3846014452575534636.jpeg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y The Disappearance of Ember Crow single work   novel   young adult   fantasy  
Is part of Tribe Ambelin Kwaymullina 2012- series - author novel (number 2 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2013... 2013 The Disappearance of Ember Crow
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Sequel to the Tribe Book 1: The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf this follows the story of Ashala Wolf. 'To find her friend, Ashala Wolf must control her increasingly erratic and dangerous Sleepwalking ability and leave the Firstwood. But Ashala doesn’t realise that Ember is harbouring terrible secrets and is trying to shield the Tribe and all Illegals from a devastating new threat - her own past.' (Source: Publishers website)

Exhibitions

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Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Newtown, Marrickville - Camperdown area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney,: Walker Books Australia , 2013 .
      3846014452575534636.jpeg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Note/s:
      • Release date 1 November 2013
      ISBN: 9781921720093 (pbk), 9781922244277 (ebook), 9781922244291 (ebook), 9781922244284 (ebook)

Works about this Work

Of Windows and Mirrors : Ambelin Kwaymullin's The Tribe Series, Transformative Fan Cultures and Aboriginal Eptistimologies Annika Herb , Brooke Collins-Gearing , Henk Huijser , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 62 no. 1 2017; (p. 110-124)

Indigenous people lived through the end of the world, but we did not end, We survived by holding on to our cultures, our kin, and our sense of what was right in a world gone terribly wrong (Kwaymullina, 'Edges' 29)

'Young Adult Australian post-apocalyptic speculative fiction carries with it a number of expectations and tropes : that characters will exist in a dystopian, ruined landscape, that a lone teenager will rise up and rebel against institutionalised structures of repressive power; and that these youths will carry hope for the future in a destroyed world.' (Introduction)

How Australian Dystopian Young Adult Fiction Differs from Its US Counterparts Diana Hodge , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 4 August 2015;
'For children and adolescents, the tyranny of adults can make any world dystopian. Real or fictional – no apocalypse required. But how does our Australian young adult fiction (of the dystopian variety) differ from that being produced in the US? And why do teenagers love dystopia so much?' (Introduction)
The Disappearance of Ember Crow (The Tribe: Book 2) Anastasia Gonis , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Buzz Words , December 2013;

— Review of The Disappearance of Ember Crow Ambelin Kwaymullina 2013 single work novel
The Disappearance of Ember Crow (The Tribe: Book 2) Anastasia Gonis , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Buzz Words , December 2013;

— Review of The Disappearance of Ember Crow Ambelin Kwaymullina 2013 single work novel
How Australian Dystopian Young Adult Fiction Differs from Its US Counterparts Diana Hodge , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 4 August 2015;
'For children and adolescents, the tyranny of adults can make any world dystopian. Real or fictional – no apocalypse required. But how does our Australian young adult fiction (of the dystopian variety) differ from that being produced in the US? And why do teenagers love dystopia so much?' (Introduction)
Of Windows and Mirrors : Ambelin Kwaymullin's The Tribe Series, Transformative Fan Cultures and Aboriginal Eptistimologies Annika Herb , Brooke Collins-Gearing , Henk Huijser , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 62 no. 1 2017; (p. 110-124)

Indigenous people lived through the end of the world, but we did not end, We survived by holding on to our cultures, our kin, and our sense of what was right in a world gone terribly wrong (Kwaymullina, 'Edges' 29)

'Young Adult Australian post-apocalyptic speculative fiction carries with it a number of expectations and tropes : that characters will exist in a dystopian, ruined landscape, that a lone teenager will rise up and rebel against institutionalised structures of repressive power; and that these youths will carry hope for the future in a destroyed world.' (Introduction)

Last amended 15 Nov 2017 11:51:58
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