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Children’s Literature Digital Resources
A Full Text Repository of Early Australian Children's Literature
Compiled by Amy Cross, Cherie Allan, Michelle Dicinoski & Kerry Mallan.

(Status : Public)
Coordinated by AACLAP & CLDR Editors
  • Published Articles

  • A Token to the Future: A Digital 'Archive' of Early Australian Children's Literature / Kerry Mallan, Amy Cross & Cherie Allan (2012)

    This essay considers a specific digital ‘archive’ of early Australian children’s literature, known as the Children’s Literature Digital Resources (CLDR), which is located in AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource. Our paper discusses how early Australian children’s literature included in the CLDR collection rhetorically constructs nation and place, and in so doing constructs an Australian identity for its implied readers (Author abbstract). (...more)
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    Peer reviewed.

  • Digital Archives and Cultural Memory: Discovering Lost Histories in Digitised Australian Children's Literature 1851-1945 / Michelle Dicinoski (2012)

    A recent Australian literature digitisation project uncovered some surprising discoveries in the children’s books that it digitised. The Children’s Literature Digital Resources (CLDR) Project digitised children’s books that were first published between 1851 to 1945 and made them available online through AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource. The digitisation process also preserved, within the pages of those books, a range of bookplates, book labels, inscriptions, and loose ephemera. This material allows us to trace the provenance of some of the digitised works, some of which came from the personal libraries of now-famous authors, and others from less celebrated sources. (...more)
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    Peer reviewed.

  • Networked Reading: Using AustLit to Assist Reading and Understanding of Text from the Past / Roger Osborne & Cherie Allan

    In response to a focus on reading, this paper examines the notion of reading online; as such it uses the term 'networked reading' to describe any act of reading in an online or digital environment. In accordance with this notion of 'networked' reading, the paper provides a broad introduction to AustLit: the Australian Literature Resource. This is followed by an examination of a suite of services and digital tools (LORE) developed by the Aus-e-Lit project that extends the scope of AustLit records and facilitates links to external resources. (...more)
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    Peer reviewed.

  • Children's Literature Digital Resources: Stimulating Imaginative Responses to Literature / Michelle Dicinoski, Cherie Allan & Amy Cross

    "As is evident from the National Curriculum's renewed emphasis on literature, traditional books remain important even in a digital age. Books actively engage the imagination, encouraging children to create their own images, ill in textual gaps, try out new identities and consider different ways of looking at familiar scenarios. This paper sets out to demonstrate how digital technologies can work with literature to bring the past into the present." (...more)
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    Essay.

  • Present and Active: Digital Publishing in a Post-Print Age / Kerry Mallan & Annette Patterson (2008)

    Mallan and Patterson contend that despite the enduring value of print, digital publishing is 'present and active' and is changing the way in which research, particularly in the humanities, is being undertaken. Their approach has three parts: firstly, they consider how digital technologies are changing the way in which content is constructed, customised, modified, disseminated, and accessed within a global, distributed network. This section argues that the transition from print to electronic or digital publishing means both losses and gains, particularly with respect to shifts in their approaches to textuality, information, and innovative publishing. (...more)
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    Peer reviewed.

  • CLDR Trails

    AustLit Trails are curated information trails of texts and resources within a narrative thread on a specific theme. They are sites where connections between resources can be made and a thorough history of a resource can be displayed, from author biographies to publications, translations, adaptations, and reviews of the resource. 

    A number of Trails have been created to demonstrate ways in which the CLDR collection could be used in education. The Trails listed below are intended to suggest ways in which the early texts from the CLDR site could be used in conjunction with contemporary texts and other resources in English classes, or how they could be used to create deep learning experiences through which to enhance History, SOSE, Art, and/or Media lessons. Teachers may wish to use extracts or illustrations from some of the texts in order to address, for instance, point of view or visual representations. Tertiary students could also use them as a useful starting point for their particular research.

    The trails may be used in English classes, or to create deep learning experiences through which to enhance History, Art, and/or Media lessons. Teachers may wish to use extracts or illustrations from some of the texts in order to address, for instance, point of view or visual representations.

    Click on the links below to access the specific trails, or use the menu on the left.

    Australia's Engagement with War Early Representations of Aboriginal Australians in Children's Fiction
    Raising Awareness of the Environment in Early Australian Children's Texts Children Lost in the Bush

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