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y separately published work icon Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project series - publisher   picture book  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project
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Includes

1
y separately published work icon Mamang Kim Scott , Iris Woods , Jeffrey Farmer (illustrator), Helen Nelly (illustrator), Roma Winmar (illustrator), Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2011 Z1807048 2011 single work picture book children's

'A brave young man travels the seas in the abdomen of a large whale ("mamang"). The man squeezes the heart of the whale and the old song he sings spurs it on to take him on a very special journey. It transports him far west of his home country, where his life is changed forever.

'This book is inspired by a story Freddie Winmer told the American linguist Gerhardt Laves at Albany, Western Australia, around 1931. It has been workshopped in a series of community meetings, which included some of Freddie Winmer's contemporary family.

'This story, told in old Noongar, contemporary Noongar and English, captures the deep spiritual connection of the Wirlomin people with the sea.' (From the publisher's website.)

Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2011
2
y separately published work icon Noongar Mambara Bakitj Kim Scott , Lomas Roberts , Geoffrey Woods (illustrator), Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2011 Z1809055 2011 single work picture book children's 'A young man follows a kangaroo track deep into the old people's country. Along the way he meets some spirit creatures ("mambara") who allow him to go on. But after he has hunted down the kangaroo, one mambara is angry and demands a fight ("bakitj"). All day they fight, until the Noongar discovers he is a magic person and defeats the mambara.

'This book is inspired by a story Bob Roberts and Freddie Winmer told the American linguist Gerhardt Laves at Albany, Western Australia, around 1931. It has been workshopped in a series of community meetings, which included some of the contemporary family of both Bob Roberts and Freddie Winmer.

'This story is told in old Noongar, contemporary Noongar and English.' (From the publisher's website.)
Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2011
3
y separately published work icon Dwoort Baal Kaat Dwoort Baal Kaat an Old Story Retold Kim Scott , Russell Nelly , Helen Hall (illustrator), Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2013 6157743 2013 single work picture book children's

A man goes hunting for some tucker with a pack of dogs, but he doesn’t get what he expected. Dwoort Baal Kaat is the story of how two different animals are related to one another.

'This story comes from the wise and ancient language of the First People of the Western Australian south coast, the Noongar people. Inspired by a story George Nelly and Bob Roberts told the linguist Gerhardt Laves at Albany, Western Australia, around 1931, it has been workshopped in a series of community meetings that included some of the contemporary family of both those men, as a part of the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project to revitalise an endangered language.' (Source: UWAP website : uwa.edu.au)

Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2013
4
y separately published work icon Yira Boornak Nyininy Kim Scott , Hazel Brown , Roma Winmar , Anthony Troy Roberts (illustrator), Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2013 6158180 2013 single work picture book children's

'Left stranded in a tree by his wife, a Noongar man has to rely on his Wadjela friend to help him back down. Yira Boornak Nyininy is a story of forgiveness and friendship.'

'This story comes from the wise and ancient language of the First People of the Western Australian south coast, the Noongar people. Inspired by a story Bob Roberts told the linguist Gerhardt Laves at Albany, Western Australia, around 1931, it has been workshopped in a series of community meetings that included some of the contemporary family of Roberts, as a part of the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project to revitalise an endangered language.' (Source: Publishers website)

Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2013
5
y separately published work icon Noorn Kim Scott , R.J. Brown , The Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project , Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2017 12050331 2017 single work prose Indigenous story

'This story comes from the wise and ancient language of the First People of the Western Australian south coast. Noorn is a story of alliances between humans and other living creatures, in this case a snake. It tells of how protective relationships can be nurtured by care and respect.' (Publication summary)

Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2017
6
y separately published work icon Ngaawily Nop : An Old Story Retold Kim Scott , Joyce Cockles , The Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project , Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2017 11570604 2017 single work prose Indigenous story

'This story comes from the wise and ancient language of the First People of the Western Australian south coast. A boy goes looking for his uncle. He discovers family and home at the ocean’s edge, and finds himself as well. Ngaawily Nop is a story of country and family and belonging.'  (Publication summary)

Crawley : UWA Publishing , 2017

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon The Critical Companion to Kim Scott : Readers, Language, Interpretation Ruby Lowe (editor), Philip Morrissey (editor), Marion Campbell (editor), Nedlands : UWA Publishing , 2019 16732062 2019 anthology criticism

'This original collection of essays by emerging and established Aboriginal and Settler scholars provides interpretative and theoretical perspectives on Kim Scott’s work. Twelve essays deal with all of Scott’s novels to date, along with his collaborative non-fiction and his work in the Wirlomin Noongar Stories and Language Project. The collection as a whole amounts to a case for Kim Scott as Australia’s most representative novelist today. 

Over a quarter of a century he has explored and unravelled the intertwined destinies of Aboriginal and Settler from the moment of invasion, contact and occupancy to the contradictory aspirations and government policies of today. In carrying out this project Scott consistently engages with the history and discourses that shape the national imaginary. Paradoxically it is this focus on the national that establishes Kim Scott as an international writer of stature.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

The Wirlomin Project and Kim Scott : Empowering Regional Narratives in a Globalized World of Literature Natalie Quinlivann , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott 2016; (p. 130-145)
Stories Resonate Across Time Heather Zubek , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 18 February 2014; (p. 7)
Stories Resonate Across Time Heather Zubek , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 18 February 2014; (p. 7)
The Wirlomin Project and Kim Scott : Empowering Regional Narratives in a Globalized World of Literature Natalie Quinlivann , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Companion to the Works of Kim Scott 2016; (p. 130-145)
y separately published work icon The Critical Companion to Kim Scott : Readers, Language, Interpretation Ruby Lowe (editor), Philip Morrissey (editor), Marion Campbell (editor), Nedlands : UWA Publishing , 2019 16732062 2019 anthology criticism

'This original collection of essays by emerging and established Aboriginal and Settler scholars provides interpretative and theoretical perspectives on Kim Scott’s work. Twelve essays deal with all of Scott’s novels to date, along with his collaborative non-fiction and his work in the Wirlomin Noongar Stories and Language Project. The collection as a whole amounts to a case for Kim Scott as Australia’s most representative novelist today. 

Over a quarter of a century he has explored and unravelled the intertwined destinies of Aboriginal and Settler from the moment of invasion, contact and occupancy to the contradictory aspirations and government policies of today. In carrying out this project Scott consistently engages with the history and discourses that shape the national imaginary. Paradoxically it is this focus on the national that establishes Kim Scott as an international writer of stature.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Last amended 31 Oct 2019 09:12:50
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