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Issue Details: First known date: 2022... 2022 Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In January 1972, five women took to the stage of Carlton’s Pram Factory to preview their women’s play Betty Can Jump. Claire Dobbin, Helen Garner, Evelyn Krape, Jude Kuring and Yvonne Marini mocked the ocker character beloved by Pram Factory playwrights, and performed monologues about men, sex, and how they felt “as a woman”. Directed by Kerry Dwyer and produced by the Carlton Women’s Liberation group, the play’s frank revelations stunned audiences and shocked the Pram Factory world.

'Set against a backdrop of moratorium marches, inner-city cafes and share houses, and the rising tide of sexual liberation and countercultural movements, Kath Kenny uses interviews and archival material to tell the story of Betty Can Jump. On the 50th anniversary of this ground-breaking play, she considers its ongoing impact on Australian culture, and asks why the great cultural renaissance of women’s liberation has been largely forgotten. She sets out her stake in this story, as a theatre reviewer today and as a child born into the revolutionary early 1970s. And she asks why feminism keeps getting stuck in mother-daughter battles, rethinking her own experience as a young feminist who clashed with Garner over the publication of The First Stone.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Perth, Western Australia,: Upswell Publishing , 2022 .
      image of person or book cover 1881997094529738459.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 270p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published October 2022.
      ISBN: 9780645248050

Works about this Work

Review of: Staging a Revolution: When Betty Rocked the Pram Emma Brennan , 2023 single work review
— Appears in: Lilith , January no. 29 2023; (p. 215-217)

— Review of Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Kath Kenny , 2022 multi chapter work criticism
 'Kath Kenny’s monograph is an invigorating history of the women’s play Betty Can Jump, performed at the Pram Factory in early 1970s Melbourne. Extended from her award-winning doctoral thesis on theatre and film groups of the Australian Women’s Liberation Movement (WLM), Staging a Revolution, an account of before, during, and the legacy of Betty, is a vivid and endearing contribution to cultural Australian and WLM historiography. Betty, and Kenny’s historicization of it, both sit outside typical Anglo male history. As Kenny emphasises, the collective, evolving, and ephemeral nature of feminist art during the WLM means these activisms can often be forgotten. Until now.' (Introduction) 
Pram Factory Births Feminist Theatre Barbara Henery , 2023 single work column
— Appears in: Jessie Street National Women's Library Newsletter , July vol. 34 no. 3 2023;
'In interviewing second wave feminists for her PhD, Kath was shocked to discover that newspaper employment columns were divided into male and female categories and that women were banned from public bars in hotels. In the 60s, women made up only 25% of undergraduates. There were no women in the House of Representative until 1974. But once women began to speak up, change came quickly.' (Introduction)
[Review] Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Verity Laughton , 2023 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , 1 April no. 82 2023; (p. 260-266)

— Review of Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Kath Kenny , 2022 multi chapter work criticism
When Betty Took Over the Pram Factory Susan Lever , 2022 single work review
— Appears in: Inside Story , October 2022;

— Review of Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Kath Kenny , 2022 multi chapter work criticism

'Kath Kenny’s intergenerational account of a key moment in Australian theatre'

[Review] Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Verity Laughton , 2023 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , 1 April no. 82 2023; (p. 260-266)

— Review of Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Kath Kenny , 2022 multi chapter work criticism
When Betty Took Over the Pram Factory Susan Lever , 2022 single work review
— Appears in: Inside Story , October 2022;

— Review of Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Kath Kenny , 2022 multi chapter work criticism

'Kath Kenny’s intergenerational account of a key moment in Australian theatre'

Review of: Staging a Revolution: When Betty Rocked the Pram Emma Brennan , 2023 single work review
— Appears in: Lilith , January no. 29 2023; (p. 215-217)

— Review of Staging a Revolution : When Betty Rocked the Pram Kath Kenny , 2022 multi chapter work criticism
 'Kath Kenny’s monograph is an invigorating history of the women’s play Betty Can Jump, performed at the Pram Factory in early 1970s Melbourne. Extended from her award-winning doctoral thesis on theatre and film groups of the Australian Women’s Liberation Movement (WLM), Staging a Revolution, an account of before, during, and the legacy of Betty, is a vivid and endearing contribution to cultural Australian and WLM historiography. Betty, and Kenny’s historicization of it, both sit outside typical Anglo male history. As Kenny emphasises, the collective, evolving, and ephemeral nature of feminist art during the WLM means these activisms can often be forgotten. Until now.' (Introduction) 
Pram Factory Births Feminist Theatre Barbara Henery , 2023 single work column
— Appears in: Jessie Street National Women's Library Newsletter , July vol. 34 no. 3 2023;
'In interviewing second wave feminists for her PhD, Kath was shocked to discover that newspaper employment columns were divided into male and female categories and that women were banned from public bars in hotels. In the 60s, women made up only 25% of undergraduates. There were no women in the House of Representative until 1974. But once women began to speak up, change came quickly.' (Introduction)
Last amended 14 Dec 2022 16:09:58
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