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form y separately published work icon In the Cut single work   film/TV   thriller   mystery   crime  
Adaptation of In the Cut Susanna Moore , 1995 single work novel
Note: Co-written with Susanna Moore.
Issue Details: First known date: 2003... 2003 In the Cut
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

An English teacher becomes entangled in a series of gruesome murders occurring in her Manhattan neighbourhood.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

In the Cut (Jane Campion, 2003) David Richard , 2017 single work column
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , September vol. 84 no. 2017;
Something Borrowed, Something Blue : Bluebeard Dismembers Romance in Australasia and Beyond Lucy Butler , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , vol. 4 no. 1 2015; (p. 57-72)
'This article surveys a range of relatively recent works in which the Bluebeard figure of fairy tale appears to cut to the paradoxical ‘heart’ of the mythology of romantic love in popular culture. Creative practitioners in Australasia and beyond are using the sinister figure of Bluebeard to critique romantic mythology, probing, in particular, the fraught intersection of love, knowledge and artistry. In the works of Jane Campion, Nick Cave, Sarah Quigley and others, Bluebeard comes to signify the violence that can accompany the lover and/as artist’s attempts to define the self through the other and the other through the self. In recent times, Bluebeard and his wife are doubled in their pursuit of penetrative knowledge of the other in the name of love, and this romantic quest is here equated with an erasure of the beloved’s subjectivity and the reduction of love’s potential. Bluebeard, in the hands of these predominately female creators, lends himself to an exploration of the contemporary dilemmas of love, encouraging us to question the demands we make of each other and ourselves in the realm of romance. This article focuses on Bluebeard in recent Australasian works read in an international and historical context.' (Publication abstract)
Too Close to the Bone : The International Critical Reception of Jane Campion's In the Cut Lucy , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , March vol. 7 no. 1 2013; (p. 9-22)

'This article examines the international critical reception of Australasian Director Jane Campion’s In the Cut (2003). It suggests that the loaded language of reviews, and the pervasive reading of the film’s female characters as masochistic, deluded or sex-crazed, ironically amplify the themes that In the Cut self-consciously explores, namely the relation of romantic love to language, knowledge and narrative violence. Campion’s critique of the popular mythology of romantic love and her depiction of a complex adult female sexuality, a sexuality of private experience rather than display, is in productive tension with the serial-killer thriller format. An opaque female narrative perspective that refuses revelation and complicates (rather than inverts) the predator-prey dichotomy provokes deep unease within the genre. Ultimately, it is the stark vulnerability of the female characters as they risk their limits in real embodied connection that has been reviled by many reviewers, provoking a discourse of disgust and a characterization of the erotic content of the film as perverse or ‘kinky’ when there is little in the film to support this reading. The clichés of female sexuality mobilized in the mainstream critical debate surrounding In the Cut underline the importance of Campion’s demythologizing project and illustrate the continued relevance of feminist-oriented film scholarship, even as some reviews pre-emptively mock or reject such readings.' (Author's abstract)

An Australasian Lens? Anthony Lambert , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , March vol. 7 no. 1 2013; (p. 3-7)

'The uses and understandings of the category ‘Australasian’ seem to shift and vary within the multiple contexts of the term’s application. Each new

volume of Studies in Australasian Cinema, for example, not only negotiates the elasticity of screen culture, production, and scholarship as critical ‘objects’, but also speaks simultaneously (often in the broadest and even tangential senses) to regional experiences of, or responses to, all of these. ' (Author's introduction)

A Dark-Adapting Eye : Susanna Moore, Jane Campion, and the Fractured World of Postmodern Noir John Hodgkins , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: College Literature , Fall vol. 39 no. 4 2012; (p. 46-68)

'This essay troubles the 'fidelity model' of adaptation criticism by mobilizing a slightly more dialogic analytical lens: one which re-conceives literary and cinematic works as textual engines generating and circulating affect, and the adaptive process as a productive drifting of those intensities from one medium to another. Specifically, I offer close readings of Susanna Moore's 1995 novel In the Cut and Jane Campion's 2003 filmic adaptation, not with an eye toward similarities and differences in story or character, but rather toward the palpable affective forces fostered by Moore's text -- the unease and anxiety, the discomfort and dread -- and the means by which Campion's film seeks to tap into those affective lines of flight, seeks to redirect those intensities from page to screen. In the process, I illustrate how both works, each in its own unique manner, come to function as critical meditations on the seemingly fragmented nature of postmodern identity.'

Source: Abstract.

An Australasian Lens? Anthony Lambert , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , March vol. 7 no. 1 2013; (p. 3-7)

'The uses and understandings of the category ‘Australasian’ seem to shift and vary within the multiple contexts of the term’s application. Each new

volume of Studies in Australasian Cinema, for example, not only negotiates the elasticity of screen culture, production, and scholarship as critical ‘objects’, but also speaks simultaneously (often in the broadest and even tangential senses) to regional experiences of, or responses to, all of these. ' (Author's introduction)

Too Close to the Bone : The International Critical Reception of Jane Campion's In the Cut Lucy , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , March vol. 7 no. 1 2013; (p. 9-22)

'This article examines the international critical reception of Australasian Director Jane Campion’s In the Cut (2003). It suggests that the loaded language of reviews, and the pervasive reading of the film’s female characters as masochistic, deluded or sex-crazed, ironically amplify the themes that In the Cut self-consciously explores, namely the relation of romantic love to language, knowledge and narrative violence. Campion’s critique of the popular mythology of romantic love and her depiction of a complex adult female sexuality, a sexuality of private experience rather than display, is in productive tension with the serial-killer thriller format. An opaque female narrative perspective that refuses revelation and complicates (rather than inverts) the predator-prey dichotomy provokes deep unease within the genre. Ultimately, it is the stark vulnerability of the female characters as they risk their limits in real embodied connection that has been reviled by many reviewers, provoking a discourse of disgust and a characterization of the erotic content of the film as perverse or ‘kinky’ when there is little in the film to support this reading. The clichés of female sexuality mobilized in the mainstream critical debate surrounding In the Cut underline the importance of Campion’s demythologizing project and illustrate the continued relevance of feminist-oriented film scholarship, even as some reviews pre-emptively mock or reject such readings.' (Author's abstract)

Something Borrowed, Something Blue : Bluebeard Dismembers Romance in Australasia and Beyond Lucy Butler , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Popular Culture , vol. 4 no. 1 2015; (p. 57-72)
'This article surveys a range of relatively recent works in which the Bluebeard figure of fairy tale appears to cut to the paradoxical ‘heart’ of the mythology of romantic love in popular culture. Creative practitioners in Australasia and beyond are using the sinister figure of Bluebeard to critique romantic mythology, probing, in particular, the fraught intersection of love, knowledge and artistry. In the works of Jane Campion, Nick Cave, Sarah Quigley and others, Bluebeard comes to signify the violence that can accompany the lover and/as artist’s attempts to define the self through the other and the other through the self. In recent times, Bluebeard and his wife are doubled in their pursuit of penetrative knowledge of the other in the name of love, and this romantic quest is here equated with an erasure of the beloved’s subjectivity and the reduction of love’s potential. Bluebeard, in the hands of these predominately female creators, lends himself to an exploration of the contemporary dilemmas of love, encouraging us to question the demands we make of each other and ourselves in the realm of romance. This article focuses on Bluebeard in recent Australasian works read in an international and historical context.' (Publication abstract)
Jane Campion's Women's Films : Art Cinema and the Postfeminist Rape Narrative Shelley Cobb , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rape in Art Cinema 2010; (p. 99-111)

Examines how Jane Campion's films 'all subvert the conservative conclusions of the postfeminist rape narrative by mixing mainstream and art cinema aesthetics' (p.100).

Engaging Medusa : Competing Myths and Fairytales in In the Cut Sue Gillett , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , April - June no. 31 2004;

'In this imaginative analysis of Jane Campion's latest film, the desires and trajectories of contemporary characters are revealed to be not all that far removed from those of ancient mythology.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 9 Dec 2013 15:19:33
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