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Phormio (International) assertion single work   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 161 BCE... 161 BCE Phormio
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Production Details

  • Performed at the University of Sydney, January 1868.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 161 BCE
Language: Latin

Works about this Work

The University Dramatic Entertainment 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 February vol. 19 no. 1295 1868; (p. 8)

An editorial on the subject of the university performance, for the entertainment of his Royal Highness, the Duke of Edinburgh', of Terence's Phormio (in Latin) and Molière's Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (in French). The editorial writer disputes the suitability of these plays on the grounds of their corrupt morality and general unfitness for a Christian audience.

Visit of the Duke of Edinburgh 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Empire , 1 February no. 5055 1868; (p. 2)

A detailed account of H. R. H. Prince Alfred, The Duke of Edinburgh's visit to Sydney during January 1868. The account includes a paragraph headed 'Dramatic Performance at the University', referring to productions of Phormio and Monsieur de Pourceaugnac.

Untitled 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Empire , 30 January no. 5053 1868; (p. 2)

The Empire's editorial writer comments on the recent production by the University of Sydney of plays by Terence and Moliere. While the writer admits there are advantages to the presentation of plays in Latin and French, [he] is ‘decidedly of the opinion that English dramas should not be excluded from the University play bills. Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, and Beaumont and Fletcher should take their place with Terence and Moliere, and the public might thus be much entertained on the one hand as the the students would be improved on the other.'

Dramatic Performance at the University 1868 single work review
— Appears in: The Empire , 25 January no. 5049 1868; (p. 4)

— Review of Monsieur de Pourceaugnac Moliere , 1669 single work drama ; Phormio Terence , 161 BCE single work drama

Review of Phormio of Terence (in Latin) and Molière's Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (in French), performed at the Hall of the University of Sydney 'in the presence of his Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, the Earl and Countess of Belmore, the members of the Senate, the Professors and Officers of the University, and several officers of the Army and Navy, and a fashionable assembly of about four hundred people'.

A Dramatic Performance : Phormio of Terence, &c. 1868 single work advertisement
— Appears in: The Empire , 17 January no. 5042 1868; (p. 1) The Empire , 18 January no. 5043 1868; (p. 8) The Empire , 20 January no. 5044 1868; (p. 4) The Empire , 21 January no. 5045 1868; (p. 1) The Empire , 22 January no. 5046 1868; (p. 2) The Empire , 23 January no. 5047 1868; (p. 1)

An advertisement for a performance 'by the members of the University for the entertainment of his Royal Highness, the Duke of Edinburgh'. Plays performed: Phormio of Terence (in Latin) and Molière's Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (in French).

Dramatic Performance at the University 1868 single work review
— Appears in: The Empire , 25 January no. 5049 1868; (p. 4)

— Review of Monsieur de Pourceaugnac Moliere , 1669 single work drama ; Phormio Terence , 161 BCE single work drama

Review of Phormio of Terence (in Latin) and Molière's Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (in French), performed at the Hall of the University of Sydney 'in the presence of his Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, the Earl and Countess of Belmore, the members of the Senate, the Professors and Officers of the University, and several officers of the Army and Navy, and a fashionable assembly of about four hundred people'.

A Dramatic Performance : Phormio of Terence, &c. 1868 single work advertisement
— Appears in: The Empire , 17 January no. 5042 1868; (p. 1) The Empire , 18 January no. 5043 1868; (p. 8) The Empire , 20 January no. 5044 1868; (p. 4) The Empire , 21 January no. 5045 1868; (p. 1) The Empire , 22 January no. 5046 1868; (p. 2) The Empire , 23 January no. 5047 1868; (p. 1)

An advertisement for a performance 'by the members of the University for the entertainment of his Royal Highness, the Duke of Edinburgh'. Plays performed: Phormio of Terence (in Latin) and Molière's Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (in French).

Untitled 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Empire , 30 January no. 5053 1868; (p. 2)

The Empire's editorial writer comments on the recent production by the University of Sydney of plays by Terence and Moliere. While the writer admits there are advantages to the presentation of plays in Latin and French, [he] is ‘decidedly of the opinion that English dramas should not be excluded from the University play bills. Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, and Beaumont and Fletcher should take their place with Terence and Moliere, and the public might thus be much entertained on the one hand as the the students would be improved on the other.'

Visit of the Duke of Edinburgh 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Empire , 1 February no. 5055 1868; (p. 2)

A detailed account of H. R. H. Prince Alfred, The Duke of Edinburgh's visit to Sydney during January 1868. The account includes a paragraph headed 'Dramatic Performance at the University', referring to productions of Phormio and Monsieur de Pourceaugnac.

The University Dramatic Entertainment 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 February vol. 19 no. 1295 1868; (p. 8)

An editorial on the subject of the university performance, for the entertainment of his Royal Highness, the Duke of Edinburgh', of Terence's Phormio (in Latin) and Molière's Monsieur de Pourceaugnac (in French). The editorial writer disputes the suitability of these plays on the grounds of their corrupt morality and general unfitness for a Christian audience.

Last amended 30 Jan 2014 10:13:56
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