable on the national level, be they of an economic, demographic, social, political or climatic kind?
    • To what extent is the re/turn to nationalism a credible and viable response to the problems that assail both continents? Are these the product of a common sense or fear?
    • What are the structural links between European and Australian policies towards migration, refugees and asylum seekers?
    • To what extent do the above issues affect the inequalities of ethnicity, class and gender already existent in both continents? To what extent is religion a factor of division?
    • To what extent is European identity a “question mark”, an identity in de/re/construction (Julia Kristeva in Ignacio Vidal-Folch’s interview, El Pais, 3 June 2008), and how does the recent context of fear, racism and intolerance impact on this process?
    • Likewise, to what extent is Australianness a postcolonial question mark rather than a neutral marker of identity? What is the place of ‘New Settlers’ and Indigenous peoples in the nationstate?
    • What are the connections/disconnections between European and Australian approaches to developing a human rights culture? What is the place of migrant peoples and Indigeneity in future expressions of Europeanness and Australianness? To what extent may/do European and Australian (policies of) identity inform and solicit each other?
    • How may discourses of Indigeneity influence notions of Europeanness? To what extent is Europe afraid of being ‘Aboriginalised’, that is, of suffering the same fate that Indigenous Australians experienced under European colonisation?
    • What can the role of Australian Studies be from the perspective of Europe in terms of furthering an understanding of politics of in/tolerance and in/exclusion?

    Due to the cross-disciplinary character of this Conference we shall consider papers on topics relating to any branch of Australian and European Studies inasmuch they inform each other and overlap, including History, Literature, Culture, Film Studies, Cultural Anthropology, Media Studies, Architecture, Geography, Spatial Studies, Environment, Political Science, Indigenous Studies, Gender Studies, Gerontology, Linguistics, Translation Studies, Education, Sociology, Art History, Religion, Philosophy. We welcome proposals for papers and panels that address but are not restricted to the following topics:

    • Connections and disconnections between European and Australian approaches to developing a human rights culture;
    • Problematizing mainstream immigration, refugee and integration policies;
    • Diasporic ‘takes’ on Australian and European identity in politics, literature and the visual arts;
    • Ghosts of the past: the ideological and material inheritance of Empire and the World Wars.
    • The exclusiveness of nationalist communities and arguments;
    • Territorial fragmentation and globalisation;
    • The analysis of discourses of Indigeneity and new settlement in the European and Australian context and their cross-overs;
    • Inherited responsibilities and the moral requirements of belonging;
    • Transnational perspectives on Australian and European culture, society and/or history;
    • Islam, the ‘war’ on terror and the revival of nationalisms in Europe and Australia.

    Please send your 250-word abstracts for 20 minute papers and 100-word bio notes (easa2018bcn@gmail.com) by 1 July 2017. We do encourage panel proposals, which should be accompanied by a 100-word overall abstract in addition to the 250-word abstracts for a panel’s individual papers. Notification of acceptance/rejection of abstracts will be sent by 1 July 2017. All accepted participants will be expected to become members of the EASA as a precondition to presenting their papers.

    Details of EASA membership are available on the association’s website at this address: http://www.easa-australianstudies.net/easa/office. A call for full-academic-length papers derived from conference presentations will be issued after the conference for publication in the Association’s online journal JEASA (http://www.easaaustralianstudies.net/ejournal/call).

    A conference website is under construction; full details on registration etc. are to be made public shortly.

    A PDF flyer is available here

  • Call For Books of Australian Literary and Historical Interest

    The Centre for Stories is looking for books. We plan to open a public reading room where people can come and relax in a comfortable and quiet environment filled with great reading material. To date, we have received National Geographic Magazines, science fiction, literary short stories and Australiana. We are looking for all kinds of books and would love to take them off your hands. If you have books, we can come and meet you to discuss what the next step is. For more information please email Robert Wood (robert@centreforstories.com)

    http://www.centreforstories.com/story-collecting-western-australia/wanted-books

  • Mary Gilmore Award shortlist announced

    The Mary Gilmore Award is to be given for the best first book of poetry published in the previous calendar year.


    Shortlist:

    Glasshouses - Stuart Barnes (UQP)

    Sydney Road Poems - Carmine Frascarelli (rabbit)

    False Nostalgia - Aden Rolfe (Giramondo)

    Lemons in the Chicken Wire - Alison Whittaker (Magabala)


    highly commended:

    Lake - Claire Nashar (cordite)

  • ALS Gold Medal short list announced

    Steven Amsterdam The Easy Way Out (Hachette)

    Georgia Blain Between a Wolf and a Dog (Scribe)

    Peter Boyle, Ghostspeaking (Vagabond)

    Zoe Morrison Music and Freedom (Vintage)

    Heather Rose The Museum of Modern Love (Allen & Unwin)

    Rajith Savanadasa, Ruins (Hachette)

  • Call for Papers: Independent Publishing Conference 2017: The Legacies of Publishing

    16 - 18 November, the Wheeler Centre, Melbourne.

    Every book leaves a legacy; every publisher inherits one. Publishing is a space governed by pre-existing conventions and expectations. Some of these are codified by copyright laws and business contracts; others, like the placement of bibliographical information, are merely conventions of habit. As a consequence, twenty-first century books remain largely recognisable as close siblings of the objects produced by Gutenberg. While the book remains remarkably unchanged, the processes of writing, editing, typesetting, printing, distributing and buying books continue to change—sometimes slowly and sometimes dramatically. Magazines have gone from having to compete with the upstarts of the desktop-publishing revolution to competing with bloggers and social-media clickbait. New technologies reshape certain publishing sectors and skip over others, remaking genres like romance publishing while leaving literary fiction largely untouched.

    Digital platforms like Wordpress and Twitter provide accessible platforms for activists to publish and disseminate their work. But traditional publishing, both mainstream and academic, also continues to offer platforms that enable authors and publishers to agitate for social change. Both the VIDA and the Stella Count demonstrate the very real need for feminist interventions in publishing—and we are only now beginning to recognise the need for intersectional interventions that address the historical and ongoing marginalisation of other social and cultural groups within the structures of the publishing industry. As global and domestic developments have proven, progress isn’t guaranteed, but publishing offers at least some potential tools of resistance.

    We seek papers that engage with publishing’s past and its future: that identify and explore aspects of technological, political and social change. Although our preference is for papers that focus on independent publishing, presentations on all aspects of publishing are welcome. We are also interested in papers from related disciplines, such as literary studies, creative writing, and media and communication studies. Graduate students and early career researchers are encouraged to submit. Possible topics might include:

    • Legacy conventions in contemporary publishing
    • Disruption and change
    • Challenging gender norms
    • The tyranny of Word in an XML age
    • Legacy systems
    • Legacies of marginalisation
    • Publishing nostalgia
    • Publishing the future
    • Early adopters and late adapters
    • First-mover advantage and disadvantage
    • Baby boomers and books
    • Millennial readers
    • Children’s books in the twenty-first century
    • Digital storytelling
    • The lessons of the gaming industry
    • The book online.

    The 2017 Independent Publishing Conference will run from Thursday 16 to Saturday 18 November at the Wheeler Centre, Melbourne. Academic panels will be held on Thursday 16 November.

    We invite proposals by Thursday 29 June 2017. Proposals should contain an abstract of 200 to 300 words. Please include your paper title, institutional affiliation, bio-note, contact details, and any social media handles in the abstract. Submissions and enquiries should be sent to Millicent Weber (millicent.weber@unimelb.edu.au).

  • Call for Papers: Genre Worlds: Popular Fiction in the 21st Century

    10 November 2017, State Library of Queensland, Brisbane

    “All artistic work... involves the joint activity of a number, often a large number, of people…. The work always shows signs of that cooperation” - Howard S. Becker, Art Worlds.

    Popular fiction is one of the most dynamic cultural and commercial divisions of twenty-first century publishing. Internally, it is organised along the lines of genres, creating what we call ‘genre worlds.’ This conference will consider the ways that contemporary genre worlds function as sectors of the publishing industry, as social and cultural formations, and as bodies of texts. Who is publishing popular fiction? Who is reading it? How do genre communities form, and how do texts circulate within them? How are terms like popular fiction, genre fiction, commercial fiction and trade publishing used, and what do they suggest about the way that popular fiction is conceived of and valued, by the industry and academy alike?

    We invite abstracts for presentations on aspects of Australian and international popular fiction genres, industries, markets and communities. Submissions are welcome from scholars across the humanities and social science disciplines, including those working in cultural studies, publishing studies, sociology, cultural economics, literary studies and creative writing. Possible topics include:

    • Close and distant reading of works of contemporary popular fiction
    • Career trajectories and models of authorship in popular fiction, within and across genres
    • Social media and popular fiction
    • Distribution and routes to readers, including studies of booksellers, libraries, and the use of advanced reading copies
    • Popular fiction readers, reading practices, and fan cultures
    • Pleasure and popular fiction
    • The material formats of genre texts and paratexts, including studies of ebooks, print books, and audiobooks
    • Systems of value and gatekeeping in popular fiction, including blogging, reviewing, booktubing, bestseller lists, prizes, festivals, and events
    • Genre writing and reading groups, both online and offline
    • The spaces and places of popular fiction, including studies of book tourism
    • The economics of genre fiction: persistent and emergent business models, including self-publishing, author services, marketing strategies, and sales patterns

    Plans for publications arising from the conference include a special issue of Australian Literary Studies. To be considered for inclusion, full papers of between 5,000 and 10,000 words will be due by 9 December 2017.

    200-300 word abstracts should be sent to Kim Wilkins (k.wilkins@uq.edu.au) at the School of Communication & Arts, University of Queensland, by 21 April 2017.

    Academic Conference in association with GenreCon.

    Convenors: Dr Kim Wilkins, Dr Beth Driscoll, and Dr Lisa Fletcher

  • Long list announced for the ALS Gold Medal

    Adam Aitken One Hundred Letters Home (Vagabond)

    Steven Amsterdam The Easy Way Out (Hachette)

    Georgia Blain Between a Wolf and a Dog (Scribe)

    Peter Boyle, Ghostspeaking (Vagabond)

    Michelle Cahill Letters to Pessoa (Giramondo)

    Tina Giannoukos Bull Days (Arcadia)

    Dennis Haskell Ahead of Us (Fremantle)

    Fiona McFarlane The High Places (Penguin/Hamish Hamilton)

    Zoe Morrison Music and Freedom (Vintage)

    Sean Rabin Wood Green (Giramondo)

    Heather Rose The Museum of Modern Love (Allen & Unwin)

    Rajith Savandasa, Ruins (Hachette)

  • Call for Submissions JEASA: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia General Issue 1, 2017

    JEASA - The Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia invites you to submit original articles for the new issue in 2017. This issue has no specific theme so we welcome articles presenting any topic that falls within Australian studies, including History, Literature, Culture, Film Studies, Cultural Anthropology, Media Studies, Architecture, Geography, Spatial Studies, Environment, Political Science, Indigenous Studies, Gender Studies, Linguistics, Translation Studies, Education, Sociology, Art History, Religion, Philosophy, Music, etc. All submitted articles will be peer reviewed.

    Please submit your proposals by 1 April, 2017 to the JEASA general editor, Dr. Martina Horakova (mhorakov@phil.muni.cz)

    Please remove your name and any indications of your authorship from the text and write your name, affiliation, and a 150-word bio in a separate document. Submissions must follow these guidelines: Articles should be between 5,000-8,000 words long, Times New Roman, 12 point font, single spaced. The title should be followed by abstract and 5-6 keywords. In-text references and bibliography must follow the latest MLA style of documenting sources. Articles written by nonnative speakers must be proofread by a native English speaker prior to submission. A detailed style sheet is available at the journal’s website: http://www.easa-australianstudies.net/ejournal

  • Call for Papers: AAL Literary Environments conference 2017: Place, Planet and Translation

    17-19 July, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus

    Literary Environments is concerned with the different environments in which literature can occur, and our methods of translating between them. At this critical juncture in the Anthropocene, planetary responsibility and situated knowledges need to be entwined in propositions for social and environmental justice. Bodies, texts and artworks are converging in old and new forms of politics and earthly accountabilities. The task of translation between these increasingly interconnected modes of existence is a crucial one: life in all of its manifestations – from DNA to forests – has textual qualities. What does it mean to ‘read’ such a staggering variety of data?

    We welcome proposals for individual papers and panels addressing any aspect of literature and the environment, including:

    • Zoopoetics, animal art and critical animal studies
    • Indigenous literatures from around the world and their transcultural relation
    • Literature of the Anthropocene, including cli-fi and other responses to climate change
    • Local, urban, and global ecological imaginaries
    • Indigenous ecologies and knowledges
    • Ecological ethics and law
    • Environmental attitudes in pre-Romantic writing
    • Romantic and anti-Romantic environmental sensibilities
    • Literary translation
    • Posthumanism, new materialism and dark ecologies
    • Intersections of aesthetic, political and scientific treatments of environmental issues

    While this conference is primarily concerned with literature, we envisage it as a multi-disciplinary event. We invite papers on any aspect of the environmental humanities, from environmental history to environmental philosophy. We also welcome papers addressing literary environments that are not ecological in orientation, such as studies of literary spaces, communities, and so on. We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers and panels comprising 3 papers.

    Please submit an abstract of 200 words (maximum) and a brief bio as PDF documents to the following email address by 15 March 2017:

    aalconference@griffith.edu.au

    Accepted papers will be announced by 1 April 2017. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a special issue of a peer-reviewed journal. For inquiries about the conference, please email one of the conference convenors:

    Dr Stuart Cooke (stuart.cooke@griffith.edu.au)

    Dr Peter Denney (p.denney@griffith.edu.au)

  • Call for Papers: 2018 Literary Studies Convention, The Literary Interface

    4-7 July, 2018, Australian National University, Canberra

    An interface describes a surface or plane that lies between or joins two points in space, but it also refers to ‘a means or place of interaction between two systems’ and ‘an apparatus designed to connect two scientific instruments so that they can be operated jointly’ (OED).

    This convention will bring together scholars working across the broad field of literary studies to discuss the literary as an interface between different forms of knowledge and processes of knowledge formation, looking at questions of how and through what means the literary is communicated, represented, negotiated, and remade. By placing the concept of the literary centre-stage while at the same time interrogating its role as an interface, we wish to open up for discussion questions about the role, dynamism, and value of the literary in a time of institutional change and ongoing disciplinary formation. We would also like to debate the role of the literary text - and literary studies as a discipline - as a site of encounter between diverse languages and potentially alien modes of reading and writing. Confirmed keynotes include Rey Chow and Lauren Goodlad.

    We invite papers and panel proposals, including but not limited to the following topics:

    • Mediation, remediation, and transmediation
    • Literary Formalism - its past, present and/or future
    • Multimedia forms as interfaces
    • The relationship between forms, networks, and hierarchies
    • Encounters between readers and modes of reading
    • Translation
    • The relationship between literary studies and other disciplines, e.g., environmental studies, maths, ethnography, science
    • The interface between academic and public critical cultures
    • Spaces of reading (online and otherwise)
    • The negotiation of literary value
    • The classroom as literary interface
    • Literary objects as interfaces: circulation, reception, paratexts
    • The stage and other spaces of performance as interface between temporalities, bodies, performers, writers and audiences
    • Cultural interfaces
    • Languages of colonialists/postcoloniality
    • Transnationalism and minor transnationalism.

    Abstracts due 1 July, 2017. Please send abstracts of 150 words and biographical notes of 100 words to Julieanne Lamond (julienne.lamond@anu.edu.au).

  • The Colin Roderick Award

    The 2016 Shortlist (and winner) for best book published in Australian which deals with any aspect of Australian life, in 2015, is now public:

    Jones, Gail. A Guide to Berlin. * Winner

    Niall, Brenda. Mannix.

    Harding, Leslie and Morgan, Kendrah. Modern Love.

    Collins, Christie. The End of Seeing.

    Kinsella, John. Crow’s Breath.

    Winton, Tim. Island Home.

    The Colin Roderick Award is dedicated to the memory of Professor Colin Roderick (1911 - 2000), founder of the Foundation for Australian Literary Studies based at James Cook University. Professor Roderick was a writer, editor, academic and educator. This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Foundation, commemorated with a town-hall style symposium at James Cook University in which Professors Carole Ferrier and Leigh Dale, as well as Associate Professor Katherine Bode and writers Sarah Holland-Batt and Ariella Van Luyn addressed issue of the Stella Count and the profile of women writers in Australia.

    The Award, commenced in 1967 as $500 prize (generous for its day) is now worth $20,000. Coupled with the silver H.T. Priestley Medal it recognises the best original book of the previous year. In 2016, the judges read over 150 entries submitted from publishers across Australia, in the areas of history, fiction, literary journalism, poetry, biography and memoir, politics, and more.

    Publications entered for the Award may be in any field of Australian writing, whether verse or prose, but must be published in Australia (they may be printed elsewhere) and deal with an aspect of Australian life.

    For further details please see: jcu.edu.au/fals

  • Event: Seminar Series: Francis Webb: God’s Fool: A Survey of this Australian Catholic poet’s work by his biographer.

    10am – 12 noon, 7 – 24 February, 2017, Level 5, 141 Harrington Street, Sydney.

    One two hour seminar each week for four weeks on Tuesday 7, 14, and 21 February and Friday 24 February, 2017 from 10am – 12 noon. With his characteristic capacity to engage and draw forth the best from the participants Michael will unveil the depth and insights of Francis Webb – the subject of his Doctorate. Webb has been acclaimed by Sir Herbert Read as being “One of the greatest poets of our time … one of the must unjustly neglected poets of the century.”

    Michael is Associate Professor in Literature at Australian Catholic University, has a special interest in the relationship between the Sacred in Literature and the Arts, has co-curated a number of recent conferences: Writing the Sacred (2102), Addressing the Sacred (2013) and Grounding the Sacred (2015). On 6 July 2017 at the ACU Strathfield campus Michael is hosting an event: Awakening the Sacred with Fr Lawrence Freeman, Rachael Kohn and Professors David Tacey and Sasha Grishin. Please assist us by registering before classes commence.

    Please see www.aquinas-academy.com for further details.

    For more information please email: secretary@aquinas-academy.com

  • Cultural Studies in Australia and China

    7 July 2016, Shanghai Jiaotong University

    A proposal has arisen from discussions with Professor Peng Qinglong of Shanghai Jiaotong University to hold a one-day symposium/workshop on 7 July to discuss work in cultural/media studies in China and Australia and the potential for building stronger relations and collaboration between researchers in the two countries. At present there is little contact between Chinese cultural/media studies scholars and Chinese Australian Studies scholars, and there is an enormous amount of potential for putting Australian cultural/media studies scholars in closer contact with their Chinese counterparts. One proposal to be discussed is the establishment of a Sino-Australian Cultural Studies Association.

    Professor Peng is keen to involve Australian scholars and researchers in the event and he has approval from his university and funds to cover accommodation and local costs. It is not likely to have formal papers but rather reports on current work and brainstorming about the potential of such an Association. Those attending would also have the possibility of attending the Chinese Australian Studies Association conference which is taking place in Beijing, at Peking University, immediately afterwards, 8-10 July. Please see the website for details: http://pkuasc.fasic.org.au/2016-australian-studies-conference-pku/.

    If you’re interested in attending the event, or interested in following developments but unable to attend this particular event, please contact David Carter (david.carter@uq.edu.au).

  • Australian Studies in China

    Have you ever wondered what to do with all of those Australian journals on your bookshelf?

    ASAL aims to reach out to Chinese scholars by helping to establish or consolidate print-based research collections, particularly journals and magazines such as Australian Literary Studies, Journal of Australian Studies, Meanjin, Southerly, Quadrant etc.

    If you have runs of these journals and magazines that you wish to donate to a Chinese Australian Studies Centre, please contact ASAL Treasurer, Roger Osborne (r.osborne@uq.edu.au), who will arrange for their collection and distribution.

  • Teaching Australian literature?: Help keep Aust Lit up to date

    AustLit collects information about the teaching of Australian literature texts at universities and tertiary institutions around Australia and internationally, and links to this information from the work and author records.

    At a glance, AustLit tells you:

    • how, where, and in what context, a particular text is taught
    • what degree or course the text is part of
    • which Australian texts are taught with non-Australian texts in thematically driven courses, such as nineteenth century women’s writing, popular fictions, eco-criticism, drama, life writing, etc.

    So, if you’re teaching Australian texts in your university class, please send AustLit the:

    • titles of set works
    • course code and course title
    • contact details

    to info@austlit.edu.au or k.kilner@up.edu.au

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