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form y separately published work icon The Infinite Man single work   film/TV   science fiction   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 2014... 2014 The Infinite Man
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'THE INFINITE MAN is a time travel comedy-romance about a man whose attempts to construct the ultimate romantic weekend backfire when he traps his lover in an infinite loop.' (Production summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Theorising Film Festivals as Distributors and Investigating the Post-Festival Distribution of Australian Films Lauren Carroll Harris , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 11 no. 2 2017; (p. 46-58)

This paper theorises film festivals as distribution circuits, positioning film festivals in the broader cinema ecology to assess their role in delivering local films to local audiences. Recasting current research trends into film festivals through the lens of distribution enables us to see how festivals function as more than another exhibition screen - as a type of distributor. I offer a case study of Sydney Film Festival to explore the following research questions: What is the distributive function and nature of film festivals for Australian films? What happens to local titles following their festival runs? How can we explain the gap between Australian films' continued popularity at film festivals and their continued under-performance in the rest of the marketplace? In answering these questions, this article demonstrates how film festivals have become crucial to both the Australian film industry and the cinema industry at large over the last 10 years, to the point that they have almost replaced the art-house circuit and come to provide an essential, highly specialised distribution channel for small to medium budget films. For this reason, I argue that material and economic drivers are as essential to the current boon in film festivals as cultural ones, and that the film festival circuit has not been able to address the problem of distribution for auteurist, independent and art cinema in an age of digitisation. I present evidence that localises, concretises and specifies festival research, suggesting the major festivals in Australia are an increasingly discrete and self-contained distribution sector within the wider cinema ecology, which has significant implications for theorisations of festivals as feeders for theatrical circuits.

Countdown : Australia's Top Ten Sci-Fi Films Erin Free , 2017 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 20 April 2017;
A Screen Siren in the Making Penelope Debelle , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 16 May 2015; (p. 32)
Overthinking Luke Davies , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Monthly , October no. 105 2014; (p. 76-77)

— Review of The Infinite Man Hugh Sullivan , 2014 single work film/TV
The Sin of Repitition David Stratton , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 September 2014; (p. 14)

— Review of The Infinite Man Hugh Sullivan , 2014 single work film/TV
The Infinite Man - Playing with Time Craig Mathieson , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 1 August 2014; (p. 5)

— Review of The Infinite Man Hugh Sullivan , 2014 single work film/TV
Promising Debut but More Work Wouldn't Have Hurt Jake Wilson , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 18 September 2014; (p. 32)

— Review of The Infinite Man Hugh Sullivan , 2014 single work film/TV
The Infinite Man Review – Playful Sci-fi with Masterful Plot Manoeuvres Luke Buckmaster , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 18 September 2014;

— Review of The Infinite Man Hugh Sullivan , 2014 single work film/TV
Falling in Love Again and Again Is Tedious Jake Wilson , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 19 September 2014; (p. 15)

— Review of The Infinite Man Hugh Sullivan , 2014 single work film/TV
The Sin of Repitition David Stratton , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 September 2014; (p. 14)

— Review of The Infinite Man Hugh Sullivan , 2014 single work film/TV
A Screen Siren in the Making Penelope Debelle , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 16 May 2015; (p. 32)
Countdown : Australia's Top Ten Sci-Fi Films Erin Free , 2017 single work column
— Appears in: FilmInk , 20 April 2017;
Theorising Film Festivals as Distributors and Investigating the Post-Festival Distribution of Australian Films Lauren Carroll Harris , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 11 no. 2 2017; (p. 46-58)

This paper theorises film festivals as distribution circuits, positioning film festivals in the broader cinema ecology to assess their role in delivering local films to local audiences. Recasting current research trends into film festivals through the lens of distribution enables us to see how festivals function as more than another exhibition screen - as a type of distributor. I offer a case study of Sydney Film Festival to explore the following research questions: What is the distributive function and nature of film festivals for Australian films? What happens to local titles following their festival runs? How can we explain the gap between Australian films' continued popularity at film festivals and their continued under-performance in the rest of the marketplace? In answering these questions, this article demonstrates how film festivals have become crucial to both the Australian film industry and the cinema industry at large over the last 10 years, to the point that they have almost replaced the art-house circuit and come to provide an essential, highly specialised distribution channel for small to medium budget films. For this reason, I argue that material and economic drivers are as essential to the current boon in film festivals as cultural ones, and that the film festival circuit has not been able to address the problem of distribution for auteurist, independent and art cinema in an age of digitisation. I present evidence that localises, concretises and specifies festival research, suggesting the major festivals in Australia are an increasingly discrete and self-contained distribution sector within the wider cinema ecology, which has significant implications for theorisations of festivals as feeders for theatrical circuits.

Last amended 14 Apr 2015 13:02:36
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